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Subject: How does one know what constitutes a "fair trade"? rss

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Moshe Callen
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μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος/ οὐλομένην, ἣ μυρί᾽ Ἀχαιοῖς ἄλγε᾽ ἔθηκε,/...
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So far, I have not participated in BGG's trade options, although I've used the marketplace. Right now, I'm really just building my collection to the way I want it, but I will commonly look at people's trade lists and have at least THOUGHT about participating.

Assuming I decide to do so, how do I know what I'm offering [or being offered for that matter] is a "fair trade"? For example, the only game I'd be likely to trade right now is an unplayed Western copy of Xiangqi; I basically opened the box, looked at it and looked at the set's rules presentation. Now, as a gamer [rather than a collector] I don't really have unplayed games other than this and the only reason this is unplayed is because I have a traditional Xiangqi set which I much prefer and which was given to me at the same time as this one. So, I'm not sure of its value. What would then be a "comparable" game to this in trade and more importantly how would I know?
 
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Mike Bourgeois
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I don't know that there is a reasonable trade value you can put to your item. If someone wants it and they have something you want then at least you've got the start of the trade. Condition, value, edition, Publisher and all make an item more or less valuable to another player.

Sorry, not what you're really looking for in your query but it's the best I can think of as I don't really think there is a 'fair' answer to your 'fair trade' question.

good luck
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Moshe Callen
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ἄνδρα μοι ἔννεπε, μοῦσα, πολύτροπον, ὃς μάλα πολλὰ/ πλάγχθη, ἐπεὶ Τροίης ἱερὸν πτολίεθρον ἔπερσεν./...
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μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος/ οὐλομένην, ἣ μυρί᾽ Ἀχαιοῖς ἄλγε᾽ ἔθηκε,/...
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Thanks anyway, although maybe someone else has something more specific.
 
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Wulf Corbett
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If both of you want what the other guy has more than the thing you have, it's a fair trade. There's really no more to it.
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Jason Tuttle
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whac3 wrote:
Thanks anyway, although maybe someone else has something more specific.


About the most specific advice I can give is a combination of eBay/marketplace/online retailer price average + shipping costs + how much you really want something.

Every item has a different value, especially if it is out of print, that adds to the "value" of a trade. Where you've gotta ship can have a huge impact on the "value" of a trade. If I can ship something inside the states in a flat rate box and someone else wants the same item shipped to them in Antarctica with me paying the shipping price, the value of the in states shipping iteme goes way up. Then there's the, in my opinion, unquatifiable want "value" to add in there. Right now I REALLY want a copy of Ta Yü, at the same time I REALLY want a copy of Age of Steam. If I were to be offered a trade for either item with me sending off the same thing to the other person, I honestly thing I'd just have to flip a coin. Now if there was a for sure re-print date for AoS, I'd probably take Ta Yü ASAP.

Just my opinions of course and you know what they say about opinions. Ten people will probably have ten different opinions of the value of ten trades. It all depends on how badly you want a copy of the game you're looking for in the end.

Good luck in all your trades, it's a great way to get what you see to be crap out of your collection and get something, no matter how small the value, in return.
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Thomas Eastside, Esq.
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If it's in print, I generally use eBay/online shop value to roughly determine what constitutes a fair trade.

In the event it's out of print, I'll use eBay value. If that's not available, I'll use BGG marketplace value.
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Jack K
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Dreadnaut wrote:
If it's in print, I generally use eBay/online shop value to roughly determine what constitutes a fair trade.

In the event it's out of print, I'll use eBay value. If that's not available, I'll use BGG marketplace value.


I think that's a pretty sound approach, but the problem with the BGG marketplace value is that there's no information available on different editions and that can make a large difference. Perfect examples of this that spring to mind are the games Acquire and Cosmic Encounter. Some versions are worth far more (or far less, depending upon your perspective) than others. But there's a forum here for game valuations where you can describe your game, and perhaps supply a picture, and someone might be able to give you an idea.
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George Kinney
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Technically, the question has already been answered, whatever makes both sides of the trade happy is fair.

Usually that means taking the cash value of the game and shipping cost into consideration, plus any differential you might add/subtract based on your personal desire for the other game. At all times its a personal valuation, there is no 'official' way to determine it.

In this case, Xiang-Qi sets, being a public domain game like Chess, Checkers, Backgammon, etc., aren't hard to find. You'd have to be a lot more specific about its composition for anyone to guess what it is worth.

I can go the chinese oddity store at the mall and pick up a set (Wooden disks, paper 'board') for as little as $4. A nicer set, maybe engraved, nicely laquered pieces, wooden board, could be $30+.
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Dave Lartigue
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For me it's simple. If I have something that's doing nothing but taking up space on a shelf and the other guy is offering something I want to play, I'll trade. I really don't care about the "value" of it -- especially in cases where the item I'm trading was free.
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Chad Egbert
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When both parties are satisfied with a trade, then I call it fair.
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Brian Morris
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I try not to worry to much about balance in terms of price to much. You are rarely going match dollar for dollar on a trade so you have to make a judgment call. While you should know the value of the games involved and there's nothing wrong with that being a factor in your decision on making a trade, unless it's extremely lopsided it shouldn't be the main deciding factor.
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Dan Owsen
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There's no harm in offering a trade, so make an offer for what you think it is worth. The worst thing that can happen is they reject it.

I've offered a few trades, had them rejected, I rejected the counter-offers. No big deal.
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tim
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The worst thing is to not reply. I have made a lot of what I consider fair trade requests and they simply get ignored. If your going to put things in the system for trade at least have the common courtesy to reply to a trade request.
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Heckle Jekyll
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Figure out the FMV (Fair market value)

I'd not try to get too complicated in figuring these things out - stick with the simple - determine how much would cost you to purchase a copy of Xiangqi. A fair trade would be an equivalent valued game in return. Adjust for wear and tear, shipping, etc.

If you cannot find the FMV of Xiangqi then start tracking copies of Xiangqi selling on ebay by marking the "Watch this item" in your My ebay account and this should give you a good indication of its FMV.

It looks like there are quite a few copies selling on ebay.
 
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Embark
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The simplest answer was the best one.

I always ask myself "Do I want that game more than I want this one?" If yes then it's fair to me.



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Burster of Bubbles, Destroyer of Dreams.
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Another source of research might be to look at math trades and see what was in the chain before and after the item. However, I suspect there are rather more outlying data points in math trades than elsewhere.

There's also a difference between a "fair trade" (anything where both parties are satisfied) and a "reasonable offer" (where the person getting the offer isn't likely to feel that the offer is wasting their time.)
 
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