Recommend
14 
 Thumb up
 Hide
11 Posts

Le Havre» Forums » Sessions

Subject: 7 Steel Gets Converted to 56 Francs on the Shipping Line on the Final Action rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Norbert Chan
Canada
Calgary
Alberta
flag msg tools
badge
Wow, so this is what you get for 100 pieces of gold.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Don had bought Le Havre from the Sentry Box for $90, and we were anxious to try this game since we had heard good things about the game.

Brief description of play: In La Havre, France, one is accumulating goods and livestock to earn Francs. There are a fixed number of rounds, and 7 turns per round. (In a three player game, there are 18 rounds). On a player's turn, they either collect goods, build, or go into a building to take that action. Optionally, they may purchase buidings, if they wish to do so. Buildings are seeded in three columns, and you can only buy the lowest numbered building in a column first, before being able to get at the rest of the buildings. At the end of each round, one has to pay food or Francs, and there may be a harvest where players may gain a maximum of one grain (from one grain) and one cattle (from two cattle). Food requirements can be reduced by owning ships.

Like Caylus, if you use someone else's building you have to pay them a fee. A small number of special buildings are randomly mixed in to make each game different.

This session was from our second game. Player order was Don, Jean and myself. The wharves (to build ships) were fairly stacked up in the middle in the build columns, so I thought I would buy a wooden ship for 14 Francs. Unfortunately, to get the money, I had to either get the joinery in play (convert 1/2/3 wood to 5/6/7 Francs) at a cost of 3 wood. But Don built the joinery first, so I paid him a Franc to use the Joinery one time, and a food another time to get my 14 Francs. I wasn't able to do the purchase until round 5.

In the meantime, the first couple of rounds, I was paying 2 Francs for my harvest. Jean and Don decided to try taking loans. I'm not sure I like the idea of taking loans. Jean's thinking was that he could land on the courthouse (return 1 or 2 loans and earn Francs) to get rid of the loans. To me, it seemed inefficent to spend a valuable action to use the courthouse. But I was close to taking a loan, since by round 3, I was down to 1 Franc, but landed on the fish supply to get my food until I could purchase my wooden ship.

I was able to get the second wooden ship, building it the traditional way, uisng 5 wood and 3 energy on Jean's wharf.

Iron was tight in this game. It only piled up to a maximum of 2 iron before if was quickly snapped up. I got two iron fairly late, and converted it into steel via the steel mill (convert iron into steel at a cost of 5 energy) which I had bought for 4 brick and 2 iron. The steel mill is quite a valuable card at 22 victory points and kept me close to Don, who had built a large number of buildings (eventually building 12 buildings to my 6 buildings). Of course to get the energy, I had to use the Colliery (get 3/4 coal if you have at least one trades building), then use the Cokery (convert coal to coke and gain a 1/2 Franc for each coal) to get coke, which is worth 10 energy. So it is quite an involved process to try to convert iron to steel, which lets you buy the luxury liners or steel ships.

So I thought I would be a little more efficient (just like the build room action in Agricola: instead of building just one wooden room with 5 wood and 2 reed, if you had 10 wood and 4 reed, you can save yourself an action by landing on this square only once, instead of doing two separate builds). So I thought I would collect all the iron at once before trying to convert to steel. So I landed on Ironworks (get 3 Iron and a 4th iron for 6 energy) twice to get 6 iron. But the game was running out of time now. On round 18, I was going first and only had 3 actions, with 4 coal and 1 wood. For my first action, I landed on the Cokery to get 4 coke (and 40 energy). I then converted the 6 iron to 6 steel using up 30 of the energy. That left me with 11 energy (10 +1). In this game you do not get change for spending energy. I was hoping to buy a luxury ship (worth 34 VPs) and use the shipping line (ship goods for Francs) the 3 steel for another 24 pts, and earn a few more for the extra cattle I had lying around (2 VPs per cattle). But I needed 3 energy for the luxury liner and would get no change if I handed in my 10 energy coke, and not have enough energy to ship (3 energy per ship is required). After thinking a bit, for my last action, I landed on Jean's Business Office (convert any 4 goods to get a steel and convert 1 good to get brick/charcoal/leather) to get 1 steel and 1 charcoal (worth 3 energy).

For our final action of the game, Don used his Bridge over the River Seine. Jean and I went into the Shipping Line. I had 4 ships: 3 wooden ships and 1 steel ship. On the Shipping Line, the wooden ships let you ship 2 goods, the steel ship lets you ship 4 goods. The cost is 3 energy per ship. So I sent all my ships for 12 energy, loading in 7 steel and 3 cattle, good for 62 pts (steel ships for 8 Francs each, cattle ships for 2 Francs each). I wasn't sure that was going to be enought, since Don had built the Town Hall, and Bank in previous turns.

