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Subject: Radio Silence Variant rss

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itai raccah
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We recently came up with this variant and I think it is a very good variant. We already played it and it is a blast.

Rules:
1. Players may not communicate in any way their intentions and thoughts.
This means that the only way to signal players is through your actions. If you need a card in a player's hand, stand on that city and hope he gets it.
2. Play with your hands revealed. Try not to touch them too often as that may signal your intentions.
3. Any player may play a special event card from any player's hand during his turn.

That's it.
This makes every player count in the game, and you no longer have the bossy player syndrome. The game is also more difficult so I will try this with 4-5 epidemics first.
I like how this brings out the roles. Every player will do what his role does best, since he can't make too elaborate of a plan with other players.
And last, the game runs far more smoothly and you never get to a situation where everyone is trying to find the optimal move and are unable to agree.

Enjoy!
And please tell me if you try it.
 
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B C Z
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Playing wtih open hands is no different than everyone telling everyone else exactly what is in their hand.

Giving communal control of the action cards to everyone diminishes the role the person who drew it plays.

I fear this would reduce the game to a puzzle to be communally solved - in silence.

And enforced silence in a game is never fun.
 
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Matthew Scott
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byronczimmer wrote:
Playing wtih open hands is no different than everyone telling everyone else exactly what is in their hand.

Giving communal control of the action cards to everyone diminishes the role the person who drew it plays.

I fear this would reduce the game to a puzzle to be communally solved - in silence.

And enforced silence in a game is never fun.


1. I'm sure there are folks who can remember every card read to them as hands change and the game progresses, but even seasoned card players find that difficult. There is a significant difference.

2. We've played many games over the last few days, and with full communication it really didn't matter who drew the special cards. Their "role" in that case was simply to constantly remind us that they held a special card and ask if they should use it.

3. Co-op games, in my opinion, are communal puzzles (generally speaking). No "reduction" necessary. Randomness and tough choices make the puzzle replayable and more "game-like". Limitations on player interaction can too.

4. ...for you. Which is fine. We've found enforced restrictions on interaction (like silence) to be tremendously fun when implemented correctly (though it can be pretty awful too). I'm not usually a fan of variants, but simple changes like this one seem pretty cool. As I've said, we've played dozens of games of Pandemic this week, so we'll be looking to try this soon.
 
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Peter Johnston
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I tried something similar recently, enforcing that players could not speak unless it was their turn or in response to a question from the active player... and we hated it (and lost terribly). It may have more luck with a more experienced group who's getting board by winning all the time.
 
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itai raccah
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I never said we don't speak (Although one of the players did indeed stop speaking) We simply did not communicate anything about out plans and thoughts about the game.
We talked, not a lot though, and remarks like "good job" after a player has intuitively cleared a 3 from a city and it was drawn next turn were still there.
The idea is that instead of everyone talking together to make a collaborated effort to solve the game, we enforce the individual's role in decision making.
You make a decision, and the others need to make the best of it.

BTW, We have long ago abandoned the rule of holding the cards int he hand. That rule is meant to keep everyone involved by making them remind everyone about the cards they held. But we soon became more fluid and we often play a different number of pawns than the players present, and it has been great.
 
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for the topic, I would say it may be better to keep hands closed. That FULLY enforces radio silence. Sure, it makes the harder and perhaps more cumbersome, but it does give it more challenge, which si what some are after

byronczimmer wrote:
Playing wtih open hands is no different than everyone telling everyone else exactly what is in their hand.

Giving communal control of the action cards to everyone diminishes the role the person who drew it plays.

I fear this would reduce the game to a puzzle to be communally solved - in silence.

And enforced silence in a game is never fun.
There was a thread about this, but can't find it now. The jist of it was if you have open hands, one alpha player basically can take over the whole game. Otherwise, the alpha player, while still "barking orders", has his role lessened since he needs to rely on communicatiosn with other players.

As for "enforced silence", some games do have a "no table talk" rule.
 
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itai raccah
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It is impossible to have radio silence with a closed hand. You will never be able to use share knowledge.
 
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Poet wrote:
It is impossible to have radio silence with a closed hand. You will never be able to use share knowledge.
Haven't thought about that. I guess that could be the exception then.
 
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Lee Valentine
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This variant will just gut the powers of the researcher. Standing on a particular city for that particular city's card is 110% contrary to the powers of the researcher who can pass any of his cards on any city.

The game is hard enough in certain modes of play that I see no reason to gratuitously make it more difficult. And I see no reason to gut a character role that already has limited utility in certain modes of play.
 
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Lee Kennedy
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hudarklord wrote:
This variant will just gut the powers of the researcher. Standing on a particular city for that particular city's card is 110% contrary to the powers of the researcher who can pass any of his cards on any city.

I don't think this is true. The researcher still has to be in the same city as you to trade cards. So you move to the researcher's city, or close enough that you can be reached on the researcher's turn. Remember all cards are open. If I'm the researcher I can see that you have 4 black cards and I have one, and that you just moved one city away from me. Maybe I should move there and give you my black card on my turn, even though we'll meet up in New York.
 
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