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Subject: HMMM rss

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rob taylor
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All I have to say at this point is that it looks like a cross between space dealer and agricola,which is not really a bad thing is it?
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Julian Steindorfer
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i don´t know space dealer ,but i know agricola quiet good.
i is a very interesting game which shares pretty less with agricola ,the only things i could recall,beside author and graphic designer ,are the harvest mechanic ,seed one and get many and that there will be a huge amount of wood! lovely wood :) !
it´s a great game (it was developed before agricola and tested the whole time until now) and it plays really different to agricola and le havre.
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Craig Phillips
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Haven't played Space Dealer, but it sounded to me like a mix of Agricola and the planting and selling of Bohnanza
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Geo
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I don't expect any new mechanics... and to be honest how many building/resource management games we have yet to buy before something new and original comes out?

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Julian Steindorfer
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GeoMan wrote:
I don't expect any new mechanics... and to be honest how many building/resource management games we have yet to buy before something new and original comes out?



i am not sure if it´s a new mechanic ,but the card distribution phase (don´t know the real name) is quiet interesting and very challenging/brain burning.
and there is also the nice idea to speed up the gameplay in a four player game.

edit: p.s who needs new mechanics when you get a big stack of wooden vegetables
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Corin A. Friesen
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GeoMan wrote:
I don't expect any new mechanics... and to be honest how many building/resource management games we have yet to buy before something new and original comes out?


There is a cool card drafting system, as Julian pointed out. I think it is new.

Otherwise, it just looks really well put together.
 
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Alan Goodrich
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Ambrose wrote:
GeoMan wrote:
I don't expect any new mechanics... and to be honest how many building/resource management games we have yet to buy before something new and original comes out?


There is a cool card drafting system, as Julian pointed out. I think it is new.

Otherwise, it just looks really well put together.


I was skeptical about Le Havre before it came out, as I guess I generally am of "refined" versus "new" mechanics - but then Le Havre arrived, and blew me away. So I'm giving Uwe the benefit of the doubt from now on, and will happily buy his next 3 games.
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Grzegorz Kobiela
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As Julian already pointed out, the card drafting mechanism and the way the 4-player game is played are completely new mechanics. There are, of course, some well-known ones:

- Sowing works exactly like in Agricola. In fact, it was the Loyang mechanism that Uwe has implemented in Agricola. (Remember: Loyang was his first idea, then he got Agricola and worked on this one first.)

- Purchase of goods is much more expensive than their re-sale (e. g. Wealth of Nations), but in sets they give you more a little profit (e. g. Le Havre).

And, finally, there is one that I currently can't think any game of where I might have seen a similar mechanic:

- Victory points must be purchased and they become more expensive the later you buy them.

This is also new, I'd say.

Anyway, regardless how much new mechanics there are or not, the game is really worth playing and very tough. Who thinks Agricola and Le Havre are easy, should try Loyang.
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Matt Davis
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Ponton wrote:
And, finally, there is one that I currently can't think any game of where I might have seen a similar mechanic:

- Victory points must be purchased and they become more expensive the later you buy them.

This is also new, I'd say.


For the record, Tinners' Trail uses this mechanic. I'd imagine there are other games where it occurs, even if it's a bit obscured by the mechanics. In the Year of the Dragon comes to mind, where the later you buy a privilege, the fewer points it's worth, although the cost stays the same, so that the cost per VP goes up as the game progresses. Privileges aren't the only way to get points there, so it's not a great example.

Not that I'm opposed to "recycled" mechanics. It's like cooking. Combining old ingredients in new and exciting ways can be just as exciting as eating something you've never had before. And for that matter, it can be safer as you know there will be something in the dish you like.
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Grzegorz Kobiela
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I don't know both games. I was aware that there might be games that also have this victory points purchase mechanics. However, the two you mention are newer ones and most probably, the designers had the same idea all at the same time. Loyang also dates back to 2004 or 2005, so it falls into the same category of parallel developments.
 
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Brett Hudoba
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geschichte wrote:
Haven't played Space Dealer, but it sounded to me like a mix of Agricola and the planting and selling of Bohnanza

Exactly my first reaction, but I'm curious nonetheless.
 
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Scott O'Brien
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sounds like a cross between agricola and jambo ...
definately should be fun.

so... is it ready yet whistle

how bout now?
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jbrier
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Just read the rules, and I have to say I agree that both the card drafting mechanism and the purchase of victory points mechanism are novel and very clever.

Whereas in "Tinner's Trail" the diminishing return from buying VPs in later rounds is handled very bluntly, the way in which it is implemented in Loyang is more subtle and VERY clever. Definitely one of those "wish I would have thought of that" ideas.

I completely agree: Loyang is most similar to Jambo, which is great cause I like the fundamentals of Jambo but wish it was more multi-faceted. Looks like my wishes have been answered.
 
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Mario Aguila
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Ponton wrote:

And, finally, there is one that I currently can't think any game of where I might have seen a similar mechanic:
- Victory points must be purchased and they become more expensive the later you buy them.
This is also new, I'd say.


In Carson City, http://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/39938, a new game for Essen 2009, there is a similar mechanism.There are 4 rounds in the game.
First round $2 each VP
Second, $3 each VP
Third,$4 each VP
Fourth, $5 each VP
Rules: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/file/download/4hy15178b3/CARSON...
 
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Corin A. Friesen
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marioaguila wrote:
Ponton wrote:

And, finally, there is one that I currently can't think any game of where I might have seen a similar mechanic:
- Victory points must be purchased and they become more expensive the later you buy them.
This is also new, I'd say.


In Carson City, http://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/39938, a new game for Essen 2009, there is a similar mechanism.There are 4 rounds in the game.
First round $2 each VP
Second, $3 each VP
Third,$4 each VP
Fourth, $5 each VP
Rules: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/file/download/4hy15178b3/CARSON...

Not the same. At all. Rules: http://www.hallgames.de/download/loyang_en_regeln.zip
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Tim Seitz
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Like water spilled on the ground, which cannot be recovered, so we must die. But God does not take away life; instead, he devises ways so that a banished person may not remain estranged from him. 2 Sam 14:14
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coolpapa wrote:
... In the Year of the Dragon comes to mind, where the later you buy a privilege, the fewer points it's worth, although the cost stays the same, so that the cost per VP goes up as the game progresses. Privileges aren't the only way to get points there, so it's not a great example.

That's not the same thing AT ALL.

In Loyang, additional points cost more and more as the game progresses.

In YotD, the cost is the same but the points are less, because there is less time to earn a return. This is very common. It's true for any game where you can "buy" a fixed VP income stream. In the case for YotD, no amount of money can increase the amount of VPs earned for the investment since you can only max out at the double privilege.


 
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