Recommend
5 
 Thumb up
 Hide
9 Posts

Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game» Forums » Reviews

Subject: A review from someone who is passionate about Yu-Gi-Oh! rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Mike Beiter
United States
Tonawanda
New York
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Of all the collectable card games I have played, (and I have played many) I consider Yu-Gi-Oh! to be one of the best for a number of reasons.

What appeals to me immediately about this game is a strong sense of balance and power shifting that you rarely find with other card games. In this game, a single card can turn the tide in your favor, only to have it be turned against you in the next round by one of your opponent’s cards. It is this back and forth sort of energy that keeps the game alive and exciting! I think it is far more rewarding and fun to have a well fought duel where both players can say “Wow, I thought I had you for a moment there.”, or “That was close.”
On an average game of Yu-Gi-Oh! I find my heart racing as the game progresses. The tension builds easily when you do not know what lies beneath a face down card, or if it is wise to sacrifice your monsters for a risky move. The rush you get from a game of Yu-Gi-Oh! is rarely equaled in most any other card game I have played. It does not take any time at all to get the energy going. On turn 1 you can unleash an assault that demands attention. Other card games can take several turns to build up and do anything.

Many people say that one of the elements of Yu-Gi-Oh! that they do not like is that by having the most powerful cards you will win. This is not completely true in my opinion, because this game possesses many common cards that can just as easily thwart the strongest of monsters that can be summoned. And that is where a lot of fun comes in! When my opponents takes a lot of time and plans their moves and summons a board dominating threat, only to have it washed away by a trap I had laid., that is a very satisfying move to make. Some times the simplest most direct strategy will win the day for you. The game does have cards that are the just as easy to summon as others, but have a higher attack rating so they appear “better”, but there are so many cards designed to enhance even the weakest creatures power to make them rival any summoned monster. Rarer is not always better.

Many card games like Magic the Gathering have a board dominating combo feel, in which the one who gains power early usually continues to gain momentum and their forces become unstoppable. I have seen countless games of MTG end where an opponent surrenders and says “what’s the point? There is no way I can beat you.”
In Yu-Gi-Oh! that is rarely the case. I like knowing that no matter how bad the odds look, no matter how hopeless the game feels that you can still bounce back if you get the right card. In the TV series they call this “The heart of the cards”. That rush you get when only 1 card will save you, and you get it!

Yu-Gi-Oh! does have its combo element. There are still ways to create lock downs and total board domination as in MTG, but it is a lot harder to pull off, and I am thankful for it. This game can be simple enough for the younger or less strategic minded crowd yet has the potential for a mastermind plot deviser to show off their stuff, and each philosophy can hold their own.

The game has very few restrictions on how you can build a deck, which opens many doors of possibilities. I think that is the reason why I don’t mind how few cards you get in a pack for the price. In Yu-Gi-Oh! you can open a pack and use all the cards. There are no casting cost restrictions based on color that force you to limit what you use. Most any spell or trap can be used in any deck. True there are some more gimmicky spells that need certain monsters to be of any value, and I am seeing this more and more with the newer sets. But as a whole you can match up creatures of all elemental types and not be bound by any restrictions to summon them.
And as far as cost restrictions go, I like how Yu-Gi-Oh! has eliminated casting costs. That is another quirk that I hate about MTG in that it is dependent on you drawing the right land cards to be able to cast you spells. If you have a bad draw, you can’t cast your spells, and you sit there bored and frustrated while your opponent has all the fun. But in Yu-Gi-Oh! you always can cast your creatures and spells, save for your higher level monsters, and you should only have a couple in any well made deck to eliminate a hand full of monsters you can not summon.
I think a well made game should not limit the player’s fun due to a bad draw. I like when any card combination in your hand gives you a shot to win; but from a different angle depending on what’s in your hand. Maybe I have a hand full of traps and spells? Then I can spend my time holding off my opponent until the creatures arrive, and vise versa.
Overall it is a very well made game. I think there are some power cards that need to be toned down. But many of the very powerful cards in this game have severe restrictions and are extremely difficult to get out on the field, so you had to earn the right to play it by good strategy. Hence the tribute monsters... If you want to get a Blue Eyes White Dragon on the field, you have to play hard to get it; and the few cards that let you sneak it into play easy have weaknesses of their own. And even if Blue Eyes hits the table, there are tons of cards that anyone can own that will destroy it. The game really has a strong balance. They saw the overpowered cards they made and banned them to keep the game fair. I am thankful for the banned list.

Another more humorous element of the game is the comparison to the TV show. In this show you have your hero who is always paired up against an opponent who incessantly taunts them and makes a big show out of each card they play. It becomes so dramatic and intense from that perspective. When playing with some of my friends, we will occasionally slip into show dialogue and come off like a super villain as we explain our cards. It shows the game does not take it self too seriously. It allows you to have fun and be a kid or just be someone outside of yourself. Get lost in the moment of the duel and just have fun!

