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Subject: Composition of the 2 Armies and resulting thoughts. rss

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Philip Thomas
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The French Army consists of 2 Guard, 7 '3' strength Infantry (apart from the Guard), 15 '2' strength Infantry, 3 Heavy Cavalry, 5 '2' strength Cavalry and 3 Artillery.

The Allied Army consists of 3 Guard, 5 '3' strength Infantry (apart from the Guard), 19 '2' strength Infantry, 2 '1' strength infantry. 2 Heavy Cavalry, 6 '2' strength Cavalry, 3 '1' strength Cavalry, and 4 Artillery.

The first thing we notice is that the French army favours quality while the Allies favour quantity. There are 36 French units and 44 Allied units. Moreover the Allies start the (1-day) battle with all their units in the field, while the French have 8 units in Reserve. On the other hand the French have the lead in all types of '3' strength unit apart from the Guard, and they have no '1' strength non-artillery units while the Allies have 5. Since '1' strength infantry or cavalry can't be named as lead attackers their use is somewhat limited: the cavalry can at least feint, but the infantry are more or less only good to increase the numbers in the event of a tie. The Allies have fewer orders than the French, making it difficult to bring their superior numerical strength to bear.

More numbers: The French have 6 Strength points of Guard to 9 Allied, 51 strength points of (non-guard) Infantry to 55 Allied, 19 strength points of Cavalry to 21 Allied, and 3 Artillery to 4 Artillery.

The apparent Allied superiority in Cavalry and Artillery is not entirely real however: the French have more Heavy Cavalry and less weaklings, and in Artillery terms the French fixed artillery battle on top of the Santon (if playing with the optional rule for that locatin) is much more powerful than the typical artillery travelling along with a corps.

That concludes my thoughts for the moment, other comments welcome.
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Philip Thomas
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Erm, yes, my apologies for the maths error, will edit previous post.
 
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Mark Buetow
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A couple things about the one strength infantry: The COULD feint. They just couldn't carry through an attack and be leading pieces. Also, they could defend if they were on the approach. Agreed, they are not strong, but they are more than just numbers!

 
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Philip Thomas
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Yes, they can feint if they are in adjacent locale: 1 strength cavalry can feint from 2 locales away by road and also can retreat without dying.
 
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Rachel Simmons
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Malacandra wrote:
A couple things about the one strength infantry: The COULD feint. They just couldn't carry through an attack and be leading pieces.


A one-strength unit could carry through an attack even though it could not be a leading piece (attacks with no leading pieces are legal). Such an attack could not inflict any losses, but it could still succeed if the defender also had no leading pieces.
 
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Joakim Pihlstrand-Trulp
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Philip Thomas wrote:
The French [...] 15 '2' strength Infantry [...]


It's 16, right?
 
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