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Subject: World War II Production Centers rss

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Michael Tan
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I was hoping to solicit some fact checking and feedback of my research by WWII grognards. The production model in Sturm Europa! is based on the concept of unit specific production centers. You receive a base MPP allowance for owning territories ala the standard IPC, WERP, BRP, PP whatever you want to call it model... But the types of units you can build is rate limited by how many aircraft factories, shipyards, and tank factories you own. Each factory on the map allows you to produce one unit per turn. I've calculated limits based on historical production figures and in some cases uptapped potential. That part was easy as that data is readily available from many sources. The challenge has been figuring out WHERE the production centers should go. The WHERE is important because the production centers can be BOMBED and CAPTURED. I haven't been able to find a resource that has compiled that sort of information into one place - does anybody know of one? The list below is what I've come up with by piece-mealing data together. It's important to note that I don't intend to represent every factory or shipyard, just the most significant ones. I can't imagine any one person knows all of this off-hand (I'd be a little worried about you if you did), but perhaps people live near some of these more famous sites or have grandparents who worked in these factories and know where the critical production areas were?

FRANCE
Aircraft Factory (2)
- Paris (Morane-Saulnier, Potez, Bloch)
- Toulouse (Dewoitine, Breguet)

Shipyard (2)
- Brest / St Nazaire / Lorient / Nantes (Arsenal de Brest, AC de St. Nazaire, Arsenal de Lorient, AC Loire)
- Toulon / La Seyne-sur-Mer (Arsenal de Toulon / FCM)

Tank Factory (1)
- Paris (Renault, Somua, Hotchkiss)

GERMANY
Aircraft Factory (2)
- Munchen (Messerschmitt, BMW)
- Dessau (Junkers)

Shipyard (2)
- Kiel (Germaniawerft, Blohm & Voss)
- Wilhelmshaven (Kriegsmarinewerft)

Tank Factory (2)
- Kassel (Henschel & Son)
- Stuttgart (Daimler-Benz, Porsche)

ITALY
Aircraft Factory (1)
- Milan / Turin / Varese (Fiat, Macchi, Savoia-Marchetti, Caproni)

Shipyard (2)
- Genoa (Ansaldo)
- Trieste (CRDA)

Tank Factory (0)

RUSSIA (pre industrial relocation in Summer 1941)
Aircraft Factory (3)
- Moscow (Ilyshin, Tupolev)
- Moscow (Yakovlev)
- Moscow (Lavochkin, Mikoyan)

Shipyard (3)
- Leningrad
- Molotovsk
- Nikolayev

Tank Factory (4)
- Gorky (KSF)
- Stalingrad (STZ)
- Leningrad (Kirov)
- Kharkiv (KhPZ)

UNITED KINGDOM
Aircraft Factory (3)
- London / Hatfield (Hawker, de Haviland)
- Manchester (Avro)
- Southhampton (Supermarine)

Shipyard (3)
- Clydebank (John Brown, Fairfield)
- Newcastle (Vickers-Armstrongs, Swan Hunter)
- Lancashire /Mersey (Cammell Laird, Vickers-Armstrongs)

Tank Factory (2)
- Lancashire, Sheffield (Leyland, English Electric, Vickers, Vulcan)
- London (Vauxhall Motors)
OR (can't decide which was more important)
- Birmingham (Nufffield)
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Oh my God They Banned Kenny
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You're obviously going to have to 'simplify' things somewhat. In some cases production of a certain 'type' was rather 'decentralized' (e.g. aircraft or tank engine production might be widely separated from production of other components / final assembly. Then again there were 'changes' over time. New facilities were contructed, production facilities were 'moved' (you alluded to the most famous, the Soviet factory 'evacuation', the Germans also tried moving some key production into mountainous caverns as they were getting pounded by strat bombing). The CSW Literary Corner, WWII history folder would be an excellent place to post this question.
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Oh my God They Banned Kenny
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In fact I just posted it there, with an x-ref to this thread.
 
