Recommend
12 
 Thumb up
 Hide
6 Posts

When Darkness Comes» Forums » Sessions

Subject: Skulls and Bones - Solo session rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Trencher for Life
United States
Slidell
Louisiana
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
“'Join the merchant marines,' my dad said. 'See the world,' he said. He left out the part where you run for your life from reanimated skeletons! If that son of a bitch were still alive, I'd kill him right now,” James Taggart muttered to himself as he ran down the silent, sleepy streets of Dornway. He was a crew member from the M/V WILL BORDELON, a transport vessel heading to a nearby port to transfer graveyard remains to their new home. But something happened during the transport. Maybe it was that the act of disinterment caused the slumbering souls to reawaken and cause havoc. Maybe it was because they were seasick, Taggart didn't know.

What he did know was that the captain ordered him to go ashore and get some extra weapons to deal with the skeletal menace on the ship. The captain remained behind with his shotgun to try to limit the damage the skeletons were doing. Already they had lost two of the crew to the undead horde billowing up from the hold.

Taggart skidded to a halt on the corner of Milson and Snapdragon. Before him, he saw O'Malley's, a little watering hole he frequented when his ship docked here. The place was shut down, but that wasn't going to stop him from breaking in to look for weapons, and maybe a drink to calm his frayed nerves.

The door was old, as well as the lock. It took little effort to get it open. Taggart nipped inside and quickly shut the door behind him. A bit too quickly, because the door banged against the threshold. Outside, the wind began to pick up. A faint howling rode the wild current, causing the seaman to shiver with fear. As his eyes got adjusted to the dark, a faint growling came from underneath a table near the door. Taggart backed away slowly from the source. As he did, the dog, a rather large German Shepard, shot out from its resting place to attack the intruder. The sailor grabbed the nearest object he could, a bar tray, and used it as an improvised club. He brought the tray down onto the dog's head, several times, until it yelped and ran into the back of the bar.

“Scout?” Taggart heard a voice come from the kitchen area, “What's wrong boy?” The lights came on, Taggart squinted and blinked as he was temporarily blinded. A bespectacled man, about his age, stood by the bar; a suspicious look on his face.

“Who are you? How did you get in here? I know I locked the front door,” the man said, inching to the phone on the bar.

“My name's Taggart, I picked the lock, and yes, you did lock the front door,” the sailor said as he headed to the adjoining room. His plan may have not been obvious to the newcomer, but he really didn't care. He just wanted to find some sort of a weapon and get back to the ship. Outside, the wind whipped the bar mercilessly, the eerie howling becoming more prominent.

“Where are you going?” the man demanded. “I'm calling the cops!” He started to pick up the phone, but stopped when he heard the intruder's voice.

“Don't bother,” Taggart said, reappearing with a knife in his hand. “That was the first place I went to for help and nobody's there.” Seeing the man blanch, he put the knife away quickly.

“Wh-what do you want?” the man stammered. Taggart walked over to him and the man responded by putting the bar between himself and the sailor.

“I need your help,” Taggart said. “On my ship, we have... a problem. A problem that needs guns to fix.” The other man looked quite unconvinced.

Outside, the unearthly howling rose in timbre as the wind blew, no longer being masked by it. The man blanched sheet white upon hearing the cacophony, it was as if some primal instinct suddenly awoke in his psyche. Something that told him and every fiber of his being to be terrified. Gulping visibly, the man said, “You're telling the truth, aren't you?”

Taggart nodded solemnly. “Would I be standing here talking to you if I honestly wanted to rob the place?” The sailor looked the man over. “What's your name?”

“O'Malley. Dr. Liam O'Malley.”

“A doctor? And you work in a bar?” the sailor incredulously retorted.

“I work here part time to help out my father. He's taking a vacation right now.”

“Well, Dr. O'Malley. Do you have any weapons here in the bar?” Taggart asked.

“Uh, no,” the doctor said, adjusting his glasses. Then, his eyebrows arched, as his face betrayed his recollection of something. He disappeared behind the bar for a moment, reappearing with a small white metal box. “I got a first aid kit,” he said.

“That'll help, but we need weapons,” Taggart reiterated.

“There's a gun store across the street on Drury. Just north of here,” O'Malley said.

“Good, let's go,” the sailor said, heading for the door.

As they both left the store, thunder suddenly crashed, lightning eerily lighting up the leaden skies, causing both men to start and stop in their procession to the gun store. The men looked at each other uneasily for a moment before resuming their march.

Like the bar, the gun store was located in a crumbling building that was more than likely built in the twenties. A faded sign quite banally proclaimed the place as “Rick's Gun Shop”. Inside, the lights were out and it was obvious no one was home. Taggart moved to the door and tested it. Seeing that it was locked, he started to try to jimmy the lock.