Scores:

Norbert 180 (78 points from 6 buidings, including Ironworks, Steel Mill, Colliery, Cokery, Fishery and Smokehouse; 74 Francs, and 28 points from four ships)

Don 162 (106 points from 12 buildings, including Bridge Over the River Seine, Town Hall, Bank, 16 bonus points from Town Hall, 5 bonus points for the bank; 31 Francs, and 4 points from two ships)

Jean 151 (76 points from 7 buildings, including Wharf, Shipping Line, and Building Office; 39 Francs, 36 points from 3 ships)

This game clocked in at two hours, which surprised us, since we were expecting another three hour game. We all enjoyed the game, though it was not real precise play. Don forgot the rule where you can downgrade steel to iron, and could have built the Church on the last round, worth 26 points. In a previous game, Don had used the furniture factory (a special building that lets you convert leather+wood for 6 Francs, any number of times). So there are some card combinations that we haven't fully optimized yet. I"m looking forward to the next few plays, though I'm not sure I would want to try this game with 4 or 5 players though, based on the amount of time between your turns, and the overall length of the game.



5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Железный комиссар
United States
Madison
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Great session!

One thing:

Quote:
62 pts (steel ships for 8 Francs each, cattle ships for 2 Francs each).


Cattle are worth three francs if you ship them. Meat, on the other hand, is worth two.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Eric Brosius
United States
Needham Heights
Massachusetts
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
JohnRayJr wrote:
Cattle are worth three francs if you ship them. Meat, on the other hand, is worth two.


Yes, it's a bit counterintuitive. Meat sells for less overseas if you slaughter it, while Grain sells for more if you bake it.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Norbert Chan
Canada
Calgary
Alberta
flag msg tools
badge
Wow, so this is what you get for 100 pieces of gold.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Eric Brosius wrote:
JohnRayJr wrote:
Cattle are worth three francs if you ship them. Meat, on the other hand, is worth two.


Yes, it's a bit counterintuitive. Meat sells for less overseas if you slaughter it, while Grain sells for more if you bake it.


Thanks JohnRayJr for spotting that for me. As Eric says, it is a bit counterintuitive. I think we all assumed that "standard" goods were worth less than processed goods, which led us to that scoring error. Thanks again for catching that.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Rob Doupe
Canada
Calgary
Alberta
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks for the report, Norbert. Glad you guys liked the game.

In my game last night, one of my opponents shipped 8 steel for 64 francs as his last action (along with several other goods). He needed the money, because he had 12 loans (he was up to 14 loans at one point). Amazingly, despite the loans he still finished in second with 181 points by ignoring food altogether and focusing on buildings and ships.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Steve Duff
Canada
Ottawa
Ontario
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Norbert Chan wrote:
Don had bought Le Havre from the Sentry Box for $90


Holy crap. Online is low $60's.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Norbert Chan
Canada
Calgary
Alberta
flag msg tools
badge
Wow, so this is what you get for 100 pieces of gold.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Rob Doupe wrote:
Thanks for the report, Norbert. Glad you guys liked the game.

In my game last night, one of my opponents shipped 8 steel for 64 francs as his last action (along with several other goods). He needed the money, because he had 12 loans (he was up to 14 loans at one point). Amazingly, despite the loans he still finished in second with 181 points by ignoring food altogether and focusing on buildings and ships.


Thanks for your recommendation of the game, Rob. I had mentioned the game to Don a couple of weeks back, and I think your e-mail to us was the last straw that convinced him to go pick it up.

14 loans eh....in our games, we may have seen 3 or 4 loans maximum. I don't think we have scratched the surface with loans yet.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Norbert Chan
Canada
Calgary
Alberta
flag msg tools
badge
Wow, so this is what you get for 100 pieces of gold.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
UnknownParkerBrother wrote:
Norbert Chan wrote:
Don had bought Le Havre from the Sentry Box for $90


Holy crap. Online is low $60's.


Yes, it is true: some people have more money than brains. I guess we could have researched the online stores, but after you figure in the shipping and everything, it's not too unreasonable.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Lindsay Scholle
Australia
St Ives, 2075
NSW
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Eric Brosius wrote:
JohnRayJr wrote:
Cattle are worth three francs if you ship them. Meat, on the other hand, is worth two.


Yes, it's a bit counterintuitive. Meat sells for less overseas if you slaughter it, while Grain sells for more if you bake it.


Seems reasonable to me. I prefer my meat fresh (and my bread stale?). Okay, maybe it's a bit counterintuitive. In Australia we call them "live meat exports," and in some countries it's the only way they'll accept their meat.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Don Smith
Canada
Calgary
Alberta
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Norbert Chan wrote:
UnknownParkerBrother wrote:
Norbert Chan wrote:
Don had bought Le Havre from the Sentry Box for $90


Holy crap. Online is low $60's.


Yes, it is true: some people have more money than brains. I guess we could have researched the online stores, but after you figure in the shipping and everything, it's not too unreasonable.


and some people have more brains than money - it's a cruel world...

;^)
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Wei-Hwa Huang
United States
San Jose
California
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Eric Brosius wrote:
JohnRayJr wrote:
Cattle are worth three francs if you ship them. Meat, on the other hand, is worth two.


Yes, it's a bit counterintuitive. Meat sells for less overseas if you slaughter it, while Grain sells for more if you bake it.


It's the name recognition. Ever heard of "French Steak"? I didn't think so.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.