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Subject: The Brooklyn Museum's Stewart Culin Archival Collection rss

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I found this website while doing some research on Stewart Culin:

http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/research/digital-collections/c...

In case any of you don't know, Stewart culin was one of the leading historians/anthropologists on the study and documenation of games and cultures. To quote the website:

Quote:
Although he had no formal training, Robert Stewart Culin (1858-1929) is known today as an expert on games as well as for his museum work. [...] Culin's collecting methodology in many ways exemplified the attitudes and assumptions of the heyday of anthropological collecting known as the "museum age" (1875-1925). His major focus was to understand the "language of things," which resulted in innovative exhibitions and collaboration with several colleagues, especially in the worlds of fashion and design. He was a meticulous record keeper whose exhaustive documentation practices, unique to museums today, created a level of documentation that set standards in the field. Culin endeavored to document both the meanings and the origins of the objects he collected. [...] Culin amassed an extensive research collection, including correspondence, manuscripts (his own and those of others), reports, publications, and clippings. A full visual record complementing the written documentation includes photographs, sketches, watercolors, oil paintings, postcards, and other illustrative study material. The depth and range of the information available in the Culin Archival Collection make it a critical resource for the study of cultural anthropology, art and cultural history, costume and textile design, ethnology, folklore, linguistics, museology, and photography on an international scale. The collection contains valuable information on the development of ethnology as a discipline, on the part played by museums in presenting and interpreting objects and cultures, and on the social and economic consequences, within native communities, of large-scale systematic collecting.


Anyone interested in the study of games or the history of games would do well to study Culin and his achievements. Also, Google Bookshelf has a number of his books available to download in PDF form if you are so inclined.

Enjoy!

Stewart Culin circa 1920


EDIT: Also, here is the complete bibliography of Stewart Culin from the website (Those related to games are in red):

Numismatics: Notes upon the Collection of Chinese Coins Belonging to the Museum. Philadelphia: Pennsylvania Museum of Art, 1885.

The Religious Ceremonies of the Chinese in the Eastern Cities of the United States. Privately printed. Philadelphia Oriental Club, 1887.

“China in America: A Study in the Social Life of the Chinese in the Eastern Cities of the United States.” Paper read before the American Association for the Advancement of Science, New York. Privately printed. Philadelphia, 1887.

“Chinese Drug Stores in America.” American Journal of Pharmacy 59 (1887): 593-98.

“The Practice of Medicine by the Chinese in America.” The Medical and Surgical Reporter 56 (1887): 355-57.

Chinese Games with Dice. Philadelphia: Franklin Printing Co., 1889.

“The I Hing or Patriotic Rising: A Secret Society among the Chinese in America.” Numismatic and Antiquarian Society of Philadelphia, Proceedings, 1887-89. Philadelphia: Numismatic and Antiquarian Society, 1890.

“Chinese Secret Societies in the United States.” Journal of American Folklore 3 (1890): 39-43.

“Customs of the Chinese in America.” Journal of American Folklore 3 (1890): 191-200.

“Street Games of Boys in Brooklyn, New York.” Journal of American Folklore 4 (1891): 221-37.

“The Gambling Games of the Chinese in America: Fan T'an, the Game of Repeatedly Spreading Out, and Pak Kop Piu, or the Game of White Pigeon Ticket. University of Pennsylvania, Publications, Series in Philology, Literature, and Archaeology, vol. 1 no. 4. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, 1891.

Catalogo de las colecciones arqueologicas: seccion de arqueologia y paleontologia, Universidad de Pensilvania. Madrid: Sucesores de Rivadeneyra, 1892.

“East Indian Fortune Telling with Dice; Syrian Games with Knuckle Bones; Tip Cats.” Numismatic and Antiquarian Society of Philadelphia, Proceedings, 1890-91. Philadelphia: Numismatic and Antiquarian Society, 1892.

Objects Used in Religious Ceremonies, and Charms and Implements for Divination. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, 1892.

The Museums of Archaeology at the University of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, 1893.

“Mancala: The National Game of Africa.” U.S. National Museum, Annual Report (1894): 595-607.

“Retrospect of the Folklore of the Columbian Exposition.” Journal of American Folklore 7 (1894): 51-59.

“The Value of Games in Ethnology.” American Association for the Advancement of Science, Proceedings 43 (1894): 355-58.

“Chinese Games with Dice and Dominoes.” U.S. National Museum, Annual Report 1893 (1895): 489-537.

Korean Games, with Notes on the Corresponding Games of China and Japan. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, 1895. (Reprint: Dover, 1991.)

Archaeological Objects Exhibited by the Department of Archaeology and Paleontology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1895.

“Dominoes, the National Game of China.” Overland Monthly (November 1895): 559-65.

Commemoration of the Fourth Centenary of the Discovery of America, Columbian Historical Exposition, Madrid. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1895.

“Catalogue of Ethnographical Objects from Somaliland and the Galla Country Collected by Dr. A. Donaldson Smith, in the Museum of Science and Art, University of Pennsylvania.” In Through Unknown African Countries. London: Edward Arnold, 1897.

“Chess and Playing-Cards.” U.S. National Museum, Annual Report 1896 (1898): 665-942.

“American Indian Games.” Presidential address, American folklore Society, 1897. University of Pennsylvania, Free Museum of Science and Art, Bulletin 1 (1898): 99-117 .

