Rob Herman
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To start: I like Race for the Galaxy ("RftG") a lot. It is up my alley; I rate it a 9. But there are a lot of people out there who won't like it. In this short review, I give the 5 most important reasons you might not like it; then, for contrast, five ways it I feel it is better than Puerto Rico, an excellent "reference point" game that obviously inspired RftG and will be familiar to most.

(I realize there are a lot of comparisons with San Juan as well as Puerto Rico. In terms of depth and complexity, I feel RftG has more in common with the senior game, although the cards and in particular cards-as-currency is clearly very reminiscent of San Juan.)

You can read a rules overview in any one of several good explanation-centric reviews, like this one, and also read gushing praise, most of which I agree with. On to the negatives.

Minimal Interactivity

The accusations say "multiplayer solitaire". Well, the accusations are correct. For players with a few games of experience, there are two primary means of interaction, both nontrivial but very subtle. From observing your opponents, you choose your action to capitalize on the action you expect them to take. And you can choose your own action to make sure they will not gain a greater benefit than you will. That's it. Beginning players, even seasoned gamers, will be too busy studying at their own hands and cards to notice anything about the opponents other than how much progress they have toward the 12-card end condition.

Frustrating Graphic Design

The text is small. The icons are small. The pictures are nice, but during the game you'll be way too busy squinting at the icons to notice. The game benefits from a very skilled explainer, or players who have familiarized themselves with the rules beforehand; I consider myself pretty good and still had trouble explaining how the icons next to the phases on developments and worlds correspond to privileges and abilities that are available in the corresponding phase. This, the most unique and hardest part of the game rules, is also the part that previous San Juan/Puerto Rico experience won't help you with.

Steep Learning Curve

Remember your first few games of Puerto Rico? Remember how slowly you developed? If you played against experienced players, you were probably stunned by how much they built and shipped so quickly; it was like magic. Thanks to an intricate web of relationships between the cards, RftG has the same effect. This is not an unmitigated negative point; it means the game has lots of depth, lots to learn and explore. But I definitely do not believe that it is gateway-friendly, and I don't think it will be received well by very light or very casual gamers.

Soft Theme

Like Puerto Rico, RftG is not abstract--it seems to have been developed with the theme, economic development in space, in mind. Also like Puerto Rico, the theme is only loosely bound to the game. In my mind, this is all the theme you need--enough to inspire the designer--but I realize that a lot of people enjoy more. You won't think about it much in play, there are some silly elements if you actually think about it, and the game doesn't really "tell a story".

Expansions Coming Soon

The game was developed alongside its expansions; you can read about it at BGN here. Some gamers object to expansions following so closely on the heels of the game.


And now, lest you think me only negative, five ways Race for the Galaxy is better than Puerto Rico. If you like Puerto Rico and are not put off by the negatives above, perhaps you will be intrigued by the way RftG mitigates some of Puerto Rico's annoyances. If you are a Puerto Rico dissenter, perhaps this will assuage some of your concerns.

Tiny Setup Time

Pull out 12 VP chips. Find the homeworlds and deal them out. Shuffle. Go. You can go from opening the box to starting the game in 2 minutes. Puerto Rico has a pretty onerous starting time--count out the colonists, count the VPs, shuffle the plantations, find the buildings and match them with the board.

No Waiting Around

The minimal interactivity carries a couple of major upsides. One is the fact that actions are simultaneous. Everyone does their thinking at once, which makes the game flow briskly (I find this very pleasant) and virtually eliminates downtime.

Unscripted

Settler/Quarry? Like hell! Between a different homeworld and a different set of cards available--both the meat-and-potatoes empire chunks and the 6-point developments--you will need to adapt to a different set of resources and a changing environment every game. Part of the aforementioned learning curve is knowing what cards are out there so you will be able to put together a plan based on the kinds of cards you can expect to come your way.

The Novice To Your Left Won't Choose The Craftsman All The Time

The other upside to minimal interactivity and simultaneous turns is that there's almost no importance on seating order. A novice or reckless player might not score well, but won't frustrate the other players, and this in turn will probably mean a more satisfying and friendly game for everyone.

Even More Victory Paths

Puerto Rico has a building strategy and a shipping strategy that work and what seems like a lot of false leads that look promising but don't stack up. RftG has at the very least building, military, and consumption, and each one of these broad strategies has many variations that will need to be tuned during the game based on what cards show up when.
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Sheamus Parkes
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Re: Five reasons to think twice; five plusses over Puerto Ri
Nice review!

