Recommend
8 
 Thumb up
 Hide
3 Posts

Agricola» Forums » Sessions

Subject: My First Win: Family, Food, and Flexibility rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Greg Jones
United States
Washington
flag msg tools
My strategy from looking at my occupations and minor improvements kind of centered around the Reeve. He gives you 4 wood immediately if you play him early, and makes a 3VP bonus available for the player with the most occupations at the end of the game. I felt like I also had some reasonable cards for getting food - actually just a bonus when taking Travelling Players and a bonus when taking Fishing. So I felt like I'd be able to keep up with the necessary food expenditure to stay in the lead on occupations.

I sort of rethought that plan when Laura played a minor improvement ahead of me that got a bonus on Fishing also. So I would be competing with her for that. But I still had Travelling Players, and sometimes I would probably still get Fishing.

I thought the 4 wood from the Reeve would build me some fences and kickstart an animal strategy. So for my first turn I took the 2 clay, and quickly I built a Fireplace. However, Meetha built a Cooking Hearth, and she was for several rounds just a little less patient than me with the accumulation of animals. She got most of them 2 at a time and cooked them right away. I did get a breeding population of boars, though, the first turn there were two available at a time, while Meetha grabbed three sheep.

Dan was grabbing up reeds whenever they appeared in any numbers, and soon the reason was apparent. He had the Axe, which let him add rooms for a heavy discount in wood. He built two rooms at a time with 4 reeds and not too much wood. Now he was ready for some more family members. I had been the first to build rooms, and Meetha the second, but Dan now how a couple turns to add family members at his leisure with no competition, because the other players didn't have space.

I played the Ratcatcher, a mean little card that prevents the other players from using one of their family members in two rounds. This didn't seem to slow them down too much, though.

Meetha played the riding plow, which lets you plow three fields instead of one, and used that to fill up her board with about 8 fields. Laura built a large pasture to fill up most of her board, and Dan filled the remaining space on his board late in the game with a 2x5 pasture across the middle of his board, split into two sections. I filled up my board with a combination of those approaches. I had an occupation that let me plow extra fields by paying food, which I used a couple times to get to 5 fields, and I added onto my existing fences to fill up the rest of the space.

In the end I did get the Reeve bonus, shared with Laura, for 5 occupations. Dan was notable in the game for playing very few cards. He had a couple major improvements, a couple minor improvements, and I think no occupations whatsoever.

I won with 38 points.

I think the main thing I did right in this game was to properly play an animal strategy. Once you get a breeding population of animals, it pretty much just makes food on its own. Grain-based strategies look like they could do that too. After all, if you sow you get 1 grain every harvest the same as you breed one animal every harvest. However, there are more actions to take to get this going and convert the result to food.

I'd tried to focus on animals before, but never really got it right. The trick is fences are really a prerequisite. You can put one animal in your house, and maybe one in a stable, but once they breed you have nowhere to put the new animal. To make breeding work, you need space for at least three animals, and fences just make the most sense for this. So in this game I made an effort to get my fences up early.

Once I had a nice pen full of animals, I didn't have to scramble just to make ends meet, and I was able to focus on long term plans. I didn't have to grab the food space on the first turn of a harvest round, and I could take something competitive instead. I might plan to take a food space late in the round to avoid cooking an animal, but if it got taken it wouldn't be disastrous. I often found myself planning sequences up to four actions long, likely extending into the next round or the next. It would be nice if I finished within the round, for example to sow or get an extra breeding animal before the harvest, or to build fences so I could take and keep more animals on an early turn next round, but if there was no way to fit it in that was ok.

I also didn't really have a plan for my house, as I have before. I just grabbed clay or wood, whichever was available. Previously, I've planned to be "efficient" by building up my house as a wood house and then remodelling it. This time, I just let the tactical situation decide. In the past I've usually built up to a 5-room stone house. This time I just got to a 4-room clay house.
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
J H
United States
Billings and Bozeman
Montana
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Cool session report!

The title made it sound like it might be kinky...

3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dan Silverman
United States
Waltham
Massachusetts
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
morningstar wrote:
Dan was grabbing up reeds whenever they appeared in any numbers, and soon the reason was apparent. He had the Axe, which let him add rooms for a heavy discount in wood. He built two rooms at a time with 4 reeds and not too much wood. Now he was ready for some more family members.


I had to do a double-take when I read this. Because I played Agricola a month or so ago, and did exactly this. And my name is Dan.

Fun read!
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.