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deadkenny wrote:
You're obviously going to have to 'simplify' things somewhat. In some cases production of a certain 'type' was rather 'decentralized' (e.g. aircraft or tank engine production might be widely separated from production of other components / final assembly. Then again there were 'changes' over time. New facilities were contructed, production facilities were 'moved' (you alluded to the most famous, the Soviet factory 'evacuation', the Germans also tried moving some key production into mountainous caverns as they were getting pounded by strat bombing). The CSW Literary Corner, WWII history folder would be an excellent place to post this question.


Yeah I wasn't really even sure where to post this question. And yes I am definitely simplifying because like eveything else, the "real" answer to my question is far more complicated than what I'm looking to do. Another way to maybe pose the question is, what areas did the Allies (or Germans) bomb the most when they wanted to target tank or aircraft production. The naval stuff is easy because when they launch a hull for a battleship or carrier, it's sitting there for years sometimes before it was commissioned. That's obviously the location of the "shipyard".
 
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Michael Tan
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deadkenny wrote:
In some cases production of a certain 'type' was rather 'decentralized' (e.g. aircraft or tank engine production might be widely separated from production of other components / final assembly. Then again there were 'changes' over time. New facilities were contructed, production facilities were 'moved' (you alluded to the most famous, the Soviet factory 'evacuation', the Germans also tried moving some key production into mountainous caverns as they were getting pounded by strat bombing).


I think I have a nice mechanic that represents that abstractly. These centers represent your "base" production. They are static and never move. If they get captured they are devastated and can't be used by your opponent unless you "repair" them which involves paying a steep MPP cost. Each side has multiple cards like "Speer", "Great Patriotic War", "Home Front" that boost production that isn't placed on the map i.e. decentralized. So once a nation is in a state of total war, they have some production that can never be bombed.
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Pete Belli
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Looking forward to this game!

I remember reading something interesting about the Battle of Britain... the Germans had only a hazy idea of where certain British aircraft were produced. Specifically, I remember reading that the Germans repeatedly bombed a secondary factory while neglecting to target major raids against the complex where Rolls-Royce engines were built.

Of course, those Allied estimates of bomb damage inside Germany that were made during the conflict were also questionable.

My point is... should the players have such detailed information about enemy production capabilities?
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Michael Tan
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It's all about scale. Germany consists of 8 territories. Players pick a territory and roll dice. The odds of hitting the target are quite slim (1 in 6 per bomber). The results will be dubious at best until 1944 when the Allies have so many bombers that you can't miss if you're rolling 20+ dice in only 3 or 4 territories...

So to answer you question: player's DON'T really have detailed information. They have a 200x200 km area that they have to essentially carpet bomb to ensure they get the "tank production"...
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Jon M
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For UK ship building don't forget Belfast. Also aircraft production there.

Other places for production in the UK include anywhere there was a car plant (Dagenham, Luton, Liverpool, Coventry, Birmingham, Oxford, Derby etc) as all were converted to war production.

Even the far north of Scotland had war production (Beufighters were produced in a factory north of Aberdeen!)

I would have through that at your scale the UK would be quite simple as almost every area would have tank, aircraft and ship building.
 
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Michael Tan
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Jon_1066 wrote:
For UK ship building don't forget Belfast. Also aircraft production there.

Other places for production in the UK include anywhere there was a car plant (Dagenham, Luton, Liverpool, Coventry, Birmingham, Oxford, Derby etc) as all were converted to war production.

Even the far north of Scotland had war production (Beufighters were produced in a factory north of Aberdeen!)

I would have through that at your scale the UK would be quite simple as almost every area would have tank, aircraft and ship building.


