Recommend
 
 Thumb up
 Hide
7 Posts

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Gaming Related » General Gaming

Subject: USDA: Lacey Act applies to imported paper products rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Brian Dysart
United States
San Jose
California
flag msg tools
Found this at http://www.gamingreport.com/article.php?sid=26005&mode=threa...:

Quote:
Joyce Greenholdt Reports: Games manufacturers and comics publishers who print books and other paper products outside the U.S. will soon have to fill out an import declaration specifying which species of trees or plants was used in making the paper components, according to a news update from the Game Manufacturers Association (GAMA). In the update, GAMA Public Relations Coordinator John Kaufeld said, "According to the latest information that we received from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the new expansions to the Lacey Act DO cover paper products used in our books and games."

...

The requirement to provide a declaration does not go into effect until Dec. 15, 2008. Enforcement is to be phased in and is anticipated to begin in Spring 2009. Failure to provide the declaration once enforcement begins may result in delayed or refused shipments by Customs, and/or fines.


Given the number of games printed in China these days, this seems like it'll affect quite a few game companies. Has anyone had any experience with this act?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Daniel Corban
Canada
Newmarket
Ontario
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Look for the USDA CERTIFIED stamp on your next Fantasy Flight game.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Justin Fitzgerald
United States
Mazomanie
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
dcorban wrote:
Look for the USDA CERTIFIED stamp on your next Fantasy Flight game.


This isn't a good sign. We'll soon see class divisions in the type of games consumed. Like me, I'll only consume Grade A because I've got the money whereas you poor gamers will have to have Grade B or maybe even games made from unknown parts of ground up variant Monopolys.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
KakarisMaelstrom wrote:
dcorban wrote:
Look for the USDA CERTIFIED stamp on your next Fantasy Flight game.


This isn't a good sign. We'll soon see class divisions in the type of games consumed. Like me, I'll only consume Grade A because I've got the money whereas you poor gamers will have to have Grade B or maybe even games made from unknown parts of ground up variant Monopolys.


I will also expect USDA to indicate whether or not I will get mad cow disease from eating game components.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Hiding Tiger
Australia
Parmelia
Western Australia
flag msg tools
Grrrrrrrrowf!
badge
Grrrrr aaarrrggghhh
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I thought you were talking about restricting imports of Paper Lace.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
J.L. Robert
United States
Sherman Oaks
California
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Follow me for wargames!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I'm so glad that the USDA is now overseeing the nation's publications. shake

Does that mean game companies are now eligible for farming subsidies?

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ray Creveling
United States
Marietta
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
All USDA joke aside, this is pretty normal for products printed in the US. Customers specify things like Recycled content, FSC Certification, Ink types(Soy) all the time. When I buy foreign paper I'm told how and where it's produced as well as what plants it comes from (Many S. American sheets are Cellulose). I think making foreign printers provide the same information to consumers that are demanded of me is fair.

I am making the assumption that any voluntary attempts to get accurate reporting on this in the past has failed. I am not a big fan of regulation.

Printing here in the US is very regulated environmentally and penalized from an insurance standpoint. Even clean printers who use silver free plates, soy based inks new short setup presses and clean digital production for short runs are often seen as dirty manufacturing. This in part with the digital revolution has made Printing and Lithography a very capital intensive business. A friend of mine just put in a new 6 Color 24"X29" Kamori for 1.3 million US. That replaces a 10 year old 23x29 5 color. He expects to have to replace it in another 8-10 to keep up with the competition. Prepress systems are in a constant state of upgrade as is bindery. So a little assistance from the feds to level the playing field appreciated.

All that being said, and sorry for the rant, Printing and assembly of board games is very labor intensive. I understand as a consumer and printed why it was offshored. I used to print and assemble bingo games for a customer. We would print between 150 and 250 of 3 games at a time and it was insane. The printig costs were high, the bindery costs, Lamination, cutting, collating, etc were excessive but the assembly was nuts. I payed 4 people to put together 150 games over 2 hours and that was after component sets such as cards and bingo chips were put together. By the third time the job came in and we rang every operational efficiency we could out of the job we were just barely breaking even. So my hat is off to people who can produce these games and make a profit.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.