I give this game 9 out of 10 as far as card games go. It is not perfect, and has its flaws like any other. But I really feel a sense of balance and a level playing field with this game. A match of Yu-Gi-Oh! can be an adventure every time you play!
3 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Armando Gurrola
United States
Houston
Texas
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Good review. I wouldn't touch another ccg with a ten foot pole, but enjoyed reading the review. I was a Magic player at one time and enjoy the comparisons to it. I don't play ccgs anymore but can see the wonders of not having to be mana screwed in a game of Magic.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Matt Olson
Australia
Darlington
WA
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Personally, I like the mana cost in MtG. I like that it gives a beginning, middle and end to the game. Sure, sometimes it doesn't workout, but take the loss as a bad draw and play another round.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ken B.
United States
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Y'know, I kind of dig Yu-Gi-Oh. It's far more complex than its original target audience can handle...I can't count how many times I would be at the card store years ago and just watch really young kids totally misplay the game, make up rules, and in general flub their way through the game.

Seriously, a game for 8-year olds with life points in the thousands? Whose idea was this?




My only real problem with the game is how pronounced the rare/uncommon/common situation is. Many CCGs make an effort to print commons that are either high utility or are at least interesting in the right decks. WWE's Raw Deal had most of its important reversal cards as commons; many Magic uncommons are just as good (and less specialized) than their rare counterparts.

Yu-Gi-Oh, though...I mean, let's get serious for a second. Any creature that's 4 stars or less plays for free. So is there any reason why you get a rare creature that plays for free, has special gametext, and sports 1900 power, compared to a common creature that plays for free, has no special gametext, and has 300 power? I mean, seriously?



Good review, though. I've really enjoyed the Yu-Gi-Oh videogames that allow you to play the game without dropping large amounts of coin chasing super rares. There's one for the Playstation 2 that came out not too long ago that has a role-playing game tied to the collection of the cards, and it's actually pretty cool. I've also played through one of the ones on Game Boy and also the Xbox one. There's some good tactical fun in there once you strip out the "spend $$ for rares" stuff.


1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
wayne r
United States
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I actually enjoyed the console versions of the game. I think Yu-Gi-Oh going to videogame format is a better business plan than Magic going online. I like that you only need to buy the game only once if you like the occassional match. If you want to play online or over wi-fi, you may have to keep up with the yearly editions but it is still cheaper than MTG Online and you get a lot more.

I've noticed other cardgames being transferred to consoles such as Pokemon, Marvel, and FullMetal Alchemist ccg but no ccg has ben as successful as Yu-Gi-Oh when it comes to going to electronic format. I was disappointed when MTG decided to discontinue their original computer game model. When I heard that buying booster packs cost the same in electronic format as the dead tree counterpart, the online game lost its appeal.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mike Beiter
United States
Tonawanda
New York
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I wish the PS3 or Wii would come out with a Yu-Gi-Oh! game.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
P. Oka
United States
Fort Mitchell
Kentucky
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Good review. I haven't played in ages, but this makes me want to dust off the decks and give it another shot.

As far as expense goes, the game can be played relatively cheaply if both players buy one of the Structure Decks, which have a nice mix of cards based around a theme and strategy.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Harald Korneliussen
Norway
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
MajaiofDreams wrote:
When playing with some of my friends, we will occasionally slip into show dialogue and come off like a super villain as we explain our cards. It shows the game does not take it self too seriously


I haven't seen the TV series, but I'm reading the manga right now. Despite the high number of embarrasingly cheesy clichés, it's really entertaining - at least for a game geek. It touches on to a wide variety of competitive games, from air-hockey and yo-yos at the light end to role-playing games and historic games at the heavy. Seeing a real d10 in a mainstream comic almost brought a tear to my eye!

Is it correct that the TV series only focuses on the collectible card game?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Joe F.
United States
Seattle
Washington
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
vintermann wrote:
I haven't seen the TV series, but I'm reading the manga right now. Despite the high number of embarrasingly cheesy clichés, it's really entertaining - at least for a game geek. It touches on to a wide variety of competitive games, from air-hockey and yo-yos at the light end to role-playing games and historic games at the heavy. Seeing a real d10 in a mainstream comic almost brought a tear to my eye!

Is it correct that the TV series only focuses on the collectible card game?


It's true: after seeing things like Yugi trapped in a tabletop RPG in the manga, it was a disappointment to see that the anime completely ignores anything other than the mediocre CCG. "Yu-Gi-Oh: the Abridged Series" on Youtube is quite amazing, however.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.