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Subject: Non-Gamers Gone Wild!! How to host big college game parties. rss

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Sight Reader
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This thread describes how I run large scale open-invitation game parties with complete non-gamers. The main challenge here is managing a party with a large population of party animals who are not yet convinced that game parties can be fun and arrive in late, random groups. For discussions about the related social issues, consult the following:

http://boardgamegeek.com/article/1929870#1929870

Phase 0: Invitations

Attendance depends heavily on what else is going on that same night: keep alert for news of competing events! I do not even schedule a game party unless I have at least two people I can absolutely trust to show up - even if a rock star is visiting next door. This gives you at least something to do if everyone else stiffs you.

Once my core of "reliables" are confirmed, I use a social networking thing like Facebook for the mass invitations. My standard caveats run something like this:

"Party starts at 6. Arrive before 7 if you want in on the pizza. As a favor, if you are gonna be more than a few hours late call in advance so you don't get locked out of the fun!"

The food cutoff time is a gentle way of applying the pressure, at least until you get experience with unpredictability.

Phase 1: Appetizer

Here are some games I've found work well as "appetizers":
- Set
- Ricochet Robot
- "Speed" Quiddler (see http://boardgamegeek.com/thread/254300 )
- Pit
- Jungle Smarts

2-4 Players Only:
- Pecking Order
- Raj
- Hey, That's My Fish
- Fish Eat Fish
- Rumis
- Villa Paletti
- Jenga

The purpose of this phase is to reward those who actually show up on time. When the first guy shows up, you get him started on food and drinks, maybe some small talk or TV, and, if he's up for it, an "appetizer" game.

What you want in an "appetizer" is something that's fast, very easy to learn, light, easy to set up and tear down and easy to abandon without feeling you missed something. Think of these as "demonstration" games or even as "advertisements" - as people come in, these games provoke curiosity and many can figure them out simply by watching.

Most of these games are played in rounds, making it easy to abandon them. Puzzle solvers like Set, Jungle Smarts, Ricochet Robot and Speed Quiddler even allow players to jump in right away while a neighbor whispers the rules of play.

Phase 2: Salad

- Loot
- Slide 5 (aka Category 5/Take 6)
- Incan Gold
- Bluff
- Apples to Apples
- Any of the previously mentioned "appetizers"

When you feel the population is more stable (usually around the time I know how much pizza to order), then it's safe to take out a game that's a little more substantial but still quick to play. The big difference here is that teams are a little more set, strategy is more involved, and setup and tear down may be a bit more involved.

A very important trick you can use to handle surprise arrivals is to play games that accomodate either "non-player roles" or team play (the game Loot comes to mind as particularly good with this).

Group play really helps non-gamers get sold on the concept that strategy might actually being a fun way to spend an evening. A full discussion of this concept is in the following thread:

http://boardgamegeek.com/article/2475057#2475057

Usually we eat pizza after this phase. When this happens, my place becomes a real mess. I am busy as a hen trying to get the food and plates to everyone and don't have time to clean up the last game played, so instead we migrate to another room, usually one with plenty of diversions: a TV with eye candy, good dance music, munchies, stupid Rubik's Cube puzzles, joke books, stuffed animals... whatever. This is also a time (usually 2-3 hours after the party started) that the major mass of people arrive. Like locusts, we've destroyed one room and moved to another.

Phase 3: Entree

- Why Did the Chicken...
- Werewolf (the downloadable "megaset": http://boardgamegeek.com/file/info/35798 )
- Classic party/drinking games (Trivial Pursuit, Balderdash, etc)

As people finish eating and big parties of late arrivers parade in, it's time to launch The Big One. Games with this many people have considerable down time, so the little diversions you filled your room with are critical to keeping people occupied and in your party once they've either been eliminated or the moderator has to make everyone wait because he's confused (at such points, I usually yell, "DANCE BREAK!" and crank the music while I fumble through rules)

Remember that there will still be people coming and going. Once again, games with a "round" structure are good for handling this. Another possibility is to start additional games in other rooms. If you do this, though, beware that you now have multiple, independant parties. Those playing games without the presence of a host may feel uncomfortable and leave prematurely. To prevent this, I suggest removing yourself from any one game and taking on the role of full-time host, ensuring food and needs are taken care of, new arrivals are matched to good games, people get help with rules, and new games are given to groups that finish.

