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Subject: Good C# book? Also: XNA, video game design, and me rambling rss

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Kevin J
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Can anyone here recommend a good book for learning C#? I learned Java in University and have a minor in Computer Science, so my programming fundamentals are pretty decent, but I have not applied it at all the last few years and I need a good refresher. I also never learned much front-end stuff like GUI or much else besides string inputs, so anything that offers an approach to that sort of stuff would be good as well.

I ask about C# because it is what's used by the XNA platform, and I think I might like to tinker with it in my spare time. Every now and then, I get it in my head that I can make a good video game if I apply myself, and I'm in the middle of one of those passing fancies at the moment.

Is there anyone here who works in the video game industry? I'd love to hear any advice you have for someone who might be interested in such a career.
 
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Gil Hova
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I used Jesse Liberty's O'Reilly C# book to learn it. It only has a single chapter on GUI, though. Liberty prefers to focus on the back-end code, working with the command-line for output.

Still, it's clean, consice, and thorough.

EDIT: I see he has a .NET 3.0 book out, but I don't know what's different.
 
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Steve Wagner
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IngredientX wrote:
I used Jesse Liberty's O'Reilly C# book to learn it. It only has a single chapter on GUI, though. Liberty prefers to focus on the back-end code, working with the command-line for output.

Still, it's clean, consice, and thorough.

EDIT: I see he has a .NET 3.0 book out, but I don't know what's different.


3.0 isn't much different from 2.0. Just some more stuff added in it.
 
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howl hollow howl
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I would go beyond that and advise that a new person to C# stick with a 2.0 textbook (not 1.0, not 3.0). After you learn the basic langugage features (including .NET features like Generics), I would study the CLR library to see what tools you have available to do common things like threading, file management, etc.

I would only jump directly to 3.x if you are a programming language nut (in the academic sense). The only thing I wouldn't waste time on prior to 3.x is networking, as 3.5 features like WCF change things considerably (although a baseline understanding of 2.0 remoting might not hurt).

I am of the opinion that most of the new C# features in 3.x are best left alone, especially in software that will likely need to be maintained by a different person.
 
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Steve Wagner
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Dave wrote:
I would go beyond that and advise that a new person to C# stick with a 2.0 textbook (not 1.0, not 3.0). After you learn the basic langugage features (including .NET features like Generics), I would study the CLR library to see what tools you have available to do common things like threading, file management, etc.

I would only jump directly to 3.x if you are a programming language nut (in the academic sense). The only thing I wouldn't waste time on prior to 3.x is networking, as 3.5 features like WCF change things considerably (although a baseline understanding of 2.0 remoting might not hurt).

I am of the opinion that most of the new C# features in 3.x are best left alone, especially in software that will likely need to be maintained by a different person.


Good points. I haven't done much in 3.0 or 3.5, and I really don't think I need to until everyone's ready to move to that point.
 
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