Just thought I'd mention that during setup you pull out 12 VP per person.


I do like all of your pros and cons tho!
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Re: Five reasons to think twice; five plusses over Puerto Ri
Isamoor wrote:
Nice review!

Just thought I'd mention that during setup you pull out 12 VP per person.


I do like all of your pros and cons tho!


Thank you!

You're right about the VPs but heck--in a 4-player game, you don't need to pull any out; since there are 48 total (in 1s and 5s), you just notice when they're all gone. In a 3-player game, you put 12 aside. Only with 2 is there much counting to speak of.
 
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This is a very useful review for me as I'm on the cusp of a purchase decision between PR and RftG.

Having said that I'm sure I'll end up buying both as I am somewhat of a tool when it comes to spending.
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Re: Five reasons to think twice; five plusses over Puerto Ri
dreaming_idiot wrote:
This is a very useful review for me as I'm on the cusp of a purchase decision between PR and RftG.


Both good games, but pretty drastically different time frames. Do you want a 90+ minute board game with lotsa bits, or a 20-30 minute card game?
 
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Great review, Rob. I also give this game a 9 and love it to death. I agree with you on most of your points. Honestly, though, I'm not bothered in the slightest by upcoming expansions. This is a perfect game for expanding by simply tossing in more cards. And soft theme means the game could be re-done in a fantasy motif, historical motif, etc. Fine with me.
 
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Isamoor wrote:
dreaming_idiot wrote:
This is a very useful review for me as I'm on the cusp of a purchase decision between PR and RftG.


Both good games, but pretty drastically different time frames. Do you want a 90+ minute board game with lotsa bits, or a 20-30 minute card game?


Clearly Duncan needs to buy them both as speculated and thus have both options!
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Re: Five reasons to think twice; five plusses over Puerto Ri
Thank you for the run down. I don't think RFtG will be on my favorites list anytime soon, I like more interactivity, but having played it I do see the elegance of the design.

Personally I found the icons pretty easy to use, it was a lot easier then reading each card in San Juan.

While you have to know the cards to play well, I found it was pretty easy to just play. The basic dynamic is simple, the subtlety of building a strategy might take longer, but since I was playing with equally inexperienced players didn't hurt my experience.
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Having played a few two player games i would say the game is very limited, in this format, it becomes far to easy for one person to settle into a certain pattern, e.g. produce/comsume, make a military rush, make a settle rush, and for the other person to try and crash end the game by cranking out 12 cards, and if you having a bad run in your hand you might as well just give up.

That said i really to like it as a game, i can see the depth too it in the various methods of winning, but think more players following more paths will allow full exploitation of the cards abilities, and perhaps make it a more satisfying play, and durable play.

As a game i found the whole thing very confusing to start with but persistance has lead to an understanding of the cards, yes the learning curve was hard but once i had a grasp of what things roughly ment it led to a want to see how they work in play.

So much so i spent a week thinking about them, and demanded to play the game when i was at my mates, with the fog lifted you can quickly begin to appreciate the game further, though for me i don't think the two player game can deliver, but 4 - 6 would make things far more interesting.

It will be good to see what the expansion brings.



 
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Re: Five reasons to think twice; five plusses over Puerto Ri
Quote:
Expansions Coming Soon

The game was developed alongside its expansions; you can read about it at BGN here. Some gamers object to expansions following so closely on the heels of the game.


Judging by the steep learning curve and the difficulty with card design, it seems kind of a blessing not to have introduced the expansions with the game. I can't imagine it would have improved those two negatives much.

I appreciate your assessment. Based on it, I think it'll be a game I'll buy sometime in the future but with the mindset that I need to really learn it well before introducing it to my San Juan loving wife.
 
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He's looking real sharp in his 1940's fedora. He's got nerves of steel, an iron will, and several other metal-themed attributes. His fur is water tight and he's always up for a fight.
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He's a semi-aquatic egg-laying mammal of action. He's a furry little flat-foot who'll never flinch from a fray. He's got more than just mad skills, he's got a beaver tail and a bill.
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Auzette wrote:
Quote:
Expansions Coming Soon

The game was developed alongside its expansions; you can read about it at BGN here. Some gamers object to expansions following so closely on the heels of the game.