Phase 4: Dessert
 

Eventually, a big batch of people will leave all at once. Here you have to judge the energy of those remaining. Most of the time, the people left are exhausted. You can use a crazy, high energy "dessert" like Pit or Spoons as a farewell boost. Usually, though, it’s a great time to put in a movie so everyone can kick back in the glow of a day’s fun and pass out on the couch.

Occasionally, though, those that remain are intrigued by possibilities of gaming and are actually looking for something more challenging. This is an excellent opportunity to introduce a serious Eurogame - you no longer have to worry about random people arriving to disrupt the experience.

Be forewarned, though: you won’t be getting to sleep until 3am!
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Michael Matera
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Re: Open Invitation Game Nights with Non-Gamers... a How-To Guide!
Very nice outline of a game night.

I too and starting to consider offering a game night. I am just wondering if you think it is ok to have people come and then split into two or three groups to play different games?

Thanks.
 
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Re: Open Invitation Game Nights with Non-Gamers... a How-To Guide!
matera wrote:
Very nice outline of a game night.

I too and starting to consider offering a game night. I am just wondering if you think it is ok to have people come and then split into two or three groups to play different games?

Thanks.

That is a structure we are just starting to get experience with (see the Entree section).

If you have multiple games going, what I have learned is that it's wise to disengage yourself from playing and be the "all-seeing eye" that coordinates things, making sure players are happy with their groups and paired up in the right ways. Most importantly, you have to transition groups that finish so they don't have that, "Now what are we supposed to do?" feeling (unless they know you, they're not going to touch your stuff and grab another game).

Don't be afraid to use the "team" concept (see the Salad portion) to move players "prematurely" from one group to another. This reduces the need to have perfect timing in getting games to finish at the same time.
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Re: Open Invitation Game Nights with Non-Gamers... a How-To Guide!
Here's my response to the thread that prompted my post:

vxl119 wrote:
I've loved playing games all my life. Recently, I decided to make gaming an "official" hobby of mine. So, to go along with the hobby, I needed a regular game night. I figured a steady game night would be a good way to get some regular gaming in. Now, I'm having second thoughts.

I and my wife had our first game night recently. I was the only "gamer" at the party, but most of the guests indicated that they loved games. It was fun but chaotic. Here are some issues I noticed.

1. People showing up at random times.
Just when we got a couple games set up, explained them, and started playing, 2 more people showed up. What do you do with them?

This is the main thrust of my post. Since the answer is complex, I'll just refer back to the original post:

http://boardgamegeek.com/article/2939863#2939863

vxl119 wrote:

2. Lack of self-organization, leading to too much work for the hosts.It was hard to organize people into gaming groups, teach the rules, play, and take care of administrative party duties (hellos, goodbyes, drinks, etc.) It would have been much easier if we had a few eager guests running the games instead of us.

I have a lot of "snowball" games that I use as more and more folks arrive. Thus, we keep everyone in one game until pizza comes and it's time for the next phase.

vxl119 wrote:

3. Drinking, which led to a loss of interest in guests.Some people had a few drinks, and then either stopped paying attention, refused to play games altogether, or said they couldn't handle anything more complicated than UNO. I suspect part of the issue is that our game night was on Friday, so people felt free to "let themselves go."

The "appetizer" and "salad" games I described are designed to eliminate this problem. These games not only set a more intellectual mood, but also serve to advertise - remember, we have to sell the bizarre concept that games can be a fun alternative to the bottle, especially if people are skeptical of the "gamer" culture. Another vital function is to establish your credibility as a person whose can be trusted to give everyone a fun time: if people sense things are faltering, they'll take matters (and booze) into their own hands.

