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Glory to Rome» Forums » Sessions

Subject: Singing in the Choir for the Glory of Rome rss

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Tucson
Arizona
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I volunteered to do some singing for my church choir with practices that just so happen to be on Thursday nights, which, to drag this sentence on even longer, coincides with weekly game night, alas. But singing's cool and I was still able to get in on the last half hour of gaming. Half an hour is perfect for playing a game of Glory to Rome!

Glory to Rome gets played a lot in these parts, and we don't use no "top secret" rules for weaklings. If you want to give glory to Rome in Tucson, you have to do it the old fashioned way.

John, Ryan and Reed had just finished a game of Glory to Rome when I showed up. Ryan, despite a disturbing predilection toward not much liking to play the game, had just won by forcing it to end with a Catacomb. This brilliant move allowed him to both win the game and end it early. Nevertheless we still managed to bully Ryan into one more game.

The Pool was seeded with a Craftsman, Merchant, Laborer and, last and totally least, a Patron. John started as the first player and I as the last. Everyone but me followed John's Patron lead. I was sure there'd be nothing left to pick up but the Patron when it got around to me. Who wants a Patron Client on the first turn of the game? John picked up the Craftsman, though he was very much tempted by the Merchant. Merchants make such wonderful Clients that we rarely put one in the Pool on purpose.

Ryan was next to go and chose ... the Patron? We all laughed at his irrational experimentation. Reed hurriedly snatched up the Merchant before Ryan could think twice about his pick. I, having not followed, stared wistfully at the neglected Laborer.

Now that John had the only Craftsman Client, no one else was going to be caught dead leading such an action. So out come Laborers, Legionaries and Architects; we all get a building or three underway. I started with a hand full of Purple cards and commenced building a lovely Temple...

[I love Temples. The +4 hand size makes it easy to Petition, churn through the draw pile for just the right cards and provide plenty of resources for Craftsman Clients. Anyway, back to the game]

...and the game switches into high gear.

I have a Marble in my Stockpile and two Marble in my hand when Reed, the guy to my right, plays a Legionary. I decide to Think for a Jack despite a Legionary in my hand since Reed hasn't started any Marble buildings. Reed, because he's evil, petty and smart enough to know that I probably have a valuable chunk of Marble in my hand claims that, "Rome demands Marble!" The which Marble I am obliged give him. Nor have I any recourse since I chose not to follow.

The first player card comes to me and I lead my Legionary, use my one remaining Marble to steal Reed's Marble. Turnabout is sweet, but I'm wasting turns trying to guarantee I'll have the resources to build my precious Temple.

Some Craftsmen and Architects end up in the Pool, but everyone's having trouble finishing their first buildings. Reed's Merchant and Ryan's Patron (laugh) are dead weight this early in the game as both are focused on getting buildings completed. I manage to get both a Craftsman and an Architect in my Clientele and quickly complete my Temple. John, meanwhile, has jumped out to an early lead on the building race with his first turn Craftsman Client.

With my newly increased influence I grab a couple of Legionary Clients and another Craftsman. The Legionaries are giving John, to my left, and Reed, to my right, some serious heart burn. Both halt other projects in order to get Palisades and Walls a-building. While my neighboring opponents are in panic mode I lay the foundation of a Catacomb.

My Craftsman and Architect Clients combined with my hand size give me the freedom to build just about what ever I want, but Ryan (who had recently picked up a Merchant Client) is slowly catching up to me in building points and a few Merchant actions will put him well ahead of me. Now that he's acquired a few more Influence, his Patron isn't slowing him down so much.

Reed, desperate to get a building completed, leads Craftsman. I have a Craftsman in my hand, two in my Clientele, three Stone in my hand and seven Influence. Ryan currently has eight. I follow Reed's lead, complete my Catacomb and end the game with ten points for the win. Reed and John bow their heads having been twice foiled in a single night by the Catacomb.

No one took a Merchant action the whole game. And despite never making use of those terrifying Legionary Clients they sure helped me out. Huzzah!
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Tim Seitz
United States
Glen Allen
VA
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Like water spilled on the ground, which cannot be recovered, so we must die. But God does not take away life; instead, he devises ways so that a banished person may not remain estranged from him. 2 Sam 14:14
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And to think a single merchant action could have won the game for someone else.
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I was on pins and needles hoping Ryan would focus on finishing a building or two rather than cranking Merchants actions.

The game only lasted about 15-20 minutes and no one was expecting it to end so soon.
 
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Alex G

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In your experience, how often (other than forum wins) do merchant actions not end up the decisive factor in a game? Even here, if I'm reading right, it could have shifted the balance, right?
 
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