Recommend
208 
 Thumb up
 Hide
59 Posts
1 , 2 , 3  Next »   | 

Dominion» Forums » Reviews

Subject: Dominion - A Detailed Analysis rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: DomCG [+] [View All]
Sheamus Parkes
United States
Carmel
Indiana
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb

Look mom! It's a BGG Phenomenon.
No it's not dear, that's just "Hype".


Well, is it? That's really the question isn't it? And luckily, the answer is.... *drum roll please* ... up to you of course! Luckily unlike some recent hits (*cough* Agricola *cough*) this game costs under $30 and plays in well under an hour. Meaning? You'll easily get a chance to try it yourself.

For myself though, it is living up to the hype.

(Review Caveat, I haven't gotten in my desired number of games for a review, but I hadn't seen any full detailed reviews yet, so I thought I'd do it anyway.)


0. Description

Of course this game is about building your Dominion. At least, I think that's the theme. Really it's about building your own card deck on the fly. You start with a small deck. Then on your turn:

A is for Action: You may play one action card.
B is for Buy: Then you spend any money in your hand and buy one new card.
C is for Clean-Up: Then you put everything you touched into your discard pile. (Yes everything, you don't have any "permanents" or other nonsense.)
D is for Draw: Then you go ahead and draw 5 cards for your next turn.

Rinse and repeat.

(Thanks to Dale Yu for the novel ABCD of rules.)

Gimmicks:

Your draw deck will run out frequently. When it does, just shuffle up your discard pile (With all your new goodies.)
The final score is the sum of the VP cards in your deck. However, when you draw VP cards, they do jack shit.
Also, many action cards give you additional actions, so you tend to be able to play more than one action card per turn.
So you're balancing money cards, action cards and VP cards in your deck.


Look at all those cards! And the somewhat cool insert.


1. Analysis Paralysis / Downtime

Lets start with the big one. Is there any downtime? Well, no not generally. Once you've played a few hands, the card play goes *quick*. How quick? So quick you won't have had time to shuffle up your deck before your turn gets back to you.

However, there is one glitch. You have a whole buffet of cards to purchase. The game comes with 25 different action cards, (in sets of 10), and only 10 of these actions cards will be available each game (meaning there will be 10 stacks of 10 action cards each to purchase every game.) Especially for the new players, you're going to have to constantly look over what cards are available when you make a purchase. (In addition to the action cards, you can always purchase more money cards or VP cards as well, those are in every game.) So for the first few games, expect people to stop and smell the roses when they go to spend their money.

Beyond the pause at purchasing? This game frickin' flies. It *begs* to be played multiple times. Heck, the player order balancing mechanism counts on it. The game end can trigger on any player's turn, so an equal number of turns are not guaranteed. To make up for this the start player for the next game is to the left of the prior winner.


2. Frequency of Meaningful Decisions

At first, the play of your action cards may take a little thought, but you get over that reasonably quickly. You might have occasional decisions during card play, but don't count on it. However, every card purchase seems to be a very important and very difficult decision. The only exception is when you can afford the "game enders", (those being the 6 VP cards that everyone gobbles during the end game). Other than that, it's always a tough choice on what to purchase. How does that work? Well, the cards may not be all balanced, but no card is really self beneficial. In other words, almost every card brings declining marginal value with each additional copy. (There are exceptions, but not many.)

Also, all the action cards can work together in some very delicious combos. And some of the action cards let you acquire additional cards from the purchase area, so these decisions are just like a purchasing decision.

Now excuse me as I bring out my MtG geek:

You really need to bring balance with your deck. You need some card draw to get card advantage. You need cantrips (draw without using your action) to add some velocity to your deck. At the same time, you need some actual power cards to help you make the big purchases. And at the same time, you don't want to get too much fluff in there to dilute your power. Since you're constantly adding to your deck, you need to keep all these factors in balance. And the real kicker is that you're pretty much trashing your deck towards the end game, filling it with worthless VP cards.


