Recommend
61 
 Thumb up
 Hide
5 Posts

Qwirkle Cubes» Forums » Reviews

Subject: Review and Comparison to It's Parent, Qwirkle rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Daniel Chen
United States
Green Bay
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
designer
This looks tasty...
badge
Yuck!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Qwirkle Cubes appeared on my radar a few weeks ago. It is a modified version of the Mindware game, Qwirkle. After stopping into a math and learning store, my wife (who LOVES Qwirkle) picked up the cute little box and 'allowed' me to buy it. We both like Qwirkle quite a bit.


Aesthetics and Components

The box is much smaller than the original Qwirkle box. You can see the box size comparison in Boomer's picture as well as size comparison between tiles vs dice:



The game as a whole is a lot lighter in terms of physical weight (I always found Qwirkle a bit too heavy and cumbersome).

The cubes are made of wood (I personally would have preferred more durable dice, bakelite anyone?) The vibrant colors and fun shapes are the same between the two games. Each cube has all six shapes of a single color. They are pretty small, so I might be worried that they could be a choking hazard with young children (or in our case, our canine offspring).

Also included with Qwirkle Cubes is a drawstring draw bag that is a bit smaller but perfect size for the game.

The rules, contained in a small square rulebook, were relatively clear and concise.

Game Play

The placement and scoring remains unchanged from the original Qwirkle. Each player can only place a die provided A) it is played on a line matching the lines' color or shape and B) there is not an identical die already on that line.

Like Scrabble, players scores a point for all die of new and extended lines. There is also a qwirkle bonus if a player completes a line consisting of the six different shapes of a single color or a six different colors of a single shape.

The twist to Qwirkle cubes is that a player rolls (or re-rolls) however many of their 6 cubes as they wish, plays as many as desire/can and replenishes up to 6 dice at the end of their turn. Because a die contain only one color and the dice are visible to all players, this adds a bit of interaction, anticipation, and strategy that is not available in the original Qwirkle where tiles are kept hidden. Also, there is a greater amount of strategy involved in selecting which dice to roll at the start of a turn.

Of course, the rolling of the dice adds some luck factor to the game, but I don't think it is any MORE chaos than drawing tiles. The only difference is that in the original game, you can deduce how many of a given color shape combination were left, whereas in Qwirkle Cubes, there is a degree of freedom present. For example, in the original Qwirkle, sometimes you could extend a line to 5 tiles safely knowing that there are no more tiles that could complete a qwirkle for that line. In Qwirkle Cubes, you couldn't necessarily know until the final couple of turns if you could safely add to lines of dice of the same color.

Changes I'd Make

It might make rolling decisions a bit harder to make, but I'd have half the dice with sides displaying all the same color, but add dice that had sides displaying all the same shapes (Qwirkle Cubes 2). This would add another layer of depth.


Final Thoughts

I enjoyed playing Qwirkle Cubes a bit more than Qwirkle. I think there's a bit more strategy and depth, with some added randomness to the game that makes it an improvement over the original. I also liked it much more than another similar abstract cube laying game, Set Cubed.

If you like pattern detection abstract games like SET, I think you should give Qwirkle Cubes a try. The game is also compact and light enough that I consider it a travel game.

Avoid it if you don't like luck, abstracts (no theme), or are colorblind.
25 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dave Lartigue
United States
Springfield
Massachusetts
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
You mention the vibrant colors of the original, and my one complaint about that game is that the colors AREN'T very vibrant, with it being very difficult to tell the difference between some of them (especially if the tiles are standing up to conceal them).

Are the colors on the cubes more distinct? I imagine that having one side always face up mitigates the problem somewhat.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Daniel Chen
United States
Green Bay
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
designer
This looks tasty...
badge
Yuck!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The colors are the same shade, but since you have multiple sides, and one presumably face up, it's likely less of a problem.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tony Allen
United States
Grand Prairie
Texas
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Legomancer wrote:
You mention the vibrant colors of the original, and my one complaint about that game is that the colors AREN'T very vibrant, with it being very difficult to tell the difference between some of them (especially if the tiles are standing up to conceal them).

Are the colors on the cubes more distinct? I imagine that having one side always face up mitigates the problem somewhat.


I also had the same problem with the colors that were either faded or inconsistent. It seems some printing miscues dominated the original batch of games that later on were sorted out. It didn't matter to me too much because I was underwhelmed by the game and traded it. But now this new version might interest me more. What to do?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
William (Andy) Anderson
United States
Las Vegas
Nevada
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks for the review. I loved the orginal and this new version is even better. The cubes are very well made and I bought 4 copies and all the extra copies have sold to friends who just had to have a copy. Lots of fun with two players and this games is enjoyable with children and adults through their 80s.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.