“What are you doing?” O'Malley asked Taggart.

“Picking the lock,” Taggart replied, not looking away from his task.

“Shouldn't we try to call Mr. Rick?” O'Malley asked cautiously.

The fiendish howling made its presence known, interjecting itself into the conversation. Taggart stopped and looked at his compatriot.

“Do you want to hang around and wait for Mr. Rick to show up now?” the sailor queried, nodding his head westwards towards the beach. The doctor looked down towards the beach, then back to the sailor.

“I don't think Mr. Rick will mind,” O'Malley said shakily. The sailor smirked.

“I thought not,” Taggart said as he went back to work. After several unsuccessful tries, he became frustrated. Finally, he stood up and muttered, “Screw this.” He forcefully planted his foot into the door. With a groan of metal and the splintering of wood, the door was unseated from the threshold, causing it to lazily open. Grunting approval, Taggart walked in, O'Malley pausing only a moment before accompanying him. “Before you say anything, tell Mr. Rick I'll pay him for the damage and the firearm I'm going to borrow.”

In a glass case near the door, a line of handguns waited for perusal. Taking out his knife, Taggart popped the old lock on the display case and grabbed an old familiar friend, a Glock 23. As fate would have it, underneath the case was a box of .40 caliber ammunition. Taggart quickly loaded the clip with fifteen rounds. “All right, we're good to go. Let's get to my life boat and head back to my ship.”

The men left the store and headed to the west side of the sleepy town, down towards the beach. As they got closer to the shore, a fog began to roll in, a fog that was thick enough to shorten visibility considerably.

“Man, this fog is unusual for this time of year,” O'Malley said, shivering. Up ahead, barely discernible by the streetlights, a form appeared. A hollow, clicking noise signaled its approach. Something about the form bothered Taggart, he couldn't put his finger on it.

The clicking noise got louder, and the form became less amorphous.

Taggart brought the Glock up in both hands and aimed it at the form. “O'Malley, get behind me. Now.” The doctor didn't question, but did as he was told.

The animated skeletal remains shuffled into view, its bony arms rising from its sides when it became aware of its living prey. It no longer shuffled, but broke into a shambling run towards the men.

“Jesus Christ!” O'Malley screamed, backing away from the nightmarish revenant.

Taggart squeezed the trigger several times, the gun barking with each pull. The undead monster fell upon him, unaffected by the bullets, its clawed fingers rending a deep wound in the sailor's right shoulder. Taggart screamed in pain and began to grapple with the skeleton.

“Motherfucker, let's see how you like this!” Taggart spat as he put the muzzle of the Glock to the skeleton's left temple and pulled the trigger. The muzzle flash lit up the skeleton's empty eye sockets like a freakish Jack O' Lantern. Bone splintered as the bullet tore its way outward. The skeleton's jaw became unhinged, going slack, as did the rest of the remains. It fell into a heap and remained still. Taggart stood there, breathing hard with the gun aimed at the remains, adrenaline pumping through his system. He was oblivious to the blood streaming hotly from the wound. He was brought back to the here and now only after repeated recitations of his name by Dr. O'Malley.

“C'mon, Taggart. Let's get that shoulder looked at. Mr. Bones isn't going anywhere.” The doctor gently tugged on the sailor's left arm, who allowed himself to be led away. “My clinic is across the street.” Both men crossed the street and made their way to the clinic's entrance, but O'Malley ended up stopping just near the entrance to tend to Taggart's wound, which was bleeding rather profusely. While he did so, he quipped, “So, that's the 'problem' you were talking about earlier?”

Taggart nodded. He winced when the doctor put antiseptic on the wound and packed it with gauze. A few moments later, the doctor finished with his work. “There, that should be good enough for government work,” he said.

Taggart was about to respond, but both of them became silent when they heard hollow, clicking noises coming from around the corner. His face contorting into an irritated, angry mask, Taggart snapped the autoloader and headed in the direction of Mr. Bones' friend. He turned the corner, brought the gun up, and aimed.

This skeleton was a bit slower than Mr. Bones, seeing that it had a gimp right leg. Like its predecessor, it raised its arms and limped its way to Taggart. It didn't get far.

The gun kicked in Taggart's hands, the bullet striking the dead center of the skeleton's face. Fragments of bone exploded in the air. The skeleton was jerked backward by the force of the blow, and sundered like the previous one; a macabre marionette cut from its strings. Taggart lowered the gun, moved over to the downed skeleton, and picked up the skull. “O'Malley, help me with this, we've got to dump it back into the ocean.”

“Why?” O'Malley asked as he gingerly started picking up the thing's ribcage.

“Like my captain said, 'bones don't float',” Taggart said as he picked more bones.