Look at all those options! Not all will be in a given game however.


3. Multiplayer Solitaire / Player Interaction / (Competitive / Casual)

I think Dominion really hit this one on the head. How much player interaction is there? As much as you want there to be. Remember those 25 different action cards? Some let you be really nasty to the other players. Others just let you play your own little game in lala land. You can just choose which ones to add.

An example is the weak attack card included in the base 10 action cards (those suggested for a beginner's game). This "Militia" makes all the other players discard down to 3 cards before they start their turn. Very annoying let me tell you. Of course there's a defense card, called the "Moat", that fends off attacks just by being in your hand (You don't even need to play it, although it does have an alternative action benefit so that it's not just taking up room.)

Now, you may never get to a Risk level of combat, but some of the nastier cards definitely add an edge to the game.


4. Skill / Luck / (Competitive / Casual)

And here's one place where my lack of experience may bite me in the ass. I would lean towards this being a very skill heavy game. I realize you have constant random card draw, but I think that it is completely eclipsed by good card purchasing. An experienced player will be building a well oiled machine. A newbie is going to be building a jumbled pile of mess.

Now, there is still fun in there for the Newbie. You are building *YOUR* deck, and there's always something fun about building something of your own. Additionally, the newbie is not going to be lost on the play mechanics in the first game. It is much easier to understand *how* to play Dominion than RftG for example. I don't know which game is easier to play well, but Dominion is definitely easier to understand the rules.


5. Runaway Leader / Effective Elimination / Catch-Up Mechanics / Score Obfuscation

And here is probably the greatest gimmick in the game. How do you win? Have the most victory points in your deck. What do victory points do for you when you draw them? Absolutely nothing. So who ever is leading in score probably has the most clogged deck. It's an automatic catch-up mechanic built right into the game. How groovey is that.

Can you tell if you're not going to win? Maybe. If someone has a deck that just purrs while you're constantly wasting card draws, you are not going to win. If two people are even remotely similar in purchasing power, then it's really hard to tell who's leading. It's true you can count what VP they add to their deck, but are we all human calculators? You also have to watch for them trashing some weak VP cards out during the beginning. (Yes, some actions let you actually trim down your deck, all you MtG minimalists rejoice.)


6. Fiddliness / Elegance (Rules & Bits)

Well, there aren't any fiddly rules. The whole concept of the game is the definition of Elegance. Simple rules, quick game play, with surprisingly deep implications. There really aren't any "gotchas" and even though the rules have details for the action cards, I haven't felt the need to look up a single one. They all make perfect sense to me.

The bits are simple. There's just 500 cards. The absence of cubes and money does not make this a game with elegant game bits however. They actually screwed up a few items in my opinion:

A. Due to the design, you have to shuffle *constantly*. Many people are going to bemoan the shuffling and stick to BSW. For those who don't, sleeves are almost a must. I mean, there are some cards that are in every game, and some that aren't, so they are not going to wear equally. And they used the "german" sized cards, so neither MtG or Yugio sleeves fit them. Maybe some OLGS will import the needed sizes from Korea for a reasonable price. For now I'm using MtG with an overhang.

B. This is 500 cards we're talking about. Not only that, but you need to keep them grouped into sets of 10. Not an easy task. The novel insert goes a long way, but not far enough for me. I think I'm going to pick up some recipe boxes and use index cards to keep them separated. (Contrast this with race, where you just take out the start worlds, then shuffle up and play away.)

C. There are some "place holder cards". I understand what they were trying to do. But they just don't do it. For one, the only thing different about them is a subtle color change on the back. I mean, you can notice it, but it doesn't scream "don't shuffle me in!" Heck, I spent a good long while just trying to find them all. They really needed to be completely different backed. Their main purpose is to shuffle them up and choose 10 action cards at random. They work okay for that. They are also supposed to be "place holders" to show when a pile runs out. Since they look *just* like the other cards, they don't do such a good job there. I need to get some different sleeves for them so this doesn't happen.