As your party snowballs, keep a close eye out for the level of engagement of newcomers. Do not force them to play if they don't want to... find ways to get them actively involved without being in a decision making capacity. Also don't hesitate to stop an appetizer and start a new one if you feel you might be losing their interest.
vxl119 wrote:

4. Need for short filler games.By the end of the night, quite a few people said: "I can't play a long game because I have to leave in 30 minutes to pick up the kids, wake up early, wash my hair, etc." Due to our modest game selection, we did not have many lucrative short games.

Yes, this is definitely a must. Obviously I'm biased, but I recommend getting a kitchen timer and playing my variant of Quiddler. Even with a regular deck of playing cards and a few chips you can play No, Thanks, which is a very flexible and fun game. The thing is, I try to stick to unfamiliar games to keep people open to experimentation, otherwise people will fiercely demand to play Trivial Pursuit when you try to bring out a Eurogame "entree".

vxl119 wrote:

Next Steps
Right now, we're not sure how to approach our next game night. Tentatively, we're thinking of having a smaller game night (5-10 people as opposed to 15-20). This will have the added advantage of screening out disruptive or non-cooperative guests. Another alternative is to NOT have a regular game night. Instead, we can rely on one-time get-togethers with other families. Any advice?

Hopefully, that won't be necessary: a large, willing group is an unbelievably valuable and VERY rare asset.

What I learned is a HUGE "no-no"... never scold guests. If people don't put games back quite the way you like it or lose trust in your "party" judgement, then never try to bark your way back in control! Try to maintain a mellow, relaxed atmosphere... this is exceptionally difficult for "engineer" type personalities (we are trained to value orderly discipline and control) but if everyone wants to put someone else in command, accept your defeat cheerfully and jump in.

You never know, you might still have a blast... just a little different from what you planned!
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John W
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sightreader wrote:
Like locusts, we've destroyed one room and moved to another.

Phase 3: Entree

GREAT line!

Deserves thumbs up just for that, but the rest of the wonderful walk-thru of one gamer's experience with hosting parties (especially the ever-dangerous non-gamer kind) deserves many more.

Is that who I think it is, behind those finger-shields?

Peek-a-boo! laugh
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Attendance for college students is unpredictable and sparse over winter break. Physical dexterity games, which tend to focus attention on "man vs nature" rather than "man vs man", are thus excellent tools for handling these small, unstable game parties.
 

These games do great as "appetizers" or "salads" for a game party. They finish quickly and instantly draw the interest of new arrivals into the party.

Hamsterrolle seems to play better with fewer players and works very well to keep early arrivers occupied. We didn't get into the real ins and outs of the strategy, but it was nevertheless a lot of fun.

Like most dexterity games, Hamsterrolle quickly runs into grey areas no matter how carefully they try to define the rules. Thus, I did not encourage particularly competitive play, and we improvised a lot of house rules.

Once enough party traffic arrived, it became too dangerous to play on Hamsterrolle a table and we had to move the game to the floor. Unfortunately, this made moves very uncomfortable to execute.

Bamboleo stands up much higher on the floor and is thus more practical when there's a lot of traffic. It is really more a parlor trick than a competition - figuring out who wins or loses just isn't as important as the intriguing discussions about what effects disturbing various pieces will have.

The dexterity required is only temporary, as your hand only needs to be steady for the critical seconds during which you remove a piece.

It is also very easy to improvise alternate rules: you can play it Jenga like, or - like we did - you can simply see how many items the group as a whole can remove before things collapse.

We also found we could make things quite a bit harder by having round pieces lying on their side. This generates unpredictability and livelier discussion, as you have to discuss how pieces might roll in addition to changes in table tilt.

The design of Villa Paletti is intrinsically competitive, meaning that any holes in the rules will cause problems that are harder to work around.

