Recommend
31 
 Thumb up
 Hide
9 Posts

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Gaming Related » Do It Yourself

Subject: Made my own pitchcar Mini cars rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: diy [+] make [+] [View All]
Tim Collins
United States
San Rafael
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Hey there... one of the frequent complaints I here about Pitchcar mini is that the cars are too light and fly off the track to easily. I enjoy the game and have adapted to flicking lighter but I just feel it is a bit more fun to use some more power, and not have to worry about a rocket luanched car every time. So I made these Pitch Cars: The Xr-94 MkI laugh



They are made out of Fimo and each has a penny imbeded within to add some extra weight. The stickers were photo edited, color matched, printed and laminated. here is a comparison to the original



They hav a very nice feel to them and I think they look way more fun than the original cars.They were shaped from a press mold that I had made from Green Stuff and 2 plastic coke bottle caps.



here's an action shot



Green went up on the rail and blue is in trouble!

I had a great time making them. let me know what you think!

Tim
18 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Nicolas Larson
United States
Utah
flag msg tools

Hey, these are pretty cool! You should keep making things like this, if you lose a piece of a game you could just make it.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Craig Blumer
United States
Oshkosh
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Are the cars actually sliding on the penny? Fimo seems like it would have much less glide than wood. So I guess what I'm asking is how is the glide and did you do anything to make it better?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tim Collins
United States
San Rafael
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
No the penny is inside. Also I finished the bottom by sanding it with 250 then 400 then 800 grit sand paper, so it glides very well actually. the surface is actually much smoother than the wood.I put effort into the smoothness of the botton surface to make up for the additional weight. I also adjusted the bottom by creating a larger bevel around the edges in order to have it travel over edges in the track with less likelyhood of being popped up . all in all they travel farther, get popped up less and glide over track edges much better. I am really pleased. thanks for the question. I am working on a new mold to make the final product as even as I can so I have to do less sanding.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ian McCarthy
United States
Milwaukee
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Unicorniclops wrote:
No the penny is inside. Also I finished the bottom by sanding it with 250 then 400 then 800 grit sand paper, so it glides very well actually. the surface is actuall much smoother than the wood which i wanted to do to make up for the additional weight. I also adjusted the bottom by creating a larger bevel around the edges in order to have it travel over seems in the track with less likelyhood of being popped up. all in all they travel farther, get popped up less and hit the seems better. I really pleased. thanks for the question. I am working on a new mold to make the final product as even as I can so I have to do less sanding.


This seems totally amazing. I have heard about green stuff several times now and all the things you can do with it. I'm anxious to try some of the "stuff" myself. I own Pitchcar mini and you've nearly convinced me to try to duplicate your efforts. I have a lot on my plate right now concerning DIY/customization stuff, so it'll be awhile before I decide whether to follow through on this tantalizing option.

Thanks.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tim Collins
United States
San Rafael
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Its really quite fun to do. The longest part of the process is sanding which isnt that long. However, being that that was my first attempt at making a press mold i learned a bit along the way. SO I'm making a second as we speak in order to get a cleaner finish and reduce sanding time. finally, when you do your sanding with the 800 grit sand paper, you are wet sanding to get a nice smooth polished surface. plus you have to use a release agent on the mold... you know, give me a few hours and I'll make up a step by step you or anyone else who was interested could follow.

thanks for the input.

Tim
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tim Collins
United States
San Rafael
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Well, I just finished the mold for Xr-94 MK II (the second mold ) and the car came out perfect. still had to sand, but not nearly as much. I am much more pleased with the second mold and may end up remaking the entire set. I cant stress enough how much difference the extra weight of the dime (the penny didnt work out and it was too wide, ill change that) and the smoother bevel keeps these bad boys on the track. Also, the nice shiny custom made sticker looks much better than the original IMO. I figured any owner of pitchcar mini (or regular Pitchcar) may have interest in this project so I posted a simple 'how to' in case folks wanted to do it themselves. All techniques used here will work equally well for Pitchcar and Pitchcar mini. (though with pitchcar you may need something bigger than a plastic coke bottle cap as your mold shell.

I figured if anyone else wanted to do the same, I'd post this little 'how to' that shows how I got the best results.

1. The Mold
The mold is made out of Green Stuff, which you will find in probably any hobby/game shop. It is an epoxy putty that comes in 2 parts. once the parts are mixed together they make a green putty that will hardenover 1-4 hours. It can be expensive, so in order to save on space inside each shell, I placed pennies as a filler inside the bottle cap t. After doing this, there was a minimal space left yet I had all I needed for the car to fit.

The mold is made in 2 different parts, one after the other. So, take your first shell and put in pennies or whatever or no filler depending on what you have. Then mix up some green stuff and fill up the cap so the green stuff is flush wth the brim of the cap. To make green stuff easier to work withand less prone to stick to you fingers, you keep your fingers wet with water. Now you are almost ready to place your pitchcar in the this half of the mold. HOWEVER, before you do, give the car a thin gloss of vaseline or the green stuff will stick to your car and you'll have a mess on your hands!

Now you can press your car half way down into the mold. Press easily because if you overshoot, you'll have bad results and mayhave to start over. You'll notice that as the car sinks in, the edge of the green stuff kind of slopes down around the car. You'll want to fix this my gently pushing the green stuff up agsint the side of the car to make a flush fit all the way around. Do not remove the car until the greenstuff is dry otherwise, you'll create distortions in your mold. Once this is done, it helps to make a round indention on either side of the car in the green stuff that will act as a key of sorts to make sure you have proper alignment when you press your fimo.