The BSW interface for those interested in the "no-shuffle" variant.


7. Theme / Enjoyment

Right. About the theme. What theme? I mean, some of the action cards are appropriately named, but I never feel like I'm building a "dominion". I'm building a deck gosh darn it. If you're looking for a theme, don't come here.

(Edit: Many of the replies keep pointing out that the card names are at least good reminders of what they do. A "Witch" curses your deck. A "Mine" upgrades your money. A "Moat" protects you from attacks. I will admit some of the cards have thematic effects to match their names. It does help a lot with remembering what they do and does add some theme.)

However, building that deck is very enjoyable. Partly it's buying goodies and then drawing them and getting to use them. It's also finding just the right combo of cards to lay down the sweet combo. It's when you start having great hand after great hand.

And when you mess up and make a jumbled mess? Just sort out the cards and start again.

I think this game appeals to the consumer in all of us. It's like someone giving you a $100 gift certificate to your favorite game store. You purchase the games you want, and then you get to play with them!


8. Tactical / Strategic / (Short Term / Long Term Planning)

Well, the wargamers are going to step in and tell me there is no long term planning in a 30 minute game. For what it's worth, the card you buy on your first turn is still likely to influence your last turn. That seems long term enough for me. So pretty much every purchase is a strategic decision.

The action card play is pretty much all tactical. You just need to figure out how you can best play out the hand you drew. After a few hands, you're going to get this down. There are times when you may have to choose between a couple nice action cards, but it's not really going to have long term consequences.

So over all, I think there's a nice bit of tactics and strategy.


9. Story Line / Multiple Paths to Victory

For just a card game, there is a real story line to this game. You really do start out with a piss poor estate with only some $1 cards. Over time you will build up to a thriving metroplis full of bustling people and happening action cards. (I really tried for theme there, but it felt forced even to me.)

Your deck definitely will have a different nature to it between the beginning and the end of the game. At the beginning you can barely afford anything. By the end you'll be slapping down amazing combos and purchasing gobs of VP at a time. Additionally, your deck will have a different flavor than your opponents' decks too. That is a hallmark of a good game to me. You all have the same goal (get VP cards), but you will all have different decks and different methods.

Some decks will be large and full of surprises. Others will be lean and mean. Some magic players might pipe up with "Isn't lean and mean always better?" And I'd reply "sure, until you try to absorb VP cards without screwing up your engine, good luck with that".


10. Approachability / Player Ranges

The very simple rules keep Dominion a very approachable game. I can teach it in all of about 2 minutes at most. Gererally it's easiest to teach by just playing a solo game for a few turns so they can see how the mechanics work. I haven't found anyone intimidated by the rules.

The wide assortment of action cards available can throw people for a loop at first, but most people are comfortable just buying something and seeing how it works for the first few games. Steer clear of those people who have to try to absorb all the cards available before making any decision. Just tell them you promise to play a second game right after this one (and a third...).

The box lists for 2-4 players. I haven't tried the full 4, but I'm sure I will soon. Some of the attack cards become different levels of powerful with different number of players, but that's about it. You add a few more VP cards to be available with 3-4 players. So overall, I'd say it scales pretty well and feels pretty similar.


By the time you finish this review, Jay will already have these players up and going.


42. Conclusion

For me, Dominion delivered on the hype. You really do need to take a moment and make sure it appeals to you. I would ask two main questions:

Can you handle a mostly abstract card game?
Do you get pleasure from building games?

If so, then you should really give this gem a shot. It meets all my personal criteria:

A. It plays quickly with little downtime. (Except for shuffling.)
B. It's full of meaningful decisions. (Every time I buy a card.)
C. It's fun! (This deck is *my* baby dammit!)

So hopefully this review will shed some more light on the hype of the moment. As I said at the beginning, the low price point, easy rules and short play time mean that many of you out there will definitely be trying this in the near future.