Of these games, Villa Paletti is physically the most demanding, requiring hands to be steady for long periods of time trying to access, remove, then replace pieces.

As a result, play falls apart unless players are evenly matched in dexterity.
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Simon Lundström
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Wait… invitations, appetizer, salad, entrée… and then dessert.

I take it there wasn't time for main dish?
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Andy Leighton
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Zimeon wrote:
Wait… invitations, appetizer, salad, entrée… and then dessert.

I take it there wasn't time for main dish?


It is a peculiar American usage. Entrée means main course over there.
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CHAPEL
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Where's the beer?
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MWChapel wrote:
Where's the beer?

Actually, not having any beer is one of the big attractions of these game parties. The games create situations conducive to a lot of goofy, crazy humor without all the alcohol and irresponsibility you get in your typical drunken house party.


This allows people let off a lot of exhuberance and steam without that vaguely guilty feeling that comes with getting drunk and spending way too much money. People are invited to drink, but they're generally too wrapped up in the games and silliness.


In particular, students who are underage or Christian get to participate in a lot of senseless idiocy without breaking laws or feeling stigmatized for refusing alcohol.

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andyl wrote:
It is a peculiar American usage. Entrée means main course over there.


Yes, he's absolutely right. Over here we think that by saying "entrée" we ignorant savages sound classier than we would if we said, "main dish".
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Dan Becker
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Dang, that party has got it going on! Thanks for the photos.
 
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sightreader wrote:


"*yawn* I'm sick of this kiddy crap, can we play Combat Commander instead?"
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hacksword wrote:

"*yawn* I'm sick of this kiddy crap, can we play Combat Commander instead?"

Hee... the short answer is that ya gotta start with "introductory" stuff to develop the "gaming tolerance" for deeper stuff.


It usually becomes apparent what sort of potential people have for more intensity just by watching how they approach even the silliest of games. Although some don't have the interest to move on, most quite readily climb the ladder of complexity:

Non-gamer: Not yet sold on the idea of spending an intellectual night playing games.
Casual gamer: Likes the idea of a sedentary night of games, but strategy guided mostly by instinct (flight or fight) rather than analysis
Full gamer: Consistently devises strategies based on a dispassionate analysis and exploitation of game mechanics

We start off with light, non-gamer stuff like Werewolf to see how patient people are for rules and whether they display an aptitude for tactical thinking.


When I feel someone is ready for something deeper, we move on to strategic but light Euros like Medici, Loot or Timbuktu to test their chops:




The next level is stuff that uses heavier mechanics but has a more approachable theme, like Last Night on Earth: The Zombie Game, Pacific Typhoon or 300: The Board Game:




Finally we play light wargames like Battle Cry and Wallenstein (first edition). Although I used to like bigger, longer wargames, these Euros are about all I have interest for these days: they just seem to be a lot more elegant, while the bigger ones just seem to add a lot of mechanics without really adding much intensity.


Up to now, I've been limiting these heavier sessions to "guys only", but I'm starting to hear interest from girls in such sessions as well. Since I'm in a "recruiting" phase now (I'm casting the net for more non-gamers), I haven't been scheduling heavier sessions lately.


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Sight Reader,

I'd like to get some more detail about the various game nights you host. What do you call them? It sounds like you've got:

Game Party
A night of light games. Any and all non-gamers are welcome.

Medium Game Night
For people who have shown some interest in games. These nights can have a theme, like Pirate Games or Train Games.

Heavy Game Night
For gamers who want to play heavy/complex games.

Also, how many game nights do you host a week? Do you attend any additional ones besides your own?

-Victor
 
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Howdy!
vxl119 wrote:

Game Party
A night of light games. Any and all non-gamers are welcome.

Yes, these are really the MASS parties... more like a Party Game Blowout.