Jon, Thanks for the reply. I think it can be said that once each nation was in total war economy mode that some production of every type of unit occured in every territory. The bombing of MPPs (general production) represents that. The idea with the production centers is that they represent "critical" concentrations of production. For instance in 1944 the 8th Air Force all but destroyed a Focke-Wulf factory in Marienburg that had been producing 1000 Fw 190s per month. It was one of the rare instances that precision bombing worked brilliantly. Another objective with production centers is to provide a easy method for players to track production limits without having to look for arbitrary numbers hidden in the rules.

I'm thinking of the following distribution for the UK:

Scapa Flow - 1 port (not shipyard)
Glasgow - 1 shipyard
Manchester (North Country) - 2 shipyards, 1 armor, 1 air
Birmingham (Midlands) - 1 armor, 1 air
London (Southern England) - 1 port (not shipyard), 1 air
Wales - nothing
N. Ireland - nothing

I knew they had a decent sized shipyard in Belfast but I think it was dwarfed by Newcastle, Liverpool, and Clydebank.
 
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Why so complicated? If you want your game to play quickly, perhaps you just let players declare what production they'd like to target and then refer to a chart or something.

 
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This is an interesting thread! Thanks for sharing what you're working on.

I've been working in a slightly different vein, regarding material resources such as iron ore and oil. Interesting that 2 wargamer geeks would be noodling some of the same ideas. (Deprivation of resource)

My idea was to have to pay for unit activation by expending fuel resources. As it turns out, so much of the action of WW2 was circling around the concepts of an adequate supply of war resources such as fuel oil and iron.

Wishing you the best on your project.

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falloutfan wrote:
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I've been working in a slightly different vein, regarding material resources such as iron ore and oil. Interesting that 2 wargamer geeks would be noodling some of the same ideas. (Deprivation of resource)

My idea was to have to pay for unit activation by expending fuel resources. As it turns out, so much of the action of WW2 was circling around the concepts of an adequate supply of war resources such as fuel oil and iron.


Great minds think alike.

The production model that I'm going with will be very much along the lines you are discussing. Production is now divided into 4 resources - manpower, ore, oil, and capital. Each territory is now rated for yielding some quantity of the four resources. Players will collect colored cubes (black for oil, grey for ore) at the start of each season. They need to immediately allocate them to one of six boxes on their force pool / player aid card:

Air: Ore and oil for building fighters and bombers.
Land: Manpower for building infantry. Ore and oil for armor.
Naval: Ore and oil for submarines, carriers, and surface ships.
Development: Capital and manpower for factories, tech, flak, and fortifications.
Operations. Ore for normal offensives. Ore and oil for blitz offensives.
Reserves: Ore, oil, and capital stockpiled for future use. Manpower cannot be saved.

As your units take hits you have the option to immediately pay for replacement steps (subject to restrictions) instead of taking a step loss and rebuilding it at the end of the turn. This method bypasses the typically time consuming and repetitive process of rebuilding damaged units. It also forces players to plan their purchases for each upcoming season.

It's elegent and much simpler than it sounds. For instance, Germany in Spring 1940 collects 5 manpower, 4 ore, 2 oil, 3 capital and also has 1 ore and 2 oil already in reserve. Planning an attack on France the German player places as follows:

Air: 1 ore and 1 oil for replacments.
Land: 4 manpower, 2 ore, 1 oil for replacements.
Naval: None.
Development: 1 manpower and 3 capital for tech research and factory.
Operations: 2 ore and 2 oil to activate two army groups for blitz offensives.
Reserves: Nothing. Hitler is going for broke. He's counting on a quick French collapsing and seizing their oil and ore reserves to replenish his stockpiles.
 
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p38_Lightning wrote:
Why so complicated? If you want your game to play quickly, perhaps you just let players declare what production they'd like to target and then refer to a chart or something.



That's what I decided to do. Bombers were never that accurate during WWII and Germany decentralized most of it's production by 1944. I decided it wasn't worth all the effort. UK, Germany, and France are so densely populated that you can pretty much bomb any industry. The simple abstraction for the Soviets is that you can only bomb their armor and air production in the Urals once they play the Industrial Relocation event. Before that you can bomb cities in European Russia but I doubt anyone would bother...
 
