Sean Chick (Formerly Paul O'Sullivan)
United States
New Orleans
Louisiana
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Fag an bealac! Riam nar druid ar sbarin lann! Cuimhnigidh ar Luimnech agus feall na Sassonach! Erin go Bragh! Remember Limerick! Remember Ireland and Fontenoy!
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Well, I'm afraid it'll have to wait. Whatever it was, I'm sure it was better than my plan to get out of this by pretending to be mad. I mean, who would have noticed another madman round here?
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This was my first complete solo session in which I learned the rules of the game. The results were surprising enough to be worthy of a session report.

Belgium's Agony
German First army attacks the Belgian Army. King Albert decides to make a stand near Louvain and the results are disastrous; the Belgians are nearly wiped clean off the map. Yet enough of them remain to concern Moltke, head of the German general staff, and he orders von Kluck, head of first army, to send two corps to crush the remaining Belgians and seize Antwerp. Meanwhile the French and British are driven out of of their positions at Mons and Charleroi. Maudbauge is put under seige.
The Belgian fortress of Namur falls.
Further south Joffre, head of the French army, orders a drive on the Germans in the Vosges Mountains. The attack fails, but forces the Germans to commit their reserves to the area.

French Counteroffensives
Joffre continues his attack into the Vosges, while Kluck strikes into France but cannot defeat the stalwart British boys of the BEF. Yet the French attack into the Ardennes fails, and the Germans manage to open a gap between the BEF and the French 5th Army, driving a wedge between the two. The Kaiser's legions are now at St. Quentin. Moltke is victory drunk, for both Antwerp and Maudbauge have fallen to assault. The flanks are weak though, and in a furious counterattack the German 2nd and 3rd armies find themselves out of supply!

The Battle of St. Quentin
Given the new crisis in France, Moltke does not send any men east to confront Russia and all efforts are put into saving 2nd and 3rd army. German 1st and 4th armies attack but cannot win the day. Then 2nd army makes a desperate attack on the French 5th Army and breaks the encirclement; disaster has been averted but at high cost.
Joffre, noting the destruction of 5th army at St. Quentin, the continued stalemate in the Vosges, and a failed attack on Saarburg, calls a general retreat.
The eastern defenses of Verdun are seized.

The Plunge to Paris
The Germans, reinforced and reinvigorated, plunge to Paris. First Kluck strikes at the small French 9th Army, massed at St. Pol to threaten the German flank. The French successfully skirmish and avoid destruction; when Kluck attacks the BEF north of Paris he is once again out done by skilled delaying actions. Although the Germans press to the gates of Paris they fail to scatter the Allies before they can coalescence. Despite these Allied victories Joffre remains worried; he orders four corps to move from the frontier defenses to Paris. They are put under 3rd Army.

Glory and Disaster
Attacks by 1st, 2nd, and 4th armies on the Paris defenses come up short. Moltke, in a moment of frustration, orders the frontier armies to attack the French and destroy their defenses. From Verdun to Charmes a massive battle erupts and the French come out victorious but battered. Moltke, cracking under pressure, orders a general retreat and resigns in favor of Falkenhayn.

The Battles for Luxembourg and Metz
Following the German withdrawal Joffre decides to pursue his original design: an offensive into Germany. 3rd Army is switched east. The French wreck German forces in Luxembourg, but an invasion of Germany comes up short, leading the French to switch to an attack on Metz. The Germans throw everything into Metz, and while victorious, they fail to destroy the French. The French 3rd Army slips out and then invades Germany in the gap created between Luxembourg and Metz. Trier is attacked and her fortifications reduced.

The Kaiser Will Have No More Bloodshed!
The Trier fortifications fall, causing immense panic in Germany. On September 19, 1914 the Kaiser calls for an armistice!

Conclusion
This is a tense and exciting game. Even though I was playing it solo I had no idea how things would turn out. Having just finished The Guns of August I can safely say that in this game Ted Raicer captured the excitement of the opening months of World War I in Western Europe.
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Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
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Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
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Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
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Good report! I have also played this solo and it is very enjoyable and tense.
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David G. Cox Esq.
Australia
Lighthouse Beach
NSW
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Do what you can, with what you've got, where you are.
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gittes wrote:
Having just finished The Guns of August I can safely say that in this game Ted Raicer captured the excitement of the opening months of World War I in Western Europe.


You had just finished the book or the game of the same name?

 
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Sean Chick (Formerly Paul O'Sullivan)
United States
New Orleans
Louisiana
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Fag an bealac! Riam nar druid ar sbarin lann! Cuimhnigidh ar Luimnech agus feall na Sassonach! Erin go Bragh! Remember Limerick! Remember Ireland and Fontenoy!
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Well, I'm afraid it'll have to wait. Whatever it was, I'm sure it was better than my plan to get out of this by pretending to be mad. I mean, who would have noticed another madman round here?
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Book.
 
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