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1960: The Making of the President» Forums » Rules

Subject: Debates Timing/Placement rss

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Eric Engstrom
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The rules indicate that in a round of the debates, both players play and reveal their debate cards simultaneously. The rules also indicate that if a card has both icons, the player chooses which side to play on. The rules also state that if both cards have both symbols, the player with initiative chooses who places their card first.

So, it seems to me that after players flip cards, the ones with a single symbol are immediately placed. After that, it seems that a card with both symbols is placed.

My question:

1) Does this mean that if only one player plays a card with both symbols, they have the luxury of examining the board, after their opponent's single-symbol card is marked, and deciding which side of the board it would be the best play?

2) Players who play a double symbol card do not have to declare which side it is going on until it is time for them to place it? (Either in the case of question one, or in the case where the initiative player decides the order of play.)
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Steve Duff
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I'm not really understanding your question. At the moment that both cards are revealed, both players know immediately where all single symbol cards are going to end up. There is no choice, they have to go where the card says.

So 1 is always true, even if the opponent hasn't physically placed the card yet. You know where it's going.

And 2 happens mere seconds after turning up the cards, so there is no time gap to be concerned about. You put the card where you want to.
 
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Greg Schmittgens
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The answer to both of your questions is Yes.

Theoratically, you chose the card because you had planned which side of the debate it would be played. But you actually place the card when appropriate (either after the other person has played, if there is one, or in initiative order, if there are two).
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StevenE Smooth Sailing...
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To further this question...
Why would I ever place a card on my opponents side?

This would be helping him to win that issue.
 
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Tim Gilberg
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StevenE wrote:
To further this question...
Why would I ever place a card on my opponents side?

This would be helping him to win that issue.


If you have no way of beating your opponent on that issue, based on the cards being played that round, throw it to your opponent so he gets less cubes. (Earlier debate wins are worth less influence.)
 
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Daniel Savino
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StevenE wrote:
To further this question...
Why would I ever place a card on my opponents side?

This would be helping him to win that issue.



You would place a card on your opponent's side if your campaign strategy deck has any cards with only your opponent's symbol on it. This can easily happen if you get a bad draw of cards during the activity phase and all or most of your cards have events that will benefit only your opponent. This happened to me on my first play and I was forced to play cards to my campaign strategy that would benefit my opponent. While this helped my opponent to win two debates, this was a far better outcome than had I allowed my opponent to trigger the event during the activity phase.
 
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