Judging by the steep learning curve and the difficulty with card design, it seems kind of a blessing not to have introduced the expansions with the game. I can't imagine it would have improved those two negatives much.

I appreciate your assessment. Based on it, I think it'll be a game I'll buy sometime in the future but with the mindset that I need to really learn it well before introducing it to my San Juan loving wife.


I'd actually recommend learning it together. Unless you play to win and don't want to lose to your wife. Experience with the cards will make you a better player and make it harder for her to play competitively to start. If she knows San Juan, the differences aren't so hard to comprehend. I taught this to my wife who has never seen San Juan it took her a while to figure out how goods work and the relationship between the colors of planets/goods and consuming. There's so much you can take directly from San Juan and paste onto an explanation of this game, though, that it's really difficult to remember all the nuances when you're explaining it to a non-Juan player.
 
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I've played about 10-12 games of this now, mostly 2-player with my girlfriend (I know, I'm very lucky!)
I actually found myself disagreeing with many of your cons. Let me post my thoughts about each briefly.

Interactivity: There isn't a huge amount, but it's definitely there. My girlfriend has often gotten mad at me, especially when playing the expert 2-player game, because I have perfectly guessed her 2 action choices. Once I saw that she was likely to consume, so I developed and settled to get both a great development consume power and a windfall to consume for VP's. She has also done a great job of leaching off of my actions. In one game she saw that I was pretty much locked into a military settling strategy, so she put down the terraforming robots and used all of my settling actions to plop down 1 and 2 cost planets for free.
So there is interaction in my opinion, as long as you take a minute to look at your opponent and see what they are doing.

Graphic Design: The text and symbols are small. And it has taken my RFTG students until the end of their first game to really "get" the symbols. But everyone I have taught the game to has recognized all of the symbols starting with their second game. I think that the symbols are clear in their meaning, and none of us need the cheat cards after the second game.

Learning Curve: I haven't had anyone do incredibly badly or incredibly well in any of our games. There haven't been any 10 VP vs. 50 VP blowouts. So maybe my friends' skill levels are too close to mine, but none of my games have had a rookie failing at everything while an expert built the universe.

Soft Theme: I've heard this said a lot, and I actually disagree to a large extent. When I look at the cards, most of their powers really seem to make sense with what their title and illustration would indicate.
To give a few examples, the SETI 6 cost-development gives you VP's for having explore powers and for having planets. It makes sense that a galactic exploration project would be more successful with more exploratory options and more planets explored.
The pirate world produces stolen novelty goods, and also gives you big bucks for goods sold through their planet (their own lilttle pirate black market).
The contact specialist can broker military deals, but can't comprehend complex alien ideas and technologies. The drop ships and space marines kick butt and take names. The 6-cost development that gives VPs equal to military represents how far your military might gets you in the goal to be emperor of the galaxy, etc.
Now maybe I just have too active of an imagination, but I love how the different actions, icons, bonuses, and cards all interact in my space empire.

Expansions: It's been said many times, but if you don't like expansions coming out than don't buy them.
I have seen the point made that some games are split in production to create base games and expansions (Duel of Ages, Combat Commander, etc.) I can see irritation at buying expansions being valid in this case, but just expansions in general have no negative quality for me.

Sorry for the long post. Very nice review.
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He's looking real sharp in his 1940's fedora. He's got nerves of steel, an iron will, and several other metal-themed attributes. His fur is water tight and he's always up for a fight.
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He's a semi-aquatic egg-laying mammal of action. He's a furry little flat-foot who'll never flinch from a fray. He's got more than just mad skills, he's got a beaver tail and a bill.
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I've come to terms with people not liking this kind of player interaction, where the screwage is minimal. But let me tell you, if you sit on a good it's going to get consumed instead of traded like you wanted. Exploring gives everyone a card, not just you, so if that's your major card-gathering mechanic you have a problem. If someone is on a P-C cycle and I have deficit spending/merchant world on a trade strategy, I'll be pulling trade-consume as they're pulling produce to keep up with those extra couple points without helping them at all. And I'll have enough cards to settle or develop and discard next turn, too. Or, you can pull Produce while they're consuming and let them do it two turns in a row. There's interaction there, for sure. It's just so intuitive to not help your opponent that you don't consider it interacting!

 
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Sitnaltax wrote:
Isamoor wrote:
Nice review!