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Michael Tan
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We had a great discussion about this new production model on CSW:

http://talk.consimworld.com/WebX?7@114.wCYfek3MZDj.30@.1dd32...
 
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Imperious leader wrote:
This can't be in under 12 pages of rules, so its not longer even remotely the "holy grail" its now MT's Third Reich Version #2


How do you figure? These production rules are shorter than the old rules. They are under one page.
 
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Here's what I learned in my research. (Posted in the other thread) Feel free to use the data. I found it fascinating - especially the bit about the reserves Germany had at the beginning, verus what they captured etc.

Rommell mentioned in his memoirs how short the fuel supply was, and how relieved he was to capture fuel in France and Africa. In France, he basically capture an amount equivilent to 1/3 of the total German reserves!. (5 million barrels worth, compared to the 15 million barrels in reserve in 1940)

My thought is that paying with oil resources for troop movements, and even more for offensives, would be very interesting.

Of course, you'd have to pay to make tanks and planes too.



**********
Germany
Primary source of oil was Romania. Austria provided some oil too, as did a treaty with the Russians.
Primary source of iron ore was Sweden. Secondary source...Norway?
Captured about 5 million barrels between France and belgium.

Russia
Primary source of Oil was the Caucasus oil fields. (Grozny, Baku, Maikop)
Primary source of iron ore.....What is now known as the Ukraine?

Britain
Iron from the Midland quarries.
Oil from South America, the USA, and from British possessions in the South Pacific?

I'm looking at a scenario where the lack of strategic resources forces Germany to go on the offensive to acquire the material they need for war. Documentation I've found indicates that Germany had only strategic reserves of about 15 million barrels of oil at the start of WW2. This was believed to only be enough to maintain forward momentum until about 1941. So basically, they were desperate for resources, and had no domestic source for iron. Kinda tough to go to war against half the world on a shoe-string budget!
 
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Imperious leader wrote:


Nice resource. Thanks.

 
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'Iron ore' can be found all over Europe, it is materials such as nickel and manganese and chromium, critical alloys for making high quality metals that had specific areas of concentration and had to be imported. Scandanavia is rich in nickel, there is actually a really interesting historical legal battle over some nickel mines in Finland which were jointly owned by both what became 'Goering Industries' and a Canadian mining company--a legal battle only settled when Finland finally joined Germany and declared war on the USSR. And the only source of largescale heavy water production in Europe was in Norway--Allied efforts to deny this nuclear-use material to Germany included the French buying an entire year's production, sabotage the next year which dumped much of the production on the ground, a sinking of a ferry carrying most of the following year's production by a Norwegian commando. Hungary was also a key source for rare metals, for which Germany would not allow Admiral Horthy to surrender but instead saw essentially an invasion of the country in the middle of the war to maintain their supplies (as an aside, there had been a secret agreement during much of 1943 in which the Allies did not bomb targets in Hungary, in exchange for AA in Hungary not firing on Allied bombers, this went away once German crews were manning the AA guns).

I think the details here are way beyond the scope of your game, is not the point more to create 'for effect' rules which encourage players to protect, or target, certain locations? Interdiction of shipments from Sweden, halting mining operations in Hungary, or stopping oil refining in Romania, are all valid goals, I am not sure it really matters to most players exactly what they are doing there (though it would be nice to include some comments in the designer's notes for all this explanation). If you were to get into this level of production detail, it would seem equally important to give Britain choices such as whether to use convoys or not (shipping losses are generally higher without convoys, but convoys take longer to assemble and leave port, and must proceed at the speed of the slowest ship, so it is often possible to deliver more tons of cargo without convoys, even when the tonnage sunk is higher--this was the exact situation on the US East Coast in early 1942, the loss of more ships to submarines still resulted in more cargo being delivered, and America was not short of material to ship by then).

