M D
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Cos Cob
CT
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I remember reading "The Selfish Gene" by Richard Dawkins a while back and was always struck by a reviewer's blurb on the cover that read something along the lines of "the kind of popular science writing that makes the reader feel brilliant!"

Well I've just started playing Twilight Struggle and decided that this is one of the only games I've played that made me feel like I was brilliantly exploiting the mechanics (even though I wasn't). Anyone care to recommend a game that makes them feel similarly?
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Scott Smith
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The last game that gave me that feeling was Napoleon's Triumph. Shaping the battlespace to give an opportunity for either a double artillery attack with a strong follow-on attack or an unexpected Guard attack gives the player an amazing sense of 'genius.'
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Aaron Tubb
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Fuquay Varina
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I know Chess has moments like that, too.
 
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Pete Belli
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History of the World:

Geek: I get to play the Romans this turn? OK.

(10 minutes later)

Geek: Wow! Look at my empire... I'm a genius!

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matthew midgley
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I personally love the result of the mechanic; the scoring track/victory points thingy. With regards to this thread; when there are just one or two points between certain players - that's always a sign a a close-run game.

Nothing sucks worse than trailing along behind, with no hope of capturing the golden flag of victory (And I know! I'm there most weeks!)
 
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Peter
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Citadels when I can read or manipulate the players in the group. ninja
 
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Lacombe
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Hansa can feel this way because of the way the game makes you think out your whole turn ahead of time and then put it into action step-by-step. It's a really tough game to make a "brilliant play" in, actually, but when you manage to do it, boy do you feel smart. Really, really smart.

Blue Moon City is very much like Hansa in the same regard, just due to the immense number of possible actions and card combinations you can play on your turn. Then, you have the option of balancing short-term or long-term gains and majority or contributor bonuses.

RoboRally is so random at times that you something chalk anything good that happens up to your own brilliance in planning ahead for all contingencies, even though it's absolutely not true. This especially occurs when you get run into, but still end up where you meant to all along.

Antike's movement system is so intensive and board-sweeping that you can really accomplish an awful lot on one turn if you do well. It helps with the genius feeling that it takes a whole mess of baby steps to build up the plan. When you see it all come together, it's beautiful.

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Alex Bove
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Shouldn't this be a Geeklist?
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M D
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Cos Cob
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I wanted it to be but I could only add one so I didn't think it worthy.

BTW, I also agree with Citadels. I've only played Jambo a few times, but I'd think there was potential there too.
 
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Doug Faust
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Well, Ingenious makes you yell, "INGENIOUS!!!" whenever you get to 18. After a little while, you might actually start believing it...
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CHAPEL
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Games that I've played most that I've had the most brilliant moments were Java or Samurai
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Mark Crane
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Colosseum tends to build towards a big play on the last turn, which can make you look good if it works.


I've recently won games of Blue Moon City, Perikles, Lost Valley and Ra. This is notable because I never win in our group. In each instance I felt there was an element of scripted-ness or lucky dice rolls/tile draws that snagged me the win, so they weren't that satisfying. I was, however, accused of feigning cluelessness then plunging the dagger, as it were. Sadly, the cluelessness was unfeigned. Actually, the Lost Valley win was the opposite--I just plodded along and did some painfully obvious stuff while everybody's complex game engines imploded.

This raises the question of whether games that have mechanics that make you look like a genius have a noticeably scripted feel to them.
 
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Matt Davis
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I agree with the RoboRally suggestion I had such a moment in a game last night. I was facing away from the flag I was going for and drew nothing but move cards. Yet I managed to use a gear and a turning conveyor belt to pull a U-turn and get back in position where I only needed 2 cards to touch the flag next turn. It's very easy to completely screw up your turn, but you can also often do something brilliant.
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Mary Weisbeck
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I think games with the action-point system like Trias, Torres, and Tikal can give you that feeling when you string together the right combination of actions.
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Less snark is my goal.
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Blokus, Blokus Trigon, and Gemblo all have that feeling I think, when you spot a place to put a piece and suddenly open up a broad new region for yourself. Likewise if one of your opponents concedes and you can see where he could put one of his pieces.
 
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Flying Arrow
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I think CCGs are great at this. Finding two or three cards out of hundreds or thousands that work great together that no one thought of yet...
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Todd McCorkle
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Anderson
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Most of the Gipf series has moments where I make a move and feel smug that I set a devious trap for my opponent.

Unfortunately, my opponent usually makes a counter move that shows just how stupid that move really was.
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howl hollow howl
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Oregon
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Tongiaki. If you chain a bunch of migrations together, you can have a really long turn (sometimes returning to an island multiple times, giving the illusion of perpetual motion), completely change the board, and devastate your opponents' positions.
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Russ Williams
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Wrocław
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Go has such moments, especially in tactical situations like the life and death of a group. There's a Japanese Go term "tesuji" commonly used also among Western players to describe such pleasing clever plays.
http://senseis.xmp.net/?Tesuji
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Tigris and Euphrates is a candidate. During multi-leader conflicts there are often interesting and unplanned consequences.
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Simon Lundström
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Täby
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RoboRally comes to mind.
 
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Jesper Rugård Jensen
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Attika when you get the victory by a series of carefully thought out steps - using the amphoras and empty stacks to connect two temples that your opponnents thought they had blocked.

 
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David Bush
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Radiant
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Zimeon wrote:
RoboRally comes to mind.


Yes, I recall inadvertently double bluffing an opponent, and taking the obvious route when he could have obviously shot me down if I tried it. The look on my opponent's face when he saw my choice made me feel like Sherlock Holmes when he did something similar to Moriarty, although a more accurate description of my play would have been clueless and lucky.

Of course any 2P abstract with lots of tactics can provide this feeling as well.
 
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Chester
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ChemEng wrote:
The last game that gave me that feeling was Napoleon's Triumph. Shaping the battlespace to give an opportunity for either a double artillery attack with a strong follow-on attack or an unexpected Guard attack gives the player an amazing sense of 'genius.'


I hope you've played again since whooping me. But I agree totally, NT gives you a chance to deduce what the opponents' pieces are, make a plan and pull the trigger. Similarly, you can 'hide' pieces that the opponent doesn't expect to be facing and give nasty surprises. Either way, there is a lot of poker going on, which when it all comes together feels very smart.

(On the other hand, you can feel like a chump when your opponent sucks out on the River.)
 
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Twinge
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Oregon came to mind for me. I've played only one game where we were all new players and I pulled one of these types of moves.

I was trying to figure out how the churches were useful when compared to the other stuff - mines gave you fairly direct points, as did the ports, etc. But churches only gave points based on how many little cowboy meeples there were around them - so if you placed a church and put 1 guy next to it, you got a measly 1 point. Then another player drops their guy down next to it and snags 2 points, etc. Even if they were all your own guys, it'd take way too many guys to break even compared to other buildings

But wait! I suddenly realized you can also place buildings next to already placed meeples and score that way. While the implications of this were pretty obvious for most of the buildings, the church was a little different. I started lagging behind all the other players, partially keeping up from bonuses from chaining the meeples together and points from some of my other buildings. Then on the last turn I dropped a church right in the middle of a bunch of my guys and rocketed into the lead. I think the final scores were something like 70-53-51-50.
 
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