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Axis & Allies: Guadalcanal» Forums » Strategy

Subject: Comparing the Stats rss

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G√ľnter Immeyer
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Essen
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For those of you who like statistics, I compiled a little comparison between Japan's and the US' starting units (initial situation at game setup):

Japan
--------

air units: 8 fighters, 2 bombers
sea units: 1 battleship, 2 aircraft carriers, 4 cruisers, 4 destroyers, 2 subs, 6 transports
land units: 15 infantry, 4 artillery, 2 anti-aircraft guns
total units: 50 (10 air / 19 sea / 21 land)
total cost: 155 (34 air / 94 sea / 27 land)
supply units: 6* (value: 12)

total air attack: 33
total sea atack: 31
total land attack: 37

total attack power: 101

USA
-----

air units: 9 fighters, 5 bombers
sea units: 1 battleship, 2 aircraft carriers, 2 cruisers, 5 destroyers, 2 subs, 6 transports
land units: 8 infantry, 6 artillery, 2 anti-aircraft guns
total units: 48 (14 air / 18 sea / 16 land)
total cost: 161 (52 air / 85 sea / 24 land)
supply units: 3* (value: 6)

total air attack: 37
total sea atack: 37
total land attack: 37

total attack power: 111

* although the supply token situation looks to be largely in favor of Japan with a 6 - 3 ratio, you should realistically count it as a 4 - 5 advantage for the US, since the 2 Japanese tokens on Guadalcanal will almost certainly fall into the hands of the US in turn 1!

*********************************************************************

So what do these numbers tell us?
(my thoughts/opinion only, feel free to contradict or complement...)

1) Overall, the game is veeery well balanced, both sides seem to have almost equal possibilities, even though their unit structure slightly differs

2) The US clearly has the air sovereignty, while Japan has marginal advantages in the land and sea units (especially in the cruiser department!)

3) The US army compensates these quantitative deficits pretty well with their superior air power: especially the 5 - 2 ratio in bombers helps to toss out an impressive amount of sea and land attack power

4) Since air units are the most flexible/versatile units in this game (due to their range), the air advantage of the US even gives them a slight overall attack advantage. The US actually needs this advantage and should put it to good (and fast!) use to make up for Japan's significant territorial advantage: the potential control of 5 airfields as compared to the US' 4...

So in my eyes, if both sides play this game without committing any serious errors and make the best out of their own advantages, it should be an exciting and close call every time (assuming of course, that the infamous battle box doesn't favour one of the two sides too much...)!
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Paul Amala
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In my plays of this game, Japan always seems to be on the defensive. If the U.S. is reasonably aggressive, he will win the game (dice being averagely cooperative).
 
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Jan Ozimek
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In my experience the game is pretty well balanced. It often comes down to a coinflip in the last turn. Typically in the last round one side is forced to make a last ditch attack with the goal of either:

Damage an airstrip
Sink a capital ship

Not sure whether this is a good or a bad thing.
thumbsupIt's a sign the game is well balanced
thumbsdownIt's a sign that it's maybe too hard to really outplay you opponent

Damaging an airstrip is pretty difficult, as contingiency supply tokens are typically in place. Going after the opponent's capital ships is extremely dicey.
 
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Paul Amala
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ozimek wrote:
In my experience the game is pretty well balanced. It often comes down to a coinflip in the last turn. Typically in the last round one side is forced to make a last ditch attack with the goal of either:

Damage an airstrip
Sink a capital ship

Not sure whether this is a good or a bad thing.
thumbsupIt's a sign the game is well balanced
thumbsdownIt's a sign that it's maybe too hard to really outplay you opponent

Damaging an airstrip is pretty difficult, as contingiency supply tokens are typically in place. Going after the opponent's capital ships is extremely dicey.


Just like the real campaign, this is an infrastructure thing. As the U.S. go for the Japanese airbases and zones. This is the winning strategy.
 
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Kenneth Stein
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Years later, but....

Have you read the earlier discussion I started "Japan's 5 Airfield Strategy"? The apparent balance, without the variant tokens, is an illusion. Or try playing a longer game, say to 20 VPs.
 
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