The two men made short work of cleaning up, dumping the bones into the sea from off a nearby pier. They performed the same ritual in disposing of the first skeleton. After they were finished, the doctor suggested that they should head to the clinic in order for him to better tend to Taggart's wound. The sailor agreed and they headed back to town.

They were walking by the Dizzy Bean, the local cafe, when they heard it. The hollow clicking.

“Aw, come on,” O'Malley said exasperatedly, looking for the source of the noise. He didn't have to look hard, the skeleton staggered out of the fog on their right and made a beeline for them, lunging first at Taggart. The sailor dodged to one side, emptying the remainder of the Glock into the passing fiend. The skeleton shattered like a jigsaw puzzle. The men quickly collected the scattered remains and headed to the pier once more.

After chucking the skull into the sea, Taggart's cell phone went off. He pulled it off his belt and looked at who in the Hell would be calling him. It was Captain Law.

“You still alive?” Taggart asked his captain.

“Yeah, I am. Me and Charter cleaned out the rest of the ship. It goes without saying that I think that the danger's over.”

“Sounds good to me, captain. Are you bringing her in?”

“Nah, with the fog I think'll be easier to wait until morning. Granted, the ship's got a leak, but we can hold on until then.”

“All right, sir. I'll see you then.” Taggart pulled the phone away from his ear and put it back onto his belt.

“All right, Taggart,” the doctor said, “let's get to the clinic.”

“If it's all the same to you, I'd rather have a drink,” Taggart said sheepishly.

O'Malley's face broke into a wide grin. “First round's on me.”


(Solo win – 16 VPs!)
1 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Moritz Eggert
Germany
Munich/Germany
Unspecified
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Kudos for actually finishing this dreadfully boring scenario of a sadly even more boring game and writing a session report that is more enjoyable than all the short stories in all "When Darkness Comes" expansions...
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Trencher for Life
United States
Slidell
Louisiana
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Eggo wrote:
Kudos for actually finishing this dreadfully boring scenario of a sadly even more boring game and writing a session report that is more enjoyable than all the short stories in all "When Darkness Comes" expansions...


Why don't you tell me how you really feel?
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Moritz Eggert
Germany
Munich/Germany
Unspecified
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I meant it exactly like I said - I enjoyed your session report and wished the game was as exciting.
I really wanted to love When Darkness Comes and I made several serious attempts to enjoy and play it - I have nothing against dice rolling and luck factors in an adventure driven game, but the scenario you also describe here was the final straw for me. I remember playing it with my wife - go through town, fight skeleton, pick up bones, throw them on the pile, fight skeleton, pick up bones, throw them on the pile, fight skeleton, pick up bones, throw it on the pile, etc., while rolling endless Yahtzee dice and having the same random events happen to you all the time. When I read the later scenarios and found that they all sounded as dull I sold my set with all expansions.
Of course you are welcome to enjoy the game - this was not meant as flaming, and I really appreciated the work that went into your session report.
When I read it it just reminded me of the disappointment with a game that I really wanted to love so much because it's concept sounded so cool, this is why I wrote it out of a sentimental and probably bitter mood, sorry...
Moritz
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Trencher for Life
United States
Slidell
Louisiana
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Eggo wrote:
I meant it exactly like I said - I enjoyed your session report and wished the game was as exciting.
I really wanted to love When Darkness Comes and I made several serious attempts to enjoy and play it - I have nothing against dice rolling and luck factors in an adventure driven game, but the scenario you also describe here was the final straw for me. I remember playing it with my wife - go through town, fight skeleton, pick up bones, throw them on the pile, fight skeleton, pick up bones, throw them on the pile, fight skeleton, pick up bones, throw it on the pile, etc., while rolling endless Yahtzee dice and having the same random events happen to you all the time. When I read the later scenarios and found that they all sounded as dull I sold my set with all expansions.
Of course you are welcome to enjoy the game - this was not meant as flaming, and I really appreciated the work that went into your session report.
When I read it it just reminded me of the disappointment with a game that I really wanted to love so much because it's concept sounded so cool, this is why I wrote it out of a sentimental and probably bitter mood, sorry...
Moritz


S'okay. The WDC Doctor is in, to deal with your sentimental and bitter needs! laugh
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
joel siragher
United States
silver spring
Maryland
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Rliyen wrote:
Eggo wrote:
I meant it exactly like I said - I enjoyed your session report ....
When I read it it just reminded me of the disappointment with a game that I really wanted to love so much because it's concept sounded so cool, this is why I wrote it out of a sentimental and probably bitter mood, sorry...
Moritz


S'okay. The WDC Doctor is in, to deal with your sentimental and bitter needs! laugh



LOOLLL
I love 'The Geek'. I feel so normal sometimes.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.