Just thought I'd mention that during setup you pull out 12 VP per person.


I do like all of your pros and cons tho!


Thank you!

You're right about the VPs but heck--in a 4-player game, you don't need to pull any out; since there are 48 total (in 1s and 5s), you just notice when they're all gone. In a 3-player game, you put 12 aside. Only with 2 is there much counting to speak of.


For 2 usually just pull out four 5's and four 1's, leaving two fives and fourteen ones, although I do an actual count from time to time since sometimes a point gets lost in a tableau and forgotten
 
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"Minimal Interactivity": I somewhat agree. There is interaction but it is subtle. Its pretty much like Puerto Rico in this respect.

Graphic Design: I LOVE the symbols and the card design, I think its exceptional.

Steep Learning Curve: Definitely. I dont mind steep learning curves though, especially in a game thats short. There is a steep learning curve because there is a lot of depth.

Theme: I feel the game has a very strong theme, stronger than most other games. I dont see how anyone can even say that it has a weak theme.

Expansions: If the game is good, expansions are a good thing.
 
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Re: Five reasons to think twice; five plusses over Puerto Ri
Alexfrog wrote:
"Minimal Interactivity": I somewhat agree. There is interaction but it is subtle. It's pretty much like Puerto Rico in this respect.

It is not at all like Puerto Rico in this respect. There, there is interaction in monopolizing a bonus, getting first crack at a choice, affecting the ordering of actions/events, and directly controlling choices others can make (especially evident with shipping). On several of these they are not just individual choices, but individual contributions to group choices, because each person makes a part of the decision (eg, ordering actions or which goods get shipped). That is quite interactive, and involves the players and the group in the choices made. San Juan has less of these, but still a couple of them.

RftG has, explicitly, none of those things (except by controlling the flow of cards through your hand to manipulate the deck). The interaction is entirely guessing what action your opponents will offer you and what they'll make of actions you offer them, plus analyzing whether your strategy will compete effectively with theirs before game end. That is interaction. RftG fans need to accept, however, that it is not interaction that some people find remotely interesting, meaningful, or, well, much like actually *interacting* with people. Obviously lots of people like it, but that doesn't mean those finding it lacking don't get it.

Personally, I'm going to try some changes to see if we can uneviscerate the interaction a bit, because there looks to be plenty of good game in there.

Quote:
Steep Learning Curve: Definitely. I dont mind steep learning curves though, especially in a game thats short. There is a steep learning curve because there is a lot of depth.

There is a steep learning curve for RftG, yes, but a steep learning curve means one quickly increases learning with minimal time/effort. The game is pretty basic and everything works in a pretty obvious fashion, with relatively helpful icons. I like that about it.

Quote:
Theme: I feel the game has a very strong theme, stronger than most other games. I dont see how anyone can even say that it has a weak theme.

Aside from pictures, it would be trivial to make the game about drug dealing, raising cats, or pretty much anything else you want. It has nothing to do with its theme, because its base mechanics are pretty simple and abstracted. The very idea of, eg, one galactic nation being able to settle a planet because someone else chose to, having numerous galactic empires with absolutely no forms of trade/communication, or windfall vs production vs non-production *worlds*, is patently absurd. I'm not saying that's a negative for the game, and I like the theme and base systems, but it's silly to argue against people that feel the theme is weak when the game is so obviously abstracted. You can take out everything but the icons, and they have nothing to do with space empires.

Quote:
Expansions: If the game is good, expansions are a good thing.

They intentionally sold us less of the game than they made. That's what bothers people more about expansions, and it's more than fair to be bothered by it, because it treats us, the customers, poorly.
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Re: Five reasons to think twice; five plusses over Puerto Ri
xethair wrote:
RftG has, explicitly, none of those things (except by controlling the flow of cards through your hand to manipulate the deck). The interaction is entirely guessing what action your opponents will offer you and what they'll make of actions you offer them, plus analyzing whether your strategy will compete effectively with theirs before game end. That is interaction. RftG fans need to accept, however, that it is not interaction that some people find remotely interesting, meaningful, or, well, much like actually *interacting* with people. Obviously lots of people like it, but that doesn't mean those finding it lacking don't get it.


It seems like you do get it, and you've given it a fair shake. That's fine, and it's not a huge crisis that you don't like it.

