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Subject: What weight of card stock to use for tuck boxes? rss

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Kevin Rutherford
United States
Perrysburg
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I've never tried it before but I'm thinking about starting to print out some the many tuck boxes for my games with cards. As a result I'd like to know what is the minimum weight of card stock to use (i.e. #70, #80, #90, etc.). Also, is this stuff easy to find at places like Office Max or Office Depot or do you recommend an online store.

Thanks
 
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Jae
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Bryan
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I use 110#.
I find it exceptionally sturdy and it really isn't that much more expensive when you buy large lots. I get the 250 pack from Office Depot.

It also happens to be an excellent weight for making World Works models.
As well, it is the best weight for greetings cards.
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Robin Ashby
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Kemptville
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Short Answer: At least approx. 200gsm (grams per square meter)

Long Answer: # or 'pound' or 'lb' is a useless measurement, it's relative and changes depending on the standard used, for example, 80 lb cover stock is actually heavier than 110 lb card stock. Look for stuff in gsm (gm2, grams per square meter), you'll need al least 200 gsm (I might recommend 270 gsm photo paper, but I haven't used it yet, only 200 gsm cardstock), but the more the merrier, you'll probably also want to consider laminating (gluing) 2 sheets together for extra thickness.

Any big-box office supply store should have what you need.
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Kevin Rutherford
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I guess now as a follow-up should I be using card stock or cover stock? If cover stock then what weight is good?
 
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Isaac Citrom
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I use 110 lb card stock which is readily available everywhere. This cardstock is also very useful for many other applications such as play aids and many other crafty things.

However, I find that 110 lb is a little bit too thin. There is another weight which I would rather use, 145 lb card stock, but I find it impossible to find except online.

Art stores also have heavier weight card stock but the products I found were very expensive.

So, I use 110 lb as a compromise. But, you can readily tell that these tuck boxes are not quite as sturdy as the ones professionally made.

A further note: The professionally made tuck boxes are not necessarily a heavier weight, though they might be. However, these tick boxes are "plasticized" on the printed sides which makes them sturdier. This is the same stuff that us used on cards. You'll notice that professionally made playing cards are quite sturdier/stiffer than homemade 110 lb cards, though they are thinner. This is because of this plastification. I use the term plastification but I think it is just some kind of a coating. The cards and tuckboxes are not actually laminated (or are they?).
.
 
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Penny Osborn
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Richmond
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An easy alternative which you can get anywhere is poster board. Just make a template and then cut them out with an exacto knife. You can get poster board at any office supply store.
 
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Paul Newsham
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I've just made my first tuckboxes from BGG, and didn't have any card to hand. Being an impatient wotnot I printed them on paper and laminated them. then cut out and stuck using double sided sticky tape - excellent and very hardy. I'm happy with these.
 
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Robert Manning
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tigerAspect wrote:
Long Answer: # or 'pound' or 'lb' is a useless measurement, it's relative and changes depending on the standard used, for example, 80 lb cover stock is actually heavier than 110 lb card stock.

QFT.

Here's a link to a table showing different types of paper with their Equivalent Weights: http://www.paper-paper.com/weight.html#chart (scroll up from the table for definitions, down for other information).

edit: transposition.
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Helen Holzgrafe
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Happy Valley
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As a designer of a lot of these tuckboxes I thought I'd give my two cents:

I personally like using double sided matte photo paper (epson is my favorite). The graphics come out crisp and not fuzzy. The paper is actually very strong. Photo papers are specially coated and that coat is pretty tear proof. You also do not need to do all that scoring to fold properly with this paper, it takes creases very easily making box construction very fast. My boxes are all designed with this paper in mind. It's found easily at Office Max and all the other big stationers.

My printer won't even print well on most cardstock. The ink just pools up and rolls off. My printer is an HP All-in-One.

My mom has printed a bunch of my tuckboxes on just ordinary printer paper and I have been most surprised that that works quite well indeed, too. They have lasted well and not torn!

-Helen
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Ben Wanless
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I couldn't find any card stock at the local target so I x-acto'd the tuck boxes out of manila folders. They seemed like they would be too flimsy at first, but once you slide the cards in they look pretty professional.
 
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Subhan Michael Tindall
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the heaviest weight your printer will handle comfortably. Heavier = more durability
 
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Channing Faunce
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"Bristol" drawing paper, this is the type not a brand, is available at most art/craft stores. It is listed as 100 lb./260 gsm on the front, but is ~50% heavier/thicker than 110 lb. cardstock available at OfficeMax, for instance. One problem, the pages are 9x12, so they need to be trimmed down to fit a printer.
 
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