So, I think these sort of strategic issues come to a 'where do you stop?' point pretty rapidly. The areas that were fought over were all pretty valuable in several ways, while no one fought much over Morocco or Algeria because their economic and production value were negligible. And there were always substitutions made, as in if chromium is not available to make armour less brittle, a solution is to make armour thicker--provided the motors and drive trains can be built powerful enough to move it then. Clever engineers can work around many problems, until they are down to basically zero resources.
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falloutfan wrote:
I'm looking at a scenario where the lack of strategic resources forces Germany to go on the offensive to acquire the material they need for war. Documentation I've found indicates that Germany had only strategic reserves of about 15 million barrels of oil at the start of WW2. This was believed to only be enough to maintain forward momentum until about 1941. So basically, they were desperate for resources, and had no domestic source for iron. Kinda tough to go to war against half the world on a shoe-string budget!


The entire German strategy in the early war was dictated by their shortage of raw materials. In the early period of the war, Hitler was actually making quite lucid decisions. He recognized he had nothing to gain by waiting so he attacked Poland. He was only able to invade France because of the oil and other raw materials obtained from the Soviet trade agreement. They invaded Norway, not to expand the empire, but to secure iron ore deliveries from Sweden via the port of Narvik when the Baltic was frozen. The spoils from France fueled the Blitz and the Battle of Britain and ultimately Barbarossa. The Fall of France and Italy's entry into the war steered Romania towards the Axis powers which secured their oil supply. The idea of a defensive or deliberate German strategy is absurd if one understands their raw materials situation.
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falloutfan wrote:
.
**********
Germany
Primary source of oil was Romania. Austria provided some oil too, as did a treaty with the Russians.
Primary source of iron ore was Sweden. Secondary source...Norway?
Captured about 5 million barrels between France and belgium.

Russia
Primary source of Oil was the Caucasus oil fields. (Grozny, Baku, Maikop)
Primary source of iron ore.....What is now known as the Ukraine?

Britain
Iron from the Midland quarries.
Oil from South America, the USA, and from British possessions in the South Pacific?



I've got some pretty comprehensive data at this point. Germany's oil imports were almost exclusively from Romania. There were some minor contributions from Hungary, Austria, Poland etc but not significant unless your game is dealing with a very detailed and granular scale. Domestic sources of oil were pretty much of the synthetic variety - the infamous IG Farben paved the way.

Germany did have some domestic sources of mostly low grade iron ore but imports represented 60% of their supply and 86% of these imports were from Sweden. Finland, France, and Belgium all were rich in iron ore but there are so many other factors involved in steel production. It's interesting that Swedish iron ore wasn't actually as important to Germany as history books make it out to be. It was VERY important for the first year of the war, but after the fall of France and Belgium, Germany really had all the iron ore they needed in those countries.

Italy is a very interesting nation. They are entirely devoid of any significant iron ore or oil resources in their homeland or any of their colonies (excluding undiscovered oil in Libya). Once one realizes how starved they were for resources, it's entirely understandable why their military performance in the war was such a disappointment. No oil means their modern fleet sits in port the entire war. Also means they can't perform naval excercises to train their crews or train pilots properly. The lack of resources is probably why their automaotive industry was so underdeveloped - and hence they never produced quality AFVs in quantity.

You pretty much nailed the resources for the other powers.

 
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Mark Luta
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Well, Germany certainly could have pursued an option of continued trade with the USSR, while increasing trade with Turkey and ultimately the Arab nations who would have welcomed the help against Britain. And the Arabs of the time seemed much more receptive to Nazi ideology than, say, French Colonials who pretty quickly realized they had nothing in common with that viewpoint.