The primary purpose here is to use games to fulfill many of the objectives of a standard house party. As a result, we rarely split up into multiple sub-games since people are as much interested in mixing as they are in games.

The "secret" objective here is to show that the intellectual challenge of games themselves can be an engaging way to spend an evening. I watch how people respond to these games to pick out candidates for more serious games.

The "main course" in these games is usually something everyone can play - a grandiose thing like Werewolf. However, as I mentioned earlier, we have all those "warm up" games in which we test drive riskier fare. If folks arrive late, they just team up until we're ready for the entree. If the early arrivers are unsure of what the party is about, I might do some of the flashy dexterity games to draw them in. If they accept the legitimacy of games as entertainment, though, then it's a great opportunity to try out some short, riskier fare that gives them a taste of a true Euro.


Another interesting opportunity arises if the party maxes out at a smaller number of players, or if there's a core of players with energy willing to stay late after the herd leaves. This opens up more intense games as the "main course", including things like Last Night on Earth: The Zombie Game or even Pacific Typhoon.

vxl119 wrote:

Medium Game Night
For people who have shown some interest in games. These nights can have a theme, like Pirate Games or Train Games.

Heavy Game Night
For gamers who want to play heavy/complex games.

Nights devoted entirely to these types of games actually require a different sort of invitation from the parties described above. Note that we actually play some of the quicker "Medium Games" (what I would call "Social Games") as part of the warmup in one of the Game Parties, but if were to preplan a night devoted to heavier fare, I would use a completely different sort of invitation.


These invitations are much more like what seasoned Gamers are used to. It's much more strict: a fixed number of pre-selected players arriving at a fixed time. I must take special pains to tell them that this is a very different sort of invitation from an open-ended blowout, meaning that I have to be relatively sure and secure in their committment to the concept of game nights.

I actually haven't done one of these in a while - I don't want anyone to feel left out of our little "exclusive" club. Maybe I might head out to the dance right now and set one up...
vxl119 wrote:

Also, how many game nights do you host a week? Do you attend any additional ones besides your own?

Well, we have weekly swing dances twice a week or so. As I dance with folks, I ask them if there are days or times that will work. I'd say about half the time something will work out, half the time it won't, so that gives us game parties roughly every week and a half.


That being said, it's very important not to hold them too often. Constant pining for more game parties might make you seem obsessive or needy. My guess is that people subconsciously become concerned that you may have an ulterior motive to your invitations which causes them to feel unsafe about coming. Even if people are enthusiastic about attending, keep an eye out for that "Sigh, here we go again" type reaction.

If attendance is going down or if I sense a loss of interest, I often hold off for a while to create a deliberate scarcity. You want to wait until people start scratching their heads wondering, "Hmmm... you're right... it has been a while since we've been to one of those..."


Lately, I've been surprised to get invitations to game parties others are throwing that are clearly modeled on the parties that I do. It's quite interesting to see the variations in these parties, and there are clearly more than the ones I've been invited to (often I hear about ones people have thrown in a student's home city). It's hard to say how prevalent these are - one girl told me that I've started a Werewolf craze on campus, but that's probably hyperbole.

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Benny Sperling
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How is quelf not on there? Ever nongamer I know loves quelf because it makes them all laugh! Otherwise, great job!
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benny275 wrote:
How is quelf not on there? Ever nongamer I know loves quelf because it makes them all laugh! Otherwise, great job!

Yes, I've been considering that one, but our game nights are already pretty wacky and my place is an accident waiting to happen with food and drink precariously balanced everywhere and my painfully bad back.


If we had a single large playing area, it wouldn't be a problem, but our space is divided awkwardly so there's not enough room for both elbows and legs to move around and a playing surface. We're either in the dining room, where one false move kicks the game table or knocks over bookshelves, or we're in the living room, where we can horse around but there's no room for a game table.


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I've been staring at a Werewolf variant based on The Thing for a while. We finally got to try it the other night.