  • [+] Dice rolls
AxonDomini
United States
Smithtown
New York
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Excellent review, and I mostly agree with it. Just a few points I'd like to address:

Quote:
Then on your turn:

You always start with a clean plate.
Then you draw five cards.
Then you play *one* action card.
Then you spend any money you drew and buy *one* new card.
Then you put *everything you touched* into your discard pile. (Yes everything, you don't have any "permanents" or other nonsense.)


A minor nit-pick, but you draw your 5 new cards at the end of your turn, not the beginning. This is fairly important as it affects the utility of the attack cards.

Quote:
Right. About the theme. What theme? I mean, some of the action cards are appropriately named, but I never feel like I'm building a "dominion". I'm building a deck gosh darn it. If you're looking for a theme, don't come here.


I actually find the theme of Dominion to be about as well integrated as any card game I can think of. It's not on part with, say, Twilight Struggle, but what card game is? The idea of using money to build your infrastructure to generate more money to buy land seems pretty well integrated - again, for a card game.

Other than those two things, I think you really hit the nail on the head here. I find Dominion to be a VERY skill oriented game with a very small luck factor. Surprisingly so for a card game. It's a solid '10' in my book. I can't get enough of it.

3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tim Seitz
United States
Glen Allen
VA
flag msg tools
badge
Like water spilled on the ground, which cannot be recovered, so we must die. But God does not take away life; instead, he devises ways so that a banished person may not remain estranged from him. 2 Sam 14:14
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Quote:
Well, the wargamers are going to step in and tell me there is no long term planning in a 30 minute game.

30 minutes?! Whoa. Our games have all run 5-10.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
James Hemsley
Italy
Desio
MB
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
So does it have legs? Will you get tired of it? Is it good for multiple plays?

--James
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jesse Dean
United States
Chicago
IL
flag msg tools
badge
Pound for pound, the amoeba is the most vicious predator on Earth!
Avatar
mbmbmb
I have had games last a bit longer than 10 minutes, but there were 4 player games with new players.

Generally 2 player games last 10-15 minutes, and 3-4 player games last around 30 minutes, but there are always exceptions.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jennifer Schlickbernd
United States
Santa Clarita
California
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I've played 91 games in less than a week, so it certainly has legs for me! It's great for multiple plays because the cards combine in so many different ways, meaning that if you use the random set up, you almost certainly will not see the same set of cards in the same session.

From what I've seen, the biggest predictors of how long the game will go is if the Village is in play, and then if the players haven't played a lot before. What I'm seeing is beginning players buying a lot of Villages, playing 10+ cards in a turn (where BSW actually is slower than RL) and then buying a 5 point card. This slows down the game tremendously. After people have a decent number of games under their belt, they begin to see that long chains of cards aren't necessarily much better than a Gold and a couple of coppers and don't do this as much. Then two player games can be over in less than 10 minutes.

I'm going to also write a review, but while I have played the game a ton, I haven't played it FTF, and since that's the way it was designed and playtested, I want to get some FTF games in before I do my review.
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Peter T Davies
United Kingdom
Crewe
Cheshire
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
doubtofbuddha wrote:
I have had games last a bit longer than 10 minutes, but there were 4 player games with new players.

Generally 2 player games last 10-15 minutes, and 3-4 player games last around 30 minutes, but there are always exceptions.


Is this typical?! I only got the game yesterday, and played a single game with my wife last night, but it took us over an hour. Admittedly, we were choosing quite a wide assortment of cards in order to see how they actually worked. We didn't end up with any of the action piles depleted, and the game ended when the Provinces deck was exhausted. I think the final score was about 70-30, and I'm guessing this isn't typical!
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Peter T Davies
United Kingdom
Crewe
Cheshire
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Ah! I've just been reading another thread, and I've just realised that the game ends when ANY three SUPPLY decks are exhausted - not three Action card decks. Certainly the Copper and Estate decks were exhausted, and I suspect the Duchy pile was finished, if I recall correctly.