But, obviously to have WWII, we want Germany to go to war to gain the resources to go to war, so they can gain more resources to go to war more...Still, there are some intersting aspects of Germany not truly going to a war economy until early 1943, nearly a year after the USA production was under control of the WPB. With the considerations you outlined, there ought to be considerable leakage out of German finished goods in trade deals, even after the invasion of Russia these continued with Italy and Turkey to a large extent--even after the shift to the war economy in 1943, Germany still completed a trade deal with Turkey where they shipped out finished goods such as railway locomotives, trucks and machine parts, in exchange for consumer goods such as tobacco and dried fruit. This partly explains the continued German upswing in war material production during all of 1944 despite heavy Allied bombing--potential war resources which had been previously sent abroad were finally being fully utilized by then. Maybe this could be simulated through some sort of gradual increase in German production efficiency as things get more desparate (sort of abstractly accounting for both the shift from craftsmen assembly to assembly lines, and the gradual reduction of diversion of potential war materials to the civilian economy).
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markluta wrote:


I think the details here are way beyond the scope of your game, is not the point more to create 'for effect' rules which encourage players to protect, or target, certain locations? Interdiction of shipments from Sweden, halting mining operations in Hungary, or stopping oil refining in Romania, are all valid goals, I am not sure it really matters to most players exactly what they are doing there (though it would be nice to include some comments in the designer's notes for all this explanation). If you were to get into this level of production detail, it would seem equally important to give Britain choices such as whether to use convoys or not (shipping losses are generally higher without convoys, but convoys take longer to assemble and leave port, and must proceed at the speed of the slowest ship, so it is often possible to deliver more tons of cargo without convoys, even when the tonnage sunk is higher--this was the exact situation on the US East Coast in early 1942, the loss of more ships to submarines still resulted in more cargo being delivered, and America was not short of material to ship by then).


If losses are tallied as a percentage of the total shipping instead of an absolute value you could simulate this. When a higher number is sent each turn (not waiting for convoy escort), the absolute losses are higher though more shipments arrive. If you send a smaller quantity of shipments, you incur fewer losses.

I don't really think it is necessary though to "balance" the interest level of each player as far as economics is concerned. The diversified resources should create exciting and compelling strategic choices for both sides. If obtaining a resource is of crucial import to one player, the denial of that resource is equally compelling to his adversary. Narvik is certainly of more interest to the UK player when it potentially cripples the German war economy. Contrast this to the typical wargame where a few IPCs, BRPs, or WERPs are virtually inconsequential in the grand scheme of things.
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markluta wrote:
Well, Germany certainly could have pursued an option of continued trade with the USSR, while increasing trade with Turkey and ultimately the Arab nations who would have welcomed the help against Britain. And the Arabs of the time seemed much more receptive to Nazi ideology than, say, French Colonials who pretty quickly realized they had nothing in common with that viewpoint.

But, obviously to have WWII, we want Germany to go to war to gain the resources to go to war, so they can gain more resources to go to war more...Still, there are some intersting aspects of Germany not truly going to a war economy until early 1943, nearly a year after the USA production was under control of the WPB. With the considerations you outlined, there ought to be considerable leakage out of German finished goods in trade deals, even after the invasion of Russia these continued with Italy and Turkey to a large extent--even after the shift to the war economy in 1943, Germany still completed a trade deal with Turkey where they shipped out finished goods such as railway locomotives, trucks and machine parts, in exchange for consumer goods such as tobacco and dried fruit. This partly explains the continued German upswing in war material production during all of 1944 despite heavy Allied bombing--potential war resources which had been previously sent abroad were finally being fully utilized by then. Maybe this could be simulated through some sort of gradual increase in German production efficiency as things get more desparate (sort of abstractly accounting for both the shift from craftsmen assembly to assembly lines, and the gradual reduction of diversion of potential war materials to the civilian economy).