With 7 and 8 players, it immediately became apparent that the original rules - testing two players a turn - was not only too complex, but favored humans heavily. Perhaps we misunderstood the rules or the game was designed for more players, but we instead went with much simpler rules:

0. One player is secretly chosen as The Thing.
1. Everyone then votes on who will be tested for infection by The Thing.
2. If the person tested is a Thing, he/she is killed and everyone get a bonus test - go back to step 1, test someone new, and keep at it until all Things are dead or someone tests negative.
3. If the person tested was human, bonus tests end and no one dies.
4. When testing is complete, everyone closes their eyes and The Thing secretly infects someone new to join its ranks.

This variant plays much faster than Werewolf. Eyes are closed for a short time, as the only night event is the choice of a new Thing. I'm sure this will change once we start creating special roles.


The game organically comes to an end if The Thing infects over half the population. At that point, there are enough Things to form a voting bloc that can override humans and ensure victory.

Of course, it's quite possible for humans to simply get lucky on their first guess and kill the Original Thing right away. With 7 and 8 players, this happened twice, which was a pretty accurate reflection of how many times we played the game.

Many of our players were experienced Werewolf players. The difference in strategy, however, made them easy prey for The Thing. In addition, people aren't often eliminated in this game (negative tests do not kill anyone). As a result, there wasn't a population of players who got to observe and learn Thing tactics from the grave.

Effective tactics were much more apparent to The Thing than they were to humans. The Thing noticed that Werewolf players tended to write off players who tested clean, so It simply made a habit of infecting players who were last tested.

Humans were also slow to understand was how quickly the voting bloc grows for Things. As a result, the natural tendency to vote with the consensus proved disastrous once the Thing controlled three players or so.

As a moderator (which may not be necessary, but I needed to observe stuff to make this report) I decided to even the odds by warning the Humans of Thing tactics I was seeing. This eventually led to more interesting games.


In our final game, the Original Thing, who had NO experience with Werewolf, successfully sensed where popular sentiment was heading and chose his recruits skillfully to avoid detection. Thus, he had infected 4 of the 8 players and had victory assured.

Original Thing realized that all the Things had to do was convince a single Human to test the wrong person, at which point The Thing voting bloc would be able to gang up on the faulty choice and win the game.

His schemes depended on a crack Werewolf player on the other side of the room recognizing this fact. Unfortunately, this player misunderstood his signals did not fully grasp this advantage - instead, he sought to sow confusion by using the old Werewolf tactic of turning on his own. The result of this excessively subtle betrayal was that the Original Thing was killed.

At this point, a talented Human (who also had never played Werewolf before) took over, recognizing who was in the "voting bloc" formed by the Original Thing. In quick succession (despite the feeble protests of the remaining Things), they eliminated two more Things.


However, Original Thing had chosen his allies wisely. His final ally was a girl so occupied with a toy that she wasn't really paying attention to the game at all. This made it very easy for her to continue acting innocent by obsessing over the toy while the remaining 3 turned on each other.

Unfortunately, the last surviving Thing could not maintain her indifference with only 4 players. The Thing she infected was eliminated, and the remaining two killed her, resulting in a spectacular turnaround victory for Humanity!
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Our group is now trying a Werewolf variant based on The Thing, using special roles based a BGG post.

It all actually worked quite well. We tried both the vanilla version and our modified version and found that the special roles slowed down the spread of The Thing enough to make even a six player game play pretty well, and the variety created by the roles resulted in much more interesting discussion.


Here are the roles we used:

Quote:
Bodyguard: choose one person to protect from Thing attack each night

Pharmacist: survive one attack from The Thing, but not a second

Pathologist: dies if tested, but immediately chooses next person to test

Cook: dies if attacked by The Thing, but may choose someone to poison (and kill) immediately after

Friendless: Choose someone at night. Their vote must agree with that person the next day.

Sapper: dies if attacked by The Thing, but Things must select one of their own to die as well.