What gets really tiresome are the people reporting, "Yeah, I've played this game twice, spent both games deciphering icons, and since I'm now an expert I declare this to be multiplayer solitaire."
 
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cree1978 wrote:
Having played a few two player games i would say the game is very limited, in this format, it becomes far to easy for one person to settle into a certain pattern, e.g. produce/comsume, make a military rush, make a settle rush, and for the other person to try and crash end the game by cranking out 12 cards, and if you having a bad run in your hand you might as well just give up.

"though for me i don't think the two player game can deliver, but 4 - 6 would make things far more interesting."


This is also a concern for me. I feel two player San Juan boils down to more of a "race" than a game, I do like it with 3 players.

I have played this 3 and 4 player and both numbers seem good but the two player does have me concerned. There are more options here but I'm not sure that will save the 2 player.
 
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Re: Five reasons to think twice; five plusses over Puerto Ri
I hate to call myself a "novice" gamer, but I guess it's the truth in many ways. While I've played Settlers for quite a few years and the crayon rails even longer (heck, I play tested Lunar Rails), this game took me a long time to understand just from the rules.

I've never player Puerto Rico so I don't have that to compare it with.

But I found the rules extremely confusing. My son had chosen the game and we were trying to learn it together. It took me 20 - 30 minutes to get the fact that a production good had nothing to do with the card the is drawn when you produce. That card is just a marker, showing you've produced. (At least, I hope that's right.)

I'd love to play this with someone who really understood the game so I could see just how the various cards are used.

I'm not sure how well I like it yet. I need to play a few more times to get a better hand on how to play. Then maybe I could offer a real opinion.
 
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xethair wrote:
They intentionally sold us less of the game than they made. That's what bothers people more about expansions, and it's more than fair to be bothered by it, because it treats us, the customers, poorly.


While that may certainly be true for some games, I don't think it was the case with this one. In this article (http://www.boardgamenews.com/index.php/boardgamenews/comment...), the designer explains why he didn't include the expansions in the base game. I haven't played this game yet, but after reading through the rules the other night I'm still a bit confused, so I personally appreciate any limiting of complexity the designers chose to do by leaving some cards out until the expansions are released.
 
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Re: Five reasons to think twice; five plusses over Puerto Ri
xethair wrote:

They intentionally sold us less of the game than they made. That's what bothers people more about expansions, and it's more than fair to be bothered by it, because it treats us, the customers, poorly.


RftG aside, I don't actually understand the rationale behind your argument. Are you annoyed when you go to a restaurant and they insist on selling you the entree and the dessert separately? Are you annoyed when you go to a movie and your movie ticket doesn't include popcorn and a soda? When you buy a car, are you annoyed that it doesn't automatically come with tailfins?

For many things in general, I greatly prefer to buy things à la carte rather than table d'hôte.

Perhaps your complaint is that you feel that having the expansions sold separately makes getting a "complete set" more expensive than if it were in one big box. That's not unreasonable, since the expansion sets are going to have different box artwork and different economies of scale.

However, my prediction is that if both expansions sell well, we'll probably eventually see a "big box complete RftG set" somewhere down the line, much like Carcassonne.
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Sitnaltax wrote:
The Novice To Your Left Won't Choose The Craftsman All The Time

The other upside to minimal interactivity and simultaneous turns is that there's almost no importance on seating order. A novice or reckless player might not score well, but won't frustrate the other players, and this in turn will probably mean a more satisfying and friendly game for everyone.


Seating order may not be important, but oftentimes, newbies will call Explore and/or Produce waaay too many times. An experienced player got 72pts in a 4p base game b/c of that. Otherwise, this still doesn't seem to be as bad as the newbie who calls Craftsman more than he should in PR.



onigame wrote:
[q="xethair"]
RftG aside, I don't actually understand the rationale behind your argument. Are you annoyed when you go to a restaurant and they insist on selling you the entree and the dessert separately? Are you annoyed when you go to a movie and your movie ticket doesn't include popcorn and a soda? When you buy a car, are you annoyed that it doesn't automatically come with tailfins?
Some would have preferred that a version without the artwork be available, but it never works that way.
 
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I'm sorry, but I completely disagree with the multiplayer solitaire thing. After more than 800 games, I think the majority of the game is really leeching of your opponent. If you cannot successfully choose phases in a way that consistently benefits you more than them, you will lose.
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