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Subject: Zombie in my Piecepack rss

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Obviously, this is necessarily a highly abstracted adaptation, so some familiarity with the original game is required. In fact, I’ve written this in such a way that it would probably be incomprehensible to someone who hadn’t already experienced the joy of having zombies writhing around in their pockets (no doubt chewing holes so you’ll lose your car keys).

Requirements: 1 standard piecepack and a bit of imagination.

Set Up: You’ll need all of the Shield(blue) tiles, all of the Crown(green) tiles, and the Nulls and Aces from both the Suns(red) and Moons(black).
Set the Sun and Moon Nulls aside, face up; they will serve as the Foyer and Patio, respectively.
The Shield tiles will serve as the indoor rooms, with the Ace of Suns as the Evil Temple. Shuffle these together, and set them aside in a face down stack.
The Crowns will be the outdoor tiles, with the Ace of Moons as the Graveyard.

Of the unused tiles, take two and place them face down, one above the other, forming a 2x4 grid. These will serve as a sort of makeshift clock, and the black pawn (representing the minute hand) should be placed in the upper right square of the top tile.
To the right of this clock should be placed, number side up, a coin in each of these denominations: Null, 3 and 5. To the left of it should be placed a column of five Sun coins, and still further to the left should be placed a single Shield coin. This is your status chart, to keep track of your strength/weapon level (represented by shield coins), your health (the Sun coins) as well as the time.
It should look more or less like this:

After every action, the Black pawn should be moved to the next square in a clockwise direction, and each time it returns to it’s original position (a new hour), the topmost number coin next to the “clock” should be removed. If the final coin is removed before you’ve completed the mission, you lose the game. The numbers on these coins represent the intensity of the zombie outbreak, as the size of their horde increases. The active number (the topmost one) will be added to the die rolls during zombie attacks (see below), for a potential of ten brain-eaters coming after you at once! But you’ll be ready if it ever comes to that… hopefully…zombie

Each turn, you will either place and enter a new tile (the Sun Pawn can be used to keep track of what room you're currently in) or return to a previous room. Either way, the following actions should always be taken:
1.Move the clock ahead one square.
2.Roll three dice – the Sun, Moon, and the Shield. The highest number decides what happens that turn:
If the highest number is a Sun, you find food and should add an additional health coin to your status meter (maximum of six).
If the highest number is a Shield, you find some sort of weapon or armor, and should add an attack coin to your status meter (maximum of six).
If the highest number is a Moon, the number of zombies on the die are added to the current zombie intensity number (located next to the clock), and that many zombies attacks you. The damage they inflict is the difference between your attack power and the number of zombies. As usual, you can retreat to an already visited room if you get overwhelmed, but are deducted a health coin.
If the die roll result in a tie, the Moon/zombies take precedent. If the tie is between the Sun and Shield, nothing happens. Damn.

3. (optional)Before moving on to the next room, you can opt to cower, in the hopes of regaining a health coin. It’s not a sure thing this time though. You have to roll the Sun die, and if the number is greater than your current health level, you add (just) one coin to your health. Time still passes while you cower, so don’t forget to move the clock another notch.
4.Some rooms have additional options. See the section on special rooms below.

With a couple exceptions, the number on the room tiles represents the number of doorways in that room, therefore only that many rooms may be directly connected to them. The Sun Pawn can be used to keep track of what room you are currently in. If you find yourself in a situation where there’s nowhere to go, zombies can break through a wall and create a passageway. The Moon die (only) should be rolled, and you’re attacked by that many zombies (still added to the intensity meter). If you get lucky, you’ll roll a Null, logic be damned.

A little imagination is required for the special rooms:
•I’ve already mentioned that the Null Sun and Moon are, respectively, the Foyer and Patio.
•I believe I also said that the Aces of Sun and Moons are the Evil Temple and Graveyard (again, respectively). The rules for these rooms are pretty much exactly the same as in the Original game. You have to take two turns to find and eventually bury the totem (don’t forget to move the clock twice). Technically, the Evil Temple should have two doorways, though I usually play as if it only has one (since it uses an Ace).
•The other Aces represent rooms where you can pick up a free health point, so long as you don’t get chased off by zombies. As long as you end your turn in these rooms, you get the bonus, with no need to roll any extra dice. Health rooms, being Aces, only have one doorway.
•The other Nulls represent storage rooms, where you have the option to try and find weapons to increase your attack power. It’s not a sure thing though, and it requires you to move the clock one space. To search, just roll the Shield die (only). If the number rolled is greater than your current attack power, you can add one coin to it. Storage rooms only have a single doorway.
•The indoor Five represents the Dining Room. It has four doorways, one of which leads to the Patio. It’s the only way to get outside. (To slightly increase the difficulty, you can deduct one health point as you smash through the glass patio door).
•The outdoor Five doesn’t represent anything in particular. It’s basically the same as the four; tiles can be laid on any side of it.

Here's an example of what a finished game might look like:


So that’s basically it. Hope I haven’t overlooked anything. I don’t think you could fit a Piecepack in your pocket, but at least now you don’t have to hang yourself if you forget to bring your copy of ZIMP on your week long backpacking trip. Now, if you forgot your Piecepack, hang away. Don’t tell me you forgot rope too?

Special thanks to Jeremiah, for making ZimP in the first place, and for allowing me to post this variant.
Also, if anybody was wondering, I'm using the Color JCD Piecepack, from Blue Panther. I'm not an expert on piecepacks, but I'm very pleased with this set, as well as the fast service at BP.
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Jeremiah Lee
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Way cool. It's funny, because I look at the image, and I see ZimP. There's something about the layout of tiles that just looks like the game, even though it's not the game.

Thanks for putting this together.
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Peter Cobcroft
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Very cool.
However, the components for ZiMP are really what makes the game for me.
Large amounts of looking up what something means in a Piecepack game kind of deny the strengths of what it's for.
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Thanks, guys.

Peter, I definitely share your sentiments. I might have overdid it a bit with the specificity of some of the rules. My aim was for the variant to be "whole" and "complete" (partially for my own future reference), but it really isn't necessary to follow these directions too precisely. It's certainly not important, for example, that X tile represent X room, because the game would still function as long as you can remember the original ZimP squares (which tend to burn themselves into the brain), and decide for yourself which tiles represent which rooms. If anything should be memorized, it's the system I set up for tracking time and increasing the sizes of zombie attacks. That part took some figuring out.

As far as the components adding to the atmosphere, I certainly can't deny that, but perhaps you aren't giving yourself enough credit. The same part of your brain that makes the unseen zombies come to life in the original game can go a long way toward making a bunch of generic numbered tiles into a spooky house and yard.
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Bill
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I think it's clever. A nice variation of an exsisting game, utilizing pieces I wouldn't have thought to us and it allows me to play at work with no one being the wiser. *insert evil laugh*
 
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RanDomino Nickelmaster
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I'm in yr piecepack. Eatin' yr brains.
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