Notice the indentions I made in this mold and the other side has knobs that fit into them. The mold you make will look much better than this one as I didnt take my time with the mold construction the first time around.(I wasnt sure it was going to work so this mold was an expiriment) regardless, yours should look nicer.
Once the Green Stuff is hard it will stay semi-plyable which is great cause it will help you get the cast out later. Now you can remove your car from the mold to see how it turned out. It wont want to come out by itself, so it's going to need some coaxing. you can gently squeeze on the sides of the bottle cap with pliers to loosen it up a bit. An extacto knife carefully inserted between the car and green stuff can also help you wedge it out. With the car out you can take a look at your mold to make sure you are satisfied before you build the other half. Don't worry if the bottom surface isnt perfectly smooth, you'll be sanding the casts down afterward.
Once again glaze the car with a thin coat of vaseline and replace it into the mold half. Also, put vaseline on the entire casting surface of your first mold half to prevent the second from sticking together. Make up the next half of the mold the way you did the first half. Once ready, press the halves together easily at first. as it is displaced, green stuff will flop out the edges of the mold. Make sure to gently press it inward to assure a decent edge on the car. Now, I kept my mold under even, firm pressure in a C-vice the second time around, but you can just place some weight on top of it as well. Let it sit till the second shell is hard.
Once dry youll have to pry the shell apart and take out the car. Be patient, you'll get it. now your mold is done! take the time to mark on the outside a cut or line on 2 sides of the mold so you can line it up my sight easily.


2. The Fimo
Now your car is ready to be cast. however, you need to prep each side of the mold before you do. do this by applying cornstarch as a release agent on the mold. Use a make-up or paint brush to tap some corstarch on the the mold half. tap off the excess. work a small ball of fimo till it is soft and ready to press. fill one half of the disk mold with fimo making sure to press it into the corners. Now, place the dime in the middle of the fimo and press down gently with even pressure until the dime is slightly embeded in the fimo. Now put corn starch on the other half and fill it with fimo. press the 2 sides together using firm pressure, but dont go godzilla on this thing or it will distort and not turn out right. pull the 2 shells apart gently and directly away from one another with only a subtle rocking motion if any. your fimo car will be stuck in one side. Use an exacto knife to cut away excess overflow of fimo. you dont have to be precice here, just a general cutaway. Use a pair of pliers to gently squeeze the outside of the mold, twist the mold and repeat. Try to tap the fimo out into your hand. Be patient here if you coated your mold it will come out. Now that you have your new car cast out, check to see how well lined up the upper and lower halves are. I have found that on the first cast of a disk, the upper and lower halves are not perfectly lined up since its difficult to apply perfect pressure. No problem! just make sure you have restarched your mold and put the disk back in. now press using less pressure than before and you should get good results. Down worry about the mold lines or corn starch on the car, those will be sanded off later.

3. BAKE!
235 F* for 30 minutes. Take the cars out of the oven and let cool before sanding; at least an hour.

4. Sanding
you will need at least 240 grit and 800 grit sand paper. I like to also use 400 grit cuase you will end up with a smoother finish. sand off the mold lines and sand the flat sides as flat as you can. Its very easy to sand in flat spots (i did it a couple of times at the start) if you are pressing too hard while sanding. if you do not to worry, it can be fixed with more sanding, it just takes more time. now snd on the edge of once side creating a bevel. this will be the cars sliding surface. The amount of bevel you create is really up to you. once all the imperfections are out and your bevel is created, you can start with the 800 grit sand paper which will give you a VERY smooth finish. 800 grit paper is used in a wet sanding technique. either sand while in a basin/bowl of water or under a slight trickle at the sink. As long as the sanding surfaces remain wet you are fine. Apply only gentle pressure here. dry and buff with a cotton cloth like a tshirt and ta-da!! your disk is done!

5. The Sticker
I took a great image that I found on the net by artist Adrian Bruce. I edited it to remove the number, and created a version of this matched to each color of fimo I was using. I then put the gradient of the same color behind it and shrunk each individual circle image down to (20mm) pasted them all into a single image and printed it out on avery full sheet label paper (available at any office supply store.) I then laminated the stickers beore I punched them out using adhesive lamination film (most likely available at that same office supply store) finally I punched them out using a 3/4 (19mm) hole punch found at michaels and probably available at other craft stores as well. If you arent good at gimp or photoshop and wanted the specific images I used, email/msg me and I'll see what I can do. also, if you have questions about the project or any brand names of anything I used msg me and I'll let ya know. otherwise any feedback or questions you post here would be appreciated!

Thanks!

Tim
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ian McCarthy
United States
Milwaukee
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Casting is so cool! I did some pewter casting in high school and then a bronze cast in college and it's always magic to see the finished product.

Thanks so much for this guide. I'm glad I didn't give this a try before you posted the how-to. I would've fouled it up and probably made a mess of one of the cars to boot. Your advice about making an indentation on the inside and then a cut on the outside to aid in lining the thing up is particularly helpful. Thanks so much for taking the time to write it up and post it all in the first place.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tim Collins
United States
San Rafael
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
yeah it was fun to do. Be sure to post a pic when you are done!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.