Actually some of the more recent studies on this topic are dubunking the myth that Germany had a "peacetime economy during war". There is very strong evidence supporting the theory that German production was depressed because they were already preparing for a two front war as early as 1940 - a schizophrenic short war and long war plan. Armaments production for the Wehrmacht were geared towards a short-term blitzkrieg strategy in the East. Meanwhile huge capital investments were being made in aircraft industry for the inevitable showdown with the West. The critical flaws in the plan were that there was no quick resolution in the East and by the time Germany was cranking out 20000+ fighters annually by 1944, there was no oil and no trained pilots left to fly them. Albert Speer took a lot of credit for production surges that had their foundations laid in the early stages of the war. It takes years not months to develop an armaments industry.
 
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Oh my God They Banned Kenny
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m3tan wrote:
It's all about scale. Germany consists of 8 territories. Players pick a territory and roll dice. The odds of hitting the target are quite slim (1 in 6 per bomber). The results will be dubious at best until 1944 when the Allies have so many bombers that you can't miss if you're rolling 20+ dice in only 3 or 4 territories...

So to answer you question: player's DON'T really have detailed information. They have a 200x200 km area that they have to essentially carpet bomb to ensure they get the "tank production"...


Getting back to 'specific' locations for a moment - even if we consider just German fighter production, the two main 'types' from the mid-war period were the Me-109 and the FW-190. The U.S. targetted FW-190 production in Bremen and Kassel and Me-109 production in Regensburg and Austria. So fighter production alone would be spread from northern, central and southern Germany through to Austria. Basically you probably don't need or want to get into any more detail than picking a 'representative' production location for each 'type' (e.g. Bavaria being as good as any for German fighter production) based on some 'major facility'.
 
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Mark Luta
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Regardless of what 'recent studies' say, they seem rather bunk, since Germany did have trade pacts in place for consumer goods in exchange for finished machinery, which is incompatible with a war economy. And one need only look at contemporary pictures to see the differences between German production under Todt as compared with Speer. It hardly should have taken three years to accomplish this changeover, all of Britain, the USSR and the USA did it in much less time. Britain was even able to send war production to the USSR soon after the invasion, despite the toll the war was taking on them.

The USA would eventually bribe Spain, Turkey and Switzerland with oil and some finished goods to stop their war production flow to Germany (Switzerland of course essentially under duress to do so), but only after the war was well and truly swung decisively in favour of the Western Allies. Germany sending railway locomotives and trucks to Turkey while infantry units in Russia were being destroyed because of lack of transport is not a sign of a war economy!

I would imagine one could do a study to show, no Germany was not diverting 50% of their resources to the civilian economy at the start of 1943, it was really only 48%...One need only look at the timing of when nonessential businesses were ordered closed to see when the war economy started. If Germany had wanted to win the war, they would have needed 70-80% of their resources devoted to war production, as Britain and the USSR did. The USA achieved something like 60% of resources to the war effort, without even being directly threatened by conquest.

For all their image of modernity and teutonic efficiency, Germany were more like a feudal empire than a command economy. There were the Junkers in the east ruling vast estates with serfs, the Air Ministry, the SS, Organization Todt, and so on, all competing for resources for their own aims--and a leader who slept till at least noon every day, and would issue such quanities of decrees that it was nearly impossible to follow up upon most of them to determine whether instructions were being followed. And numbers were faked, silly methods were used to compute results, just as with any large organization.

Still, once again probably none of this really matters a great deal in terms of game production. Production constraints outside of what happened historically are probably unknowable, other than at the extremes--such as the argument that if France had not built the Maginot line, they could have for the same cost equipped 30 armoured divisions, true as far as it goes, but there was no way France was going to build 30 armoured divisions worth of tanks in the 1930s. So there was really no tradeoff--the production of the nations was what it was, we only try to dissect it after the fact to figure out where decisions went right (the British Cabinet overruling their air experts in the late 30s and concentrating on fighter production over bombers) and where things went wrong (Germany spending massive resources to fortify the Channel Islands on the theory these would need to be taken prior to any large-scale invasion of northern France).
 
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