Oh well, here's hoping this saves someone else from making the same mistake
12 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sheamus Parkes
United States
Carmel
Indiana
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
out4blood wrote:
Quote:
Well, the wargamers are going to step in and tell me there is no long term planning in a 30 minute game.

30 minutes?! Whoa. Our games have all run 5-10.


I haven't played it in enough situations to know the real play time. So I'm sticking with the box as listed. As you can see from other comments, there are definitely a variety of play times. For conservatism, I'd stick with "well under an hour".
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sheamus Parkes
United States
Carmel
Indiana
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Iceberg1 wrote:
So does it have legs? Will you get tired of it? Is it good for multiple plays?

--James


Heck if I know yet. As I admitted towards the beginning, I'm not at the "experienced" stage, so I don't know it's legs. It just appears to be good for multiple plays. It definitely screams for multiple plays in one sitting.

Other players seem to be answering "yes".
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sheamus Parkes
United States
Carmel
Indiana
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
jschlickbernd wrote:
From what I've seen, the biggest predictors of how long the game will go is if the Village is in play, and then if the players haven't played a lot before. What I'm seeing is beginning players buying a lot of Villages, playing 10+ cards in a turn (where BSW actually is slower than RL) and then buying a 5 point card. This slows down the game tremendously. After people have a decent number of games under their belt, they begin to see that long chains of cards aren't necessarily much better than a Gold and a couple of coppers and don't do this as much. Then two player games can be over in less than 10 minutes.


Great truth there! I thought "look! Cantrips". It took me a few times to go "wait, I'm cantripping into crap, why not just buy good stuff".
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sheamus Parkes
United States
Carmel
Indiana
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
ptd99uk wrote:
Ah! I've just been reading another thread, and I've just realised that the game ends when ANY three SUPPLY decks are exhausted - not three Action card decks. Certainly the Copper and Estate decks were exhausted, and I suspect the Duchy pile was finished, if I recall correctly.

Oh well, here's hoping this saves someone else from making the same mistake


And yes, as noted, I skimped on some of the finer rules details. I tend to only try and hit the big ones.

You do draw at the end of your turn so other attack cards can hit you. The game ends when any three stacks are exhausted. It also ends when the big VP cards are gone.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dave Eisen
United States
Redwood City
California
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb
I would suggest you edit your initial post to correct the minor errors in the rules. It's a very strong review and I would like a lot of people to read it, people who will likely not read this entire thread.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sheamus Parkes
United States
Carmel
Indiana
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
dkeisen wrote:
I would suggest you edit your initial post to correct the minor errors in the rules. It's a very strong review and I would like a lot of people to read it, people who will likely not read this entire thread.


Thanks for the compliment Dave.

I can try to switch around the card drawing bit. Was there anything else I got wrong? I tried to edit out the remnants of strategy suggestions I had originally let slip through. I usually try not to do the full rules, and usually I take it as a challenge to distill complicated games down to a single paragraph of rules. I went a little detailed here since the entire rules are pretty simple.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Greg Payne
United Kingdom
Bristol
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmb
Isamoor wrote:
cantripping into crap

I think I'm stealing that quote if I ever have to explain the game to any M:TG players I know...
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
John Richard
United States
Avon
US
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Fantastic review. My copy should arrive next week, and I'm quite excited about playing now.

One question, and forgive me if I missed it in the review: what triggers the end game? Depletion of a certain type of cards?

Thanks!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sheamus Parkes
United States
Carmel
Indiana
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
IndianaJohn wrote:
Fantastic review. My copy should arrive next week, and I'm quite excited about playing now.

One question, and forgive me if I missed it in the review: what triggers the end game? Depletion of a certain type of cards?

Thanks!


