Recommend
6 
 Thumb up
 Hide
4 Posts

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Board Game Design » Board Game Design

Subject: Questions for Game Publishers rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
United States
New York
flag msg tools
designer
badge
the difference between a "crowd" and a "mob" is one push
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Just wondering:

What do you consider to be a successful game for yourself?

Is it:
Number of print runs (including the number)?
Number sold (including the number)?
Profit margin? And what is a good per game margin?
Copies in print?
The joy it brings to new players?
Knowing that you were responsible for creating and/or sustaining something worthwhile?
Some other criteria?
A combination of several of these?

Thanks.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jackson Pope
United Kingdom
Newcastle upon Tyne
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Osiris Ra wrote:
Just wondering:

What do you consider to be a successful game for yourself?

Is it:
Number of print runs (including the number)?
Number sold (including the number)?
Profit margin? And what is a good per game margin?
Copies in print?
The joy it brings to new players?
Knowing that you were responsible for creating and/or sustaining something worthwhile?
Some other criteria?
A combination of several of these?

Thanks.

Hiya Osiris,

Personally I go for:
Number sold?
Copies in print?
The joy it brings to new players?
Knowing that you were responsible for creating and/or sustaining something worthwhile?

Though not necessarily in that order

Cheers,

Jack
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Phil Walker-Harding
Australia
Ashfield
NSW
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
As a self-publisher I have no real distribution, so copies sold sort of comes down to who hears about it online and feels like taking a shot on the game, which isn't really a good guage of how 'good' the game is. If I was available widely around the world and was in the public eye, and I sold 200 copies... well that is very different from selling 200 copies through my own humble promotional efforts!

So at this stage I'd say the best guage of success is positive responses from people whose taste I respect (reviewers, close gamer friends) - and also by strangers. This is especially rewarding. When a stranger orders a copy of the game because they were asked to play it at a friend's dinner party, I know they are buying it simply because they enjoyed it.

2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chad Ellis
United States
Brookline
Massachusetts
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I have a bunch of different measures.

As a business owner, profitability is all that really matters. That said, I didn't start my own game company because I thought I was going to make anything like as much money at it as I would have in a different job, even assuming I made money at all! From a personal standpoint, I look at games like an artist would a work of art. I care about my own personal satisfaction with the product but perhaps even moreso I care about how much gaming joy other players have gotten from our products.

That's all really vague, but it's hard to be much more specific than that without spending the whole morning writing up a detailed report of costs, break-evens, etc. As Phil noted, the number of copies a game has to sell isn't a fixed thing -- it depends a ton on the context.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.