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Subject: Disclose Your Sources rss

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Josh
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I'm interested to know where the posters here on RSP go to get their information. I'm thinking primarily in regards to current events, and thus politics (including editorials and frankly partisan content). The four media that immediately leap to mind are radio, TV, print, and Internet. Feel free to editorialize as much as you would like. My interest is partially sheer curiosity, but I'd also like to expose myself to new sources of information.

Radio: I'd imagine that most people who listen to the radio do so in their car, or maybe on the job. I listen to almost no radio at all. My wife will listen to NPR in the kitchen, so sometimes I hear a bit of it (almost always "Marketplace" just by the timing of the show), but I get basically no information from radio. Way back in 1994 I worked a job where I drove a van for several hours a day, and the van only had AM radio, so I listened to about two hours of Rush Limbaugh daily, but I've heard almost no talk radio since.

TV: The only thing I consistently watch is "60 Minutes," which I admire and enjoy a lot. I might watch the national nightly news a few times a year. I never watch local news. I avoid CNN and Headline News like the plague.

Print: I get most of my news from The Economist. I've tried all the major newsweeklies, and it's my favorite by far. There's an education in every issue. I'd subscribed to Newsweek for years, but there's been a decline in quality over the last five years or so. Despite the fact that I have not paid for it for two years, issues keep arriving, so I read it. Fareed Zakaria writes some interesting stuff, and I like to read George Will, although I agree with him about 15% of the time. Other than that, Newsweek is shallow. I get The Atlantic, which can be outstanding, and always contains something of interest. I read the Sunday Boston Globe, which I'm ambivalent about.

Internet: I make a daily stop by CNN.com just to keep up on the petty stuff that is news in the broadest sense, but is generally unimportant, and won't make it into The Economist (e.g. some kind of celeb hoopla, who's the latest missing woman du jour, etc.). The only political website I frequent is Reason.com, not because I'm a libertarian (though I share some overlapping sympathies and interests), but rather that it's so damn entertaining.

How about you guys?

BTW, does anyone know the proper formatting of the titles of TV shows, magazines, newspapers, etc., and NOT in bibliography format. That info's been flushed from the ol' brain long ago, and Google isn't helping.
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Ken
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Radio: NPR when I listen, usually streamed over the Internet. I tend to actually stream a station in CA because it lets me catch the morning news programs as my morning goes from "initial chaos" to more settled and lunch time.

TV: I ignore TV news except to tune into known hacks to laugh at them bloviating. Or at their bloviating if it's funny enough. Very rarely I'll throw on MSNBC or CNN for "background noise" while eating lunch.

Print: Chicago Tribune daily, Economist frequently, Scientific American, and occasionally other papers/magazines. We do get the local paper where I live, but their national/international coverage is generally just the AP so that's primarily for local stuff. Plus I don't like their editorial slant (very, very right wing).

Internet: Google News generally, CNN occasionally. The NYT, Washington Post, and WSJ on a fairly regular basis (usually from my cell phone). I generally avoid the political sites because they rapidly exceed my constitution's tolerance for spewed bile.

For formatting titles, see this. It's as good a guide as any.
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Google News... which links to a plethora of sources of all ideological persuasions.

Like you were, I am now driving my older car with only AM. Plus the radio will barely tune in anything. Best reception is the station with Limbaugh but since he's off the air by 1pm here and I work in the morning I mainly listen to the local talk show. The host is a recent transplant from Atlanta and seems conservative. Best thing he has going though is virtually every day he has an Idaho Senator, congressman, the governer or other senior elected official.

I watch Fox in the evening from time to time because I enjoy the guests. For all the carping they are NOT balanced it's rare to see any of the controversial shows without an equal number of liberal and conservative panelists. But my favorite show and the reason I have Fox on the speed dial is Neil Cavuto in the afternoon. I really like his show because the guests just attack the subject of money. Cavuto beat up O'Reilly on the oil companies and his bulldog style has shredded more than one uppity expert ranging from Ben Stein to scores of Wall Street CEO's.

RSP is an excellent source of data mining as well. While I detest that people "prove their point" by just dropping a link in... which proves nothing... sometimes the links are great.
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Jorge Montero
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No radio for me, at all. I'd rather get my roadside politics from Iron Maiden.

Little actual TV: I watch Colbert, Stewart and Maher on occasion, but mostly for the laughs.

I do go through a substantial amount of internet media though: I use google news as a general aggregator, and read 3 major Spanish newspapers(1 socialist, 1 pro business, and 1 socially conservative), a local Spanish one, to know what in the world my mother rants about, the local St Louis rag(Post Dispatch), NYT, The Economist, Christian Science Monitor, The Nation, some WSJ, the Guardian and the BBC, set to European headlines.

I also read about a dozen RSS feeds from different news-oriented blogs, from Kos and Crooks & Liars to Marginal Revolution and The New Capitalist, there's also a few selected ones on world affairs, immigration, religion and technology.

And finally, the secret weapon: 4 or 5 lectures a week from Fora TV, for all those topics that most other options won't cover in a million years. Differences in elementary and high school education methodologies? Theological debates between catholics and protestant literalists? Difficulties in providing school lunches using fresh produce? All on Fora.
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Ashfield
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Textbooks, Wikipedia, making stuff up.
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Jeff
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I don't have cable and I don't watch much news programming. When I did have a TV, I had a certain fondness for CSPAN.

I also don't listen to news radio or subscribe to any news periodicals. I rely almost exclusively on newfangled interweb sources.