Supply Chief: once per game, may resume testing after a negative result

Jailor: each night, choose a player to "silence". They may not speak nor vote, but may still be tested.

Demagogue: Once per game, play to have your vote count double.

Note: Only Things are aware if an attempted infection attack fails. All powers are lost if the holder is infected by The Thing


I learned some critical lessons in this trial run:

The current set of roles are a little too loaded against The Thing (at least if there are only six players). I may have to add some Thing friendly roles (assuming that can be done without causing players to beg to be infected or tested)

With only six players, it was way too common to kill The Thing on the first day (especially in absence of good poker faces). To remedy this, I think I'll add a Sleeper Agent role, which is a human who will become The Thing if all other Things die. This provides a backup for the instant kill case that keeps the game going and gives The Thing a sympathetic human on the first day.


It is far more important to have CLEAR role names than it is to have thematic ones. Failure to do so results in some serious moderator confusion - even from the guy who invented the roles! Thus, a name like Suicide Bomber (someone who takes a Thing with them if attacked) is much easier to play, even if it makes no sense to have a Suicide Bomber lurking about in a tiny Antarctic research station.

For clarity, we had all roles lose their special function if the owner gets turned into The Thing. Having simple rules that affect everyone the same way is much easier than having tons of exceptions that you have to explain to everyone (but the card owner, of course).
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Well, unfortunately, I haven't been able to host these parties very much lately, as I've run into an interesting problem: our swing dance group may be dividing into factions! Basically, when one person comes, it creates an awkward situation for another.

These tensions result in a lot of hesitation and uncertainty, as people have to discreetly check to see if their "enemy" is going to come, which in turn means it's just too risky for them to commit. This starts a cascade effect, as these folks are very popular and are a big reason others show up. We find the very strategy I've relied upon - drawing others by cultivating relationships with key "party animals" - now turned against me (I find myself picturing an evil screwage meister across the table cackling with glee!)

Obviously, I hadn't anticipated this problem with the "open invitation" format. You want to be inclusive, but what if there are some folks who are "poison" to others? Things can get vindictive and ugly in a hurry if you start conspicuously leaving people out of supposedly "open" invitations.

That being said, there are far more mundane reasons for our recent slowdown:

I've moved to a new, much earlier schedule. The prospect of having to wake up early (especially with my back problems) has done much to dissuade me from late weeknight parties.

I've got a new roommate who's a video game addict. As a result, we've been wasting every spare moment playing Ghost Recon and the like. On the positive side, I think I can get him into C&C: Ancients...

People have, quite simply, been too busy. I have about six "reliables" who are the core to any party (that is, when they say they'll come, they come), and if I can't get two of them to show, it's far too likely for attendance to come up totally empty to be worth the effort.

I'll keep ya guys posted as we work (or fail to work) through these problems!
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Hey, thanks for this thread - it's absolutely great!!

It's a particularly fascinating/enlightening read for me since I'm planning on starting a gaming society at my university next term and it's starting to dawn on me how difficult it will be to get started.

Any tips are very appreciated
 
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sightreader wrote:
I'd be very interested in knowing if this information is enough to get you started.


Well I won't know until I try, but I'll surely be posting a thread on here as soon as the ball starts rolling!!

In the meantime it's a fascinating read; even if I don't have the time to put it into practice just yet.
 
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RentonT wrote:
I know a good deal of people there and if everything works out I'll be dorming in a 3-person suite, which is a decent sized room for a dorm.

Dorms are an absolutely ideal place to start these game parties! At the early stages, you may want to start in more private dorm rooms until your group grows to become representative of non-gamers. This makes your group more inviting to non-gamer passers-by as you move out to playing in the Commons.


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MurrayL wrote:
In the meantime it's a fascinating read; even if I don't have the time to put it into practice just yet.
Why thank you!

Once again, there really wasn't much planning at first; it was all just stuff I was randomly messing with. Only as things got bigger and bigger did my objectives evolve.
 
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