The game ends if:

Any 3 available cards are exhausted.
OR
The big VP card is exhausted.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Eric O. LEBIGOT
France
Versailles
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Isamoor wrote:

0. Description
Gimmicks:
1. Analysis Paralysis / Downtime
2. Frequency of Meaningful Decisions
3. Multiplayer Solitaire / Player Interaction / (Competitive / Casual)
4. Skill / Luck / (Competitive / Casual)
5. Runaway Leader / Effective Elimination / Catch-Up Mechanics / Score Obfuscation
6. Fiddliness / Elegance (Rules & Bits)
7. Theme / Enjoyment
8. Tactical / Strategic / (Short Term / Long Term Planning)
9. Story Line / Multiple Paths to Victory
10. Approachability / Player Ranges
42. Conclusion

I love the format of your review; I find the criteria you chose extremely relevant. Looking forward to reading more reviews from you!
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sheamus Parkes
United States
Carmel
Indiana
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
lebigot wrote:
I love the format of your review; I find the criteria you chose extremely relevant. Looking forward to reading more reviews from you!


Thanks for the compliment Eric! My categories have grown and changed over time. I'm pretty happy with the ones I have now. By the time I get done fleshing out all of these sections, I find I don't have much left to say about the game.

Now, I'm not sure how well they help other people, but they at least do a good job of organizing my thoughts.

Many of my older reviews use at least similar sections (RftG in particular.) And I will be sure to use them going forward.

Long reviews just take time unfortunately, and I don't have a ton of that. It's the day after a hard professional exam, so I decided just to take the time and do what I wanted
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Randolph Bookman
United States
Los Angeles
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Great review!!
I was curious how it compared to other deck building games like Fairy Tale etc. I know there is no drafting mechanic.

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Toussaint
Germany
Karlsruhe
flag msg tools
Isamoor wrote:


5. Runaway Leader / Effective Elimination / Catch-Up Mechanics / Score Obfuscation

And here is probably the greatest gimmick in the game. How do you win? Have the most victory points in your deck. What do victory points do for you when you draw them? Absolutely nothing. So who ever is leading in score probably has the most clogged deck. It's an automatic catch-up mechanic built right into the game. How groovey is that.


I don't quite agree. A player with mostly 6VP-Provinces has not a very clogged deck. Catching up to this player is almost impossible - the game ends with buying the last province. So if your card-machine starts 3 turns late, it's 3 turns too late.


Chris
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sheamus Parkes
United States
Carmel
Indiana
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
shieldwolf wrote:
Great review!!
I was curious how it compared to other deck building games like Fairy Tale etc. I know there is no drafting mechanic.


Hrm, compare to fairy tale, (that I like quite a bit by the way).

There's plenty of details, but I think this is the biggest difference:

In Fairy Tale, you can play a storybook and hope you meet the conditions later.

In Dominion, you can always get exactly what you want. It's figuring out what you want that is difficult.

(Now, it's true that you need to draw stuff in the right combinations for Dominion, but you are going to draw the cards you purchase. There's no speculation.)

Fairy Tale isn't as deep either, as in there aren't as many paths to victory. Most games are going to feel pretty similar, and you have to somewhat base your plans on what is handed to you (and what the people next to you are *not* doing.)

In Dominion, you see the options at the beginning and are free to blend them together how ever you want into a strategy. Nothing is restricting you or limiting your choices.


So that's just the biggest difference in feel for me. I still like Fairy Tale however.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
T. Rosen
United States
Arlington
Virginia
flag msg tools
admin
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Iceberg1 wrote:
So does it have legs? Will you get tired of it? Is it good for multiple plays?

--James


I've played 74 times in two weeks, so it's good for multiple plays for me
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Caleb
United States
Seminole
Florida
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Of what quality are the cards? Is sleeving all 500 of them really necessary? I hate card sleeves and would prefer to play without; would this work?

EDIT: also, is the theme stricly medieval, or is there a fantasy element like in Citadels?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loc Nguyen
United States
Alexandria
Virginia
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
i love this game although i only played it four times. There is multiple ways to win. I usually come in last, because everyone else would cantrip markets. Today I actually won with a score of 14 (4p game) by gold and market very early while everyone else was cantrip crap. (Sorry for repeating the phrase which everyoneelse will now use)
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2 , 3  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.