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Subject: Worst outbreak ever rss

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Greg Jones
United States
Washington
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We were doing okay in the game, we were about to get out third cure, and most disease areas were under control. Then we got an epidemic and it put Europe in a really bad situation. Three cities in a row, Madrid, Paris, and Milan all had three cubes.

I was all the way over in Shanghai with 5 red cards ready to cure at our lab in Seoul. However, I recognized how dire the situation was. Only 9 blue cubes were in the supply, and an infection in any of those three cities would cause a triple chain reaction outbreak that would product ... exactly 9 cubes. Milan was in the discards, but the other two weren't. The situation was so dire that I had to use my Shanghai card, one of my 5 intended for the red cure, to fly out to Europe and clear some blue cubes. Fortunately, at least we had the blue cure. So I went to Paris and cleared it.

Good thing, because Madrid got infected. With Paris cleared, it was only a single outbreak. Bernard flew to Milan with his Milan card and cleaned it up. I had drawn a red card, and I had him (the Operations Expert) build me a lab in Paris. It seemed like we were back on track. Blue was reasonably under control, and I was ready to cure red.

Unfortunately, another epidemic came fast. It put three cubes in New York, which immediately broke out, and chain reacted with Madrid. By some stroke of luck, there was one blue cube left in the supply.

However, the first infection card after the epidemic was New York again. So it broke out and chain reacted with Madrid. Now London is adjacent to both New York and Madrid, so it already had two cubes from the two previous Madrid outbreaks and one from the first New York outbreak. So when a cube came at it from New York again, it broke out. That threw another cube at Paris, which of course already had three from Madrid. Algiers(!), not even a blue city, also had three from Madrid, and it broke out.

This game was on BSW, which provided us with an unlimited supply of extra cubes to track how bad it got. At the end of the game, there were 11 more blue cubes on the board than the whole supply. Nine cities had 3 blue cubes each, including two that aren't blue cities, Sao Paolo and Algiers. Algiers broke out, as I mentioned, which resulted in the unusual situation of a blue cube in Cairo, which is not even adjacent to any blue cities.

In hindsight, this disaster was preventable. When I went to clear Paris, I first cleared a couple cubes in Shanghai, which was also at three cubes. I could have gone to Paris first, cleared, and also gone to Madrid and cleared. That would have prevented the first Madrid outbreak, the second Madrid outbreak, and the third Madrid outbreak, which in turn caused so many others. Or of course I could have treated Shanghai and Madrid instead of Shanghai and Paris.

However, I can't find any fault with my thought process at the time. Although red was not in as bad shape as blue, I thought we would soon be bringing blue under control, and it made sense to clean up Shanghai, since I was leaving the area and might not be coming back soon. Paris seemed the best blue target to clean, not Madrid, because an outbreak in Paris would chain react to Milan. Although that would not immediately end the game, it would put it close again. If I cleared Madrid, Bernard could clear both Milan and Paris, but I thought that wouldn't be necessary after we'd put six blue cubes back in the supply.

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Greg Jones
United States
Washington
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Added screen capture.
 
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Mark Thomason
United States
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That's impressive.
 
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