Hawaiian Games. In American Anthropologist (n.s.) 1 (1899): 201-47. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1899.

Philippine Games. In American Anthrolopologist (n.s.) 2 (1900): 643-56. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1900.


“Primitive American Art.” University of Pennsylvania, Bulletin 4 (1900): 191-96.

“The Origin of Ornament.” University of Pennsylvania, Free Museum of Science and Art, Bulletin 2 (1900): 235-42.

Bibliography of Daniel G. Brinton, M.D. Memorial volume. Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 1900.

“A Summer Trip Among the Western Indians.” University of Pennsylvania, Free Museum of Science and Art, Bulletin 3 (1901): 1-22, 88-117, 143-75.

“The Indians of Cuba.” University of Pennsylvania, Free Museum of Science and Art, Bulletin 3 (1902): 185-226.

“American Indian Games.” American Anthropologist (n.s.) 5 (1903): 58-64.

“America, the Cradle of Asia: An Address.” American Association for the Advancement of Science, Proceedings 52 (1903): 493-500.

A Trooper's Narrative of Service in the Anthracite Coal Strike. Philadelphia: Jacobs & Co., 1903.

“Hopi Indian Masks from a Cave in the Canon de Chelly, Arizona.” Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, Museum News 1 (1906): 80-81.

Games of the North American Indians. Bureau of American Ethnology, 24th Annual Report, 1902-03 (1907). (Reprint: Dover, 1975, and University of Nebraska Press, 1992.)

“Dolls of the Zuni Indians.” Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, Museum News, 2 (1907): 78-79.

“Guide to the Southwestern Indian Hall.” Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, Museum News, 2 (1907): 105-11.

“Hopi Ceremonial Frames and Standard from a Cave in the Canon de Chelly, Arizona.” Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, Museum News, 2 (1907): 112-13.

“What is a Museum?” Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, Museum News, 6 (1911): 99-101.

“Book Collecting in India and the Far East.” Public Libraries 20 (1915): 195-97.

Bibliography of Japan: Costume, Armor, Flower Arrangement, Gardens, Archery, Architecture, Games, Sculpture. Brooklyn: Museum of the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, 1916.

“Indian Stairway.” Brooklyn Museum Quarterly 5 (1918): 79-81.

“No Drama of Japan.” Brooklyn Museum Quarterly 5 (1918): 121-23.

“Christian Relics from Japan.” Brooklyn Museum Quarterly 5 (1918): 141-52.

“Japanese Announcements and Programs.” Brooklyn Museum Quarterly 5 (1918): 211-17.

“The Story of the Carved Pilasters from the Franciscan Church of Our Lady of Guadalupe at Zuni, New Mexico.” Good Furniture 10 (1918): 233-39.

“Japanese Color Prints Illustrating Samuel Smiles's Self-Help.” Brooklyn Museum Quarterly 6 (1919): 111-16.

“Notes on Cochiti, New Mexico, by Noel Dumarest.” American Anthropological Association, Memoirs 6 (1919): 135-236.

“Chinese Pictures.” Brooklyn Museum Quarterly 7 (1920): 117-21.

“The Japanese Game of Sugoroku.” Brooklyn Museum Quarterly 7 (1920): 213-33.

“Tales from the House in the Valley.” American Indian Magazine 7 (1920): 11-17.

“Peasant Costumes and Textiles of Central Europe.” Brooklyn Museum Quarterly 8 (1921): 69-77.

“Peasant Arts of Hungary.” Brooklyn Museum Quarterly 9 (1922): 113-14.

“Pistyan.” Brooklyn Museum Quarterly 9 (1922): 81-89.

Slovak Textile Patterns. Brooklyn: Brooklyn Museum, 1922.

“European Costumes and Ceramics, Museum Exhibition, 1923.” Brooklyn Museum Quarterly 10 (1923): 61-70.

Primitive Negro Art, Chiefly from the Belgian Congo. Brooklyn: Brooklyn Museum, 1923.

“Negro Art.” Brooklyn Museum Quarterly 10 (1923): 119-32.

“Negro Art.” Arts 3 (1923): 347-50.

“Industrial Art Education in Germany.” Brooklyn Museum Quarterly 11 (1924): 55-64.

“Creation in Art.” Brooklyn Museum Quarterly 11 (1924): 91-100.

“Illustrations of the Romance of Amir Hamzah.” Brooklyn Museum Quarterly 11 (1924): 139-43.

“The Game of Ma-jong: Its Origin and Significance.” Brooklyn Museum Quarterly 11 (1924): 153-168.

“The Magic of Color.” Brooklyn Museum Quarterly 12 (1925): 99-103.

“Burri-burri Gitcho: A Japanese Swinging Bat Game.” Brooklyn Museum Quarterly 12 (1925): 133-38.

“The Japanese Game of Battledore and Shuttlecock.” Brooklyn Museum Quarterly 12 (1925): 139-50.


“A Korean Map of the World.” Brooklyn Museum Quarterly 12 (1925): 183-93.

The Japanese Festival Calendar. Brooklyn: Brooklyn Museum, 1925.

The Philosophy of Dress. New York: Bonwit Teller, 1925.

“The Road to Beauty.” Brooklyn Museum Quarterly 14 (1927): 41-50.

“Japanese Art.” In Encyclopaedia Britannica, 14th edition. New York: Encyclopaedia Brittanica, 1933.
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