Terence Co
flag msg tools

Here is a short info on the game:

220 counters(around), 1 area= 1 square mile, GMT complex scale: 3. Playing
time: 3-6 hours.1 unit= battalion(companies for Japanese tank units). 13
turns, 1 turn = 1 day. Rulebook 6 pages(ATO mag condensed), actual game
rules minus the intro, designer notes(4 pages). Charts 2 pages.

Uses a modified storm over arnhem/Stalingrad system.


Japanese major victory: Japanese player captures the two +3 Taierzhuang town
areas or the three areas behind the Grand Canal at any point in the game.
and the capturing units must be in supply.

Japanese great victory: Destroy all KMT units in the game.

KMT Chinese major victory: If the Japanese player does not win before the
end of the last turn(turn 13), then the Chinese player wins a major victory.

KMT Chinese Great victory: Destroy all Japanese units in the game.

Now here is the explained turn sequence of the game:

1. Each players randomly draws TCMs(tactical chit markers) up to their own
army's maximum TCM hand size for the turn from their own TCM cups.

Now imagine TCMs to be similiar to strategem chits(Joe Miranda games) or

They represent extra tactical options open to both sides. Both sides have a
maximum TCM hand size(which is the limit of chits one can have) and they
gradually go down for the Japanese and go up for the KMT as the game goes
and this represents the improving KMT strategic situation and worsening
Japanese one(the Japanese supply lines during the battle was tenous at best
and was constantly being threatened by increasing Chinese reinforcements
from the flanks and local guerilla actions. The Japanese also had a tenous
command and control during the battle made worse as the supply and commu
lines got cut or really threatened.

The TCM chits are the two hearts of the game(the other one is the action
impulse system). The TCM chits facilitate either unique actions when
played(Banzai's, Night attacks etc.) or combat help/modifiers(Engineers,
dare to die etc.).

There aer 16 Japanese and 16 KMT TCMs in the game.

2. Reinforcement phase: Both players starting on turn 2, roll for and
receive and deploy reinforcements on their respective deployment zones on
the map.

For the KMT, starting turn 2, you roll 2d6, if the result is less or equal
to the current turn #, you receive 2d6 worth of reinforcement randomly drawn
from the KMT reinforcement cup. A 2 is always a success, a 12 is always a

For the Japanese, starting turn 2, he can discard a TCM chit and roll 2d6
just like the KMT player but receives 1d6 reinforcements(not randomly drawn
from a cup)

The KMT reinforcements are randomly drawn since KMT reinforcements are more
varied in quality than the Japanese.

These reinforcements for both sides are deployed on their respective
reinforcement zones which serves as entry zones for reinforcements to the
map and the two Japanese deployment zones serve as Japanese supply
depots(where Japanese supply lines originate, KMT units are always in
supply). Once deployed to their zones, they cannot be changed(moved to
another zone, the KMT and the Japanese were preety rigid in their

3. Roll for random events, there are 8 random events in the game from Fuel
Shortages to meddling of Generalissimo Chang Kai Shek to Japanese air drops.

4. Both players roll for initiative starting turn 2 to see who goes first in
the upcoming action impulse phase. Turn 1 the Japanese always gets the

5. Action impulse phase: Both players alternate player action turns starting
with the one who has initiative.

In a player action, the phasing player either:

Picks one, some or all his readt units in an area and they either move or
fire. These units flip to unready status after doing an action.

If you played Storm Over Arnhem, that is the same combat system. 2d6 +
firepower rating of units firing + combat modifiers minus the highest
defense rating of a unit in the area + defensive rating of an area(if
applicable) = total damage to the defenders.

The defender distributes damage to his units. For a ready unit= 1 point =
unit flips to unready, 2 points = unit retreats to an adjacent area and
flips, 3 points = units is destroyed. For unready units a step down, 1 point
= unit retreats to an adjacent area, 2 points= units is destroyed.

Units cannot retreat to areas with enemy units in them. Units which cannot
retreat are destroyed.

He also can play a action TCM and does what is said on the chit description.


The play alternate until both players pass consecutively then the phase

As you can see, very interactive, just like Storm Over Arnhem/Stalingrad.

6. End of turn phase:

TCMs may be discarded.

All unready units in supply are flipped back to the ready status. Japanese
have to trace a supply line(areas with at least 1 Japanese unit in them(who
is securing the Supply line) to the Japanese deployment zones(supply depot).
The KMT units are always in supply.

Turn marker is advanced to the next turn.

There are also several optional rules in the game along with some special
rules(such as human wave attacks etc.).

From the playtesting seems that the game is very interactive, easy to learn
and play, playable within an evening and balanced and tense. At the start
it seems that the Japanese have a massive advantage in firepower as they
advance towards Taierzhuang but the longer the game goes, the Chinese get
stronger as they get more TCMs and reinforcements and the Japanese get
weaker as their TCM level goes down and they start getting whittled down.

Expect the game to be really bloody. BTW, the Chinese outnumber the Japanese
by a factor of 2.5 to 3 to 1 but the Japanese units are strong and have
strong TCM chits but have to watch their supply lines and the growing threat
of Chinese reinforcements coming in from all sides.

Balanced and tense as they say.

Game is preety solid and is undergoing development to make the rules clearer

 Thumb up
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.