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New World: A Carcassonne Game» Forums » Reviews

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Ryan Barnard
United States
Washington
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New World arrived yesterday afternoon. Unfortunately, my wife and I had a large group of people come over last night for a BBQ, so we were busy cleaning up the house. After people left and after we got the house cleaned up, it was already almost time to go to bed. But we had been excited about it up to this point, so we decided to give it a shot.

Oddly enough, the game is very close to Carcassonne! You start with the east coast of the "new World" and start building north, south, and west. You build roads, cities, and farms (a monastery, using original Carcassonne terminology), and they are all scored the same way as before...with the exception that roads tiles might have a trading post alongside the road. If you complete that road, then you get 1 point for each road tile, and 2 points for each trading post.

Scoring trappers (farmers, in the original game) is a bit different. You look to see who owns a "plain" by seeing who has the most trappers on it. When you determine who owns the plain, then you count up all the cute little animal icons that are within the plain.

The other huge twist to the game are the Surveyors. There are two surveyors that start on the east coast. As you complete a feature (road, city, farm), they begin moving west, one surveyor moving one column at a time. If you have any meeples east of a surveyor when it moves, then it is cleared off the board. So, you have to build things quickly! For example, I was working on a really long road with trading posts and my wife completed a city. The surveyor moved, and I lost my road. The next person to get a road piece can now place it back on that road and claim it...but only until the surveyor moves again. So we found ourselves fighting over partially completed cities and roads and continually losing it. It was a pretty interesting twist.

Pros
It's a fun game. You definitely feel pressure to complete things a lot quicker than you otherwise would in the original Carcassonne. It's fun fighting over incompleted features because the surveyor keeps knocking your meeples off. The artwork on the tiles looks pretty good. We felt the game was more localized than Carcassonne (ie, with two players, we were placing tiles a lot closer to each other. In the original game, we generally build in our own areas and don't run into each other very often. That's not the case here).

Cons
There's a lot of unclear or unstated rules:
* what happens if your surveyors are on the western most tiles and need to move west again? Do they go off the board, or just not move. If they don't move, does that mean eastern Meeples don't get cleared out?
* Can you build to the north and south of the game board?
* How do you score a trading post at the end of the game?
* Do you move a surveyor after scoring each feature, or all features? Ie: You put down a tile that ends a road and a town. Do you move two surveyors, or one? If two, then in which order do you score the features?

When rules aren't clear, you don't have as much fun. Because you're left the whole time thinking "Are we doing this right?" So that caused the game to be less fun than it probably will be once we get it figured out.

Another con is that it's very very difficult to complete a farm (monastery). In original Carcassonne, I love drawing the monastery tile. Now, in New World, I am disappointed. I think we were only able to complete two of them in the game, and that was because we were playing nicely with each other. it'd be very easy to prevent people from completing them.

In Conclusion
We liked the game, but it's not amazing. It brings an interesting twist to the game, and it seems faster paced. I also liked how we were forced to play closer to each other than we normally do. It caused us to play a bit more aggressively than normal. The unclear rules are disappointing, but not terrible. You can just come up with some house rules to cover the unclear parts. I bet we will play it every so often, but go back to the original Carcassonne with Traders and Builders after the newness wears off.
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Keith Creighton
United States
Decatur
IL
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According to Jay from Rio Grande...

Nitecrawler wrote:
There's a lot of unclear or unstated rules:
* what happens if your surveyors are on the western most tiles and need to move west again? Do they go off the board, or just not move. If they don't move, does that mean eastern Meeples don't get cleared out?

The surveyors do not move. They stay on that westernmost tile until a new column is started and another scoring takes place. If meeples are placed in a column east of the surveyors they are cleared off when a scoring takes place even if the surveyor does not move.

Nitecrawler wrote:
* Can you build to the north and south of the game board?

Yes (although I like it much better if you cannot.)

Nitecrawler wrote:
* How do you score a trading post at the end of the game?

Same as in game...two points apiece.

Nitecrawler wrote:
* Do you move a surveyor after scoring each feature, or all features? Ie: You put down a tile that ends a road and a town. Do you move two surveyors, or one? If two, then in which order do you score the features?

The player playing can choose the order of scoring and the subsequent moving. In your example you could score the road and move one of the surveyors and then score the town and move the other. That way the scorer can move the surveyors to his or her greatest advantage.
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Daryl Wilks
United States
Peshastin
Washington
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Ryan,
Welcome to BGG and thanks for the review. I need to have you teach me this game at CamasCon.
See you in November!
Daryl
 
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