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Subject: Corp disintigration and attach moves rss

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Michael Edwards
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Alrighty,

Played my first game - well, first few turns, anyway - of Napoleon's Triumph last night. Wow, while I had read the rules a few times ahead of time, it was still a brain burner trying to get my head around things. Many new concepts to grasp for an old wargamer.

I know for the locals, it helped for me to imagine that an area was not just one "area" with approaches, but to think of the reserve and all the approaches as separate connected boxes, if that makes any sense.

Anyway, on to my main question. It seemed like it was pretty easy for a corp to lose cohesion - units get dropped off to defend an area, units detach to defend approaches or in response to feints, the entire corp detaches if it loses a battle.

Is it really the case that the only way to attach a unit is one single one per turn via the attach moves? So if you, say, move into a local and send folks off to defend three approaches, that corp can't reconstruct for three hours? Or that if a corp of eight is shattered, it would take most of the day to reassemble it? Even including overnight?

It seems that it's an essential element, and perhaps one that is designed to make you commit to defending an area when you start detaching to do so - you seem pretty much stuck there for the rest of the day.

I guess thinking about it, a corp only makes use of two units in the attack, and four in the defense for a single attack.

Another thign - what is the concept behind, when retreating, that a unit on a different approach than the attack taking more losses if the approach it was on is wide? More strung out?

Still getting my brain around it, but looks interesting so far!
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Chanfan wrote:
Alrighty,
I know for the locals, it helped for me to imagine that an area was not just one "area" with approaches, but to think of the reserve and all the approaches as separate connected boxes, if that makes any sense.


It makes perfect sense, and is a useful way to visualize it.

Chanfan wrote:
Alrighty,
Is it really the case that the only way to attach a unit is one single one per turn via the attach moves?


That is indeed the case. Unlike so many games, NT richly rewards a player who keeps fresh formations in reserve. If you do so, and your opponent's corps are scattered, you can run roughshod over him.

Chanfan wrote:

Another thign - what is the concept behind, when retreating, that a unit on a different approach than the attack taking more losses if the approach it was on is wide? More strung out?


I believe that is exactly it. It is tougher to react to an emergency in a coherent way with a widely dispersed unit.

Chanfan wrote:

Still getting my brain around it, but looks interesting so far!


It sounds to me as if you have a remarkably good grasp for a guy who has only played once, Michael!
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Yeah, it's really that rough on the corps! It's brutal in fact. Actually, the more I reflect on it, the terror and fear of the ripping and shredding of corps is what makes me fear and tremble as the game begins! laugh

NT is just so darned tough! The last couple of games I've played, I've played...hhmm...let's say decisively (read: too quickly) and put myself into bad positions. The last two games I've played were lost with scores like 2-0 or even 1-0!!!

Your'e right that corps only attack with, at most, two lead pieces, or defend with, at most four if there are units that counter attack. But here's the thing:

In a tie, with defender in reserve, more units in the corps wins! So actually, you've got a slightly better chance to win if your a larger corps. But when they get into those large locales...watch out! The enemy can spread you thin with annoying little feints that peel away your pieces. It's aggravating and troubling in the extreme!

...and that's why I love it! kiss
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Michael Edwards
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Alright, glad to see that we were interpreting things correctly.
 
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Malacandra wrote:
Your'e right that corps only attack with, at most, two lead pieces, or defend with, at most four if there are units that counter attack.


I find it useful to think of a corps vs. corps 'attack' as something that often transpires over the course of several hours (multiple turns). Those leading pieces are simply the first wave.
 
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