Recommend
3 
 Thumb up
 Hide
2 Posts

10 Days in Asia» Forums » Sessions

Subject: 10 Days in Asia - Session Report rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Greg Schloesser
United States
Jefferson City
TN
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Awhile back, I wrote a review on the “10 Days In” series, with a look at both the USA and Africa games, as well as the original Europa Tour. I updated the review when 10 Days in Europe was released. Looks like I need to make another revision to include the most recent installment in the series, 10 Days in Asia. In the meantime, I’ll refer those interested in learning more about the series to my review:

http://69.13.44.5/etg/viewarticle.php?action=more&articleid=...

Designed by the team of Alan Moon and Aaron Weissblum, 10 Days in Asia uses virtually identical mechanisms as the other games in the series. Aside from the Asian geography, the primary change is the addition of rail lines, which allows travel to any of the countries connected by these lines. Gone is the option of using automobiles to travel from country-to-country, but airplanes and ships are still viable transportation options. Ships travel either the Pacific or Indian Ocean, and can access a multitude of countries.

The objective is the same as other games in the series: arrange a 10-day travel itinerary by connecting countries and proper modes of transportation. The first player to successfully arrange a properly connected itinerary is victorious. Usually, this takes about 15 – 20 minutes, making the game an excellent filler.

The appeal of the game lays in its ease of play, yet challenge of properly arranging the tiles. Another major advantage of the series is its usefulness as an educational tool, particularly for geography students. Not only are the maps useful in learning the location of the various countries, but each country tile lists its capital, population and size. If I were a geography or history teacher, I would certainly attempt to integrate the game into my classrooms. Too few educational games are actually fun to play. The games in the 10 Days series are a notable exception.

Gail, Ryan and I planned our whirlwind tours through Asia, hoping to be the first to complete an itinerary. I managed to piece the tiles together first and claimed the victory.

Ratings: Gail 7, Ryan 6.5, Greg 6.5
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tim Seitz
United States
Glen Allen
VA
flag msg tools
badge
Like water spilled on the ground, which cannot be recovered, so we must die. But God does not take away life; instead, he devises ways so that a banished person may not remain estranged from him. 2 Sam 14:14
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
gschloesser wrote:
If I were a geography or history teacher, I would certainly attempt to integrate the game into my classrooms.


As a kid I learned my geography from Risk and Rise and Decline of the Third Reich. So it works. At least for the "important" countries.

My kids know their US Geography pretty well because of this game, but they much prefer US to Africa, not surprisingly.

To really make this game completely perfect as a teaching tool, I'd kinda like to see web-publishable "updates" to the game as countries change. The base game would need extra blank tiles, and you could download & print new maps and tileoverlays which you could stick on yourself.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.