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World War 3» Forums » Rules

Subject: Meaning of counter values? rss

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John Carper
Japan
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OK, having everything but the rules of this game I'm trying to work out how to adapt the "Global War" rules which are available online to it. One thing that is unclear to me is the meanings of the dual figures on that game's air and naval units (also seen on "WW3's" subs). If movement, ZOC range and the like are standardized and vary with time frame, what do the two figures mean? Are the meanings the same in both games?

Also, what's the point of the players' chit selection on the nuclear confrontation table? I presume it represents some sort of brinksmanship and that whichever player bids higher must gain some benefit (assuming escalation is avoided, of course).
 
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Lance McMillan
United States
Lakebay
Washington
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Don't own the game and only played it once, but if memory serves the counters (for the most part) only had one "value" on them -- the other, smaller, number simply denoted how many "units" of that type the counter represented.
 
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John Carper
Japan
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Yeah, that's the superscript. The dual values are more common in "Global War," where most air and naval units have them. The "WW3" subs also have them though, with the SSBNs having an "S" in place of the first value, which seems to match what's on the SAC and ICBM counters.

I believe in all cases the figures differ by a factor of two. Is it something like attack/defence?
 
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Ian Raine
Australia
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jjcarp wrote:
Yeah, that's the superscript. The dual values are more common in "Global War," where most air and naval units have them. The "WW3" subs also have them though, with the SSBNs having an "S" in place of the first value, which seems to match what's on the SAC and ICBM counters.

I believe in all cases the figures differ by a factor of two. Is it something like attack/defence?


Yes Attack/Defense, and the superscript is the number of "fleets". I can't remember if the CRTs are exactly the same but believe they are.

Note that in WW3 any mobile ground unit may advance after combat, but if it does and you are using the nuclear rules (which are optional) it causes a nuclear confrontation chit draw at the option of the defending player. Seems to reflect the possibility that a reversal in the ground war over an area the size of a WW3 hex might prompt a tac-nuke response against the advancing enemy spearheads. When picking chits, lower # chits reduce the chance of a strategic conflagaration, but if as attacker you pick a lower chit than the defender you don't get to advance... The player who initiated the attack loses in the event of a nuclear holocaust so its a bit of a connundrum. A defender might just grab his 9 chit each time, and a 'draw' on the chits also means no advance ater combat but a 20% chance minimum the game ends and the defender wins. With the surprise rule operating the Soviets are better off destroying the NATO/US ground forces without attempting advance after combat and then overrunning the remnants in turn 2 in the movement phase to avoid the prospect of 'losing' on the first turn.

Note also that all mobile ground units have an air zone which extends one hex over water. It needs to be contested by Surf A (or another mobile ground unit air zone) to mount an amphib assault. The air zone exerting unit can also perform a transit attack on a surface naval unit exiting the zone. Or an SS moving in fast mode. But never on an SSN. The attack strength is the number of strength points of the ground unit.

The rest of the mechanics are virtually identical to Global War, with one major change - naval units do not have to go home to port in the third phase, they can remain at sea like the USN in GW. When they trace supply next turn they can be transit attacked as if they were moving. Note also the larger scale means MS pipelines extend three from the holding hex instead of five.
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John Carper
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Thanks, Ian. That should be enough to get me going. Now I'll have a use for Bob Zmuda's excellent map.
 
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Cassandra Harbinger
United States
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I've always considered the land forces counters to represent 100,000 men. For the U.S. that would be a Corps of two divisions, and for the Sovieta a four division army. This includes tactical air forces assigned to the forces.
 
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Paul Evans
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I think that the confrontation rules only really work if, when you want to advance after combat or make a retaliatory strike, the SAME chits are used to determine both the ability to advance or retaliate AND to determine the confrontation total to test for holocaust. For advance and retaliation, the rules refer to following "the procedure in 23.31" which, since it refers to the chit draw, might imply drawing a second time. The risks and options are much better reflected if both sides have to decide how near the brink they have to go to prevent or secure that advance or whatever....And just to make it interesting, should the holocaust occur, the "loser" should be the person who chose the highest value chit (since, by implication, it was that side which was most likely to have initiated an all-out strike and its inevitable retaliation).
 
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