Randy Cox
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Clemson
South Carolina
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We played games with a couple down the street this weekend. It was great and we got to play two fun games (Hanging Gardens and Compatibility). But that's not the point.

We know these people primarily because we have kids of the same age. In fact, their son and our daughter are in the same kindergarden class.

Well, their son has recently been working on his numbers, particularly those between 10 and 20. His mother asked us what should be a simple question:

"What are some good games for him that will help him with number recognition, particularly between 10 and 20? And not including any arithmatic."

So my wife and I thought about it. Most games we thought of included some sort of addition or subtraction or simply didn't go over 10. Even just counting spaces would work, but only if you count up into the teens.

Oh, and there was one more caveat: "Not Chutes and Ladders."

The only thing we've come up with yet is Rack-o.
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Riva
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    Hisss gives you the opportunity to count up your cards after a relatively short playtime. Often the final score is in the teens.

    Amazing Flea Circus would fill the same niche as well.

             Sag.


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Brad Fuller
United States
Virginia Beach
Virginia
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If you play the Tactical Varient of Category 5, you use 10 cards per player. In a 2 player game you would use 1-20 etc. Maybe that could work. Plus it helps put the numbers in order.

No thanks might also be able to be modified.
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Billy McBoatface
United States
Lexington
Massachusetts
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Slide 5/6 nimmt/category 5. To play this you need to be able to look at two numbers (1..104), and decide which is bigger and which is smaller. I used this one with my daughter when she had trouble with double digit numbers.
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Marcelo Paschoalin
Brazil
Santo André
SP
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What about Formula Dé (or Formula D, or even Formula Dé Mini)? If you use the simpler rules from Formula Dé Mini I think the problem with numbers will be adressed without trouble.
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Jae
United States
Bryan
TX
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Formula De or Lost Cities (without handshakes) would work quite well.
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Sue Hemberger

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Dist of Columbia
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Number Chase goes from 1 to 50 and doesn't involve arithmetic. You do have to know odds vs. evens, ranges, greater than and less than, single vs. double digit. And someone playing the game has to be able to read. It seems designed for exactly this age/issue.


I didn't think it was much of a game (guess the number I'm thinking of), but kids at school (up through 3rd or 4th grade) seemed to get a kick out of it when we brought it in and played it in the lobby. Each game had more players than the one before.






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Big Kat
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Oregon
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fermmoylle wrote:
What about Formula Dé (or Formula D, or even Formula Dé Mini)? If you use the simpler rules from Formula Dé Mini I think the problem with numbers will be adressed without trouble.


When my younger son was learning his teens, we played a lot of Formula De Mini. The purple die (11-20) gave him a lot of reps.
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Rebekah B
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Colorado
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Unnamed Object has cards up to 17, although it skips a few.

If he's just learning to recognize numbers, the full game of Category 5 would probably be too difficult, but I used the cards from my version in a game like War to teach my son to recognize numbers and understand place value. I used cards 1-99, but if she only wants to concentrate on 1-20, she should only use those cards. Each player has a stack and flips the top card over. We used math manipulatives to model the tens and ones for each number to develop good number sense (popsicle sticks in groups of tens and ones make good manipulatives). The player with the higher number captures both cards, and wins the flags on them. The first player to 20 points wins the game, so it doesn't last very long. While it's not high on the fun factor (for the parents, at least; my son enjoyed it!), it was very effective in quickly teaching number recognition, place value, and ranking, as well as counting up the score.
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Jonathan Dietrich
Canada
Waterloo
Ontario
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No Thanks! works (numbers 3-35) though may be a bit advanced for them to play well.
 
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