I subscribe to an overwhelming amount of RSS feeds. Mostly I use them for entertainment, technology, gaming and other "light news." I also subscribe to a small number of high-volume feeds; NYT, AP and a local paper, along with Wonkette, Politico and Salon on the new media side. I use those to whet my appetite, and stories that I find intriguing I'll research further on Google News. I quite enjoy Dan Carlin's Common Sense podcast, and I can always count on folks around here to keep me apprised of any events I miss.
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J
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-Yahoo/Google/other web searches by subject
-CNN/Fox News/MSNBC
-Wikipedia
-Thin air
-Your Mom
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Benny
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That's wonderful. Good for you! I've always wanted to have a haunted house. It's been my lifelong dream!
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NPR is my only consistent source of news.

On-line I keep up with Slate mostly to be annoyed.

I really don't consider anything from the TV to be news.
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Economist for current events

Web Searches for anything else


As an aside - why is anyone interested in near-realtime information (CNN, TV news, daily newspapers)? What I see is large amounts of lower-quality information (due to the emphasis on speed) which does not affect me in near-realtime, if at all.
For example, that plane that crashed in New York. I'm on the other side of the world, and didn't know anyone on the plane. Why do I care when I get the information (if at all) about the crash?
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Snowball
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Internet for everyday news and book inspiration.
I like the internet because it is very easy to read from very different sources with different or conflicting interests. For example I would read the http://english.pravda.ru/ for news about Georgia, then a belgian or french site, then a us one. At this point of course I do not have the slightest chance of knowing where the truth is

For the rest I read books, usually with a conflicting point of view.

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Colleen
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Say what you want about conservative talk radio, but it's the only media outlet around here that discusses local bills up for vote and local politics with any fullness. I listen to Mark Belling and Jay Weber shows in my car to and from work.

I watch very little television and no news.

I read no magazines or newspapers.

I read books and some random google searches for news.

I don't trust our media sources to report fairly anymore. I nearly shut them out. If I hear about an issue that interests me, I will research it on the web and maybe look at some academic journals on the topic.
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Ken
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colleens wrote:
I don't trust our media sources to report fairly anymore.


That's really a fairly poignant commentary on the state of our media.

My suggestion - look for the sources that get mentioned most often in this thread and start following them. I'll bet I can name some consistent mentions that'll show up now, but I don't want to look like I'm trying to steer the thread.

There are good outlets out there, but it does take at least a bit of work to find them sometimes. If you do have NPR locally, I'd strongly urge you to find it - they'll likely to a very good job of covering local/state issues.
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pronoblem baalberith
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Radio - NPR (1.5 hours in commute). Coast 2 Coast AM does not count as news but I do lisen an hour or so at night when going to bed.

TV - I've watched five hours of TV in the past six months. It was Frontline or American Experience when I did. I would watch 60 Minutes if I could. I used to watch it faithfully but now it conflicts with game day.

Internet - Google news for headlines. Masslive for local. Guardian, BBC, Christian Science Monitor, Debka, CNN.

Print - Wall Street Journal, Boston Globe, Valley Advocate.
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colleens wrote:
Say what you want about conservative talk radio, but it's the only media outlet around here that discusses local bills up for vote and local politics with any fullness. I listen to Mark Belling and Jay Weber shows in my car to and from work.


Truth.

I did some research on the local AM host I listen to. He claims no affiliation but since he's bracketed by Limbaugh, Hannity and then some idiot named Savage I'd put him at least center-right.

Mostly, the newspapers are full of ads and political rhetoric. Local news is pointless, I can get current weather easier online. That leaves the Internet and even then you have to wade through a lot of weeds to get actual news. When this local guy, Nate Shelman, brings on live politicians and they take live calls and answer questions unscripted, then you can learn what's up.

I'll second the notion that the pathetic state of the media makes the chore of being an informed citizen a daunting task. No wonder so many people just ignore reality and tune in American Idol or whatever tripe passes for entertainment.
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William Boykin
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1) MSM- I read the Washington Post, Washington Times, New York Times, The Economist, and the Austin American Statesman.

2) Don't watch TV anymore, but when I did, about the only news I would watch would be the News Hour. The rest is just too fluffy- good for knowing that something 'happened', but I'd have to do my own research for greater content.

3) Online, I read Bloomberg and the Wall Street Journal. Economic news is about the only thing that ages so quickly as to be useless a month later.

4) Mostly, however, I read books. Which means that while I might be a bit behind the times, I get greater context/clarity from reading a journalist writing in a book about an issue after several years of research than I do from reading what small part of the elephant they see 'RIGHT NOW'.

Darilian
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Phil
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Internet: Slate, Time, The Economist, Panda's Thumb, Sci Am

Podcasts: Skeptic's Guide to The Universe

Radio: NPR

TV: Charlie Rose

Magazine: Skeptic, and some journals

So, my current events are heavily biased towards recent scientific discoveries and issues. It's still current events, but those things are more relevant for me - so I naturally gravitate toward them. I also find many of the discussions surrounding them far more interesting. Really, there are only so many hours in a day, and you can't have both breadth and depth.

I tried following politics for a while, but I became jaded. Ultimately, I felt like lots of the "news" coming from either TV sources or AM radio was just gossip that never amounted to anything. Blah, blah, Bush made a faux pas here, blah, blah, Obama is a socialist, blah. Just tedious. No insight or depth at all. Even though I like NPR and Charlie Rose better than most, they still have their moments of sheer inanity.

I also listened to a local guy for a while, but I can't stand the "call in" format. Beg the question - get the response you're looking for. "Cock-fighting - it's vile, depraved, and evil. Should it be legal in New Mexico?"

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