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Subject: Agincourt 1415 rss

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Peter Carr
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Perth
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Agincourt 1415

All optional rules for representation of the French army on the day are being used. The cumulative (+1) DRM for continuity is in effect.

The battle starts with things already having gone to ‘hell in a hand basket’ for the French.

The French, obsessed by their defensive concept and wallowing in self confidence and booze, have allowed the English enough time to pitch their partial palisade within English longbow range of their troops. Consequently, the English have had their centre advance so that their hail of arrows against the French foot troops has essentially forced them to attack before they are able to organize a coherent battle line. And this is where we join the battle.

Pic 1 – setup.


Having received a volley of English longbow fire the Duke of Orleans makes the decision to charge the English line. The charge is more of a trudge, and the disordered French are unable to make contact with the English line, excepting the French cavalry on the English left. They position to charge (special rule for Agincourt – disordered cavalry can/must charge) through their own infantry and into Camois’ and his Dismounted Men-at-Arms. They are successful without incident to the French infantry; however, affect no damage on the English defenders as they are forced to retire (and are subsequently eliminated) by bow fire from Camois’ men jeering from the palisade. Lord Rambures moves his Missile Battle forward; however, inferior to their English counterparts most are just out of effective range. One crossbow unit is in range and exchanges fire with English longbow men to no effect. Finally, the Duke of Orleans is able to pull off a remarkable feat of leadership and rallies his troops before momentum passes to Camois.


Score (3 –vs- 0) advantage England.

Camois concentrates longbow fire on Rambures’ crossbow men – but the fire is inaccurate and there are no casualties. The Duke of York targets the French bowmen on the English right, forcing 2 units to retreat. King Henry also targets the French bowmen, forcing 1 unit to retreat.

Momentum passes to the French, and the Duke or Orleans’ men crash into the English line. Five of the Dukes units are disordered, including the mounted troops on the French left. In the shock combat phase the French are able to disorder Henry’s unit of bowmen, and although the French left is able to maintain contact, the right is thrown back. Rambures next rallies his missile troops, and then momentum is carried on with another push from The Duke of Orleans. The Duke of Orleans make no more headway, indeed the French left is now pushed back too and but 1 unit remains in contact with the English.

Pic 2 – disordered bowmen


Momentum crosses to Camois who concentrates bow fire on the French missile units. One French crossbow unit is eliminated and another disordered, before momentum passes back to the French.

Score (5 –vs- 0) advantage England.

The Duke of Orleans makes another push. All but one unit is disrupted by reaction bow fire. In the shock phase the French breakthrough the English line; King Henry’s longbow men are retired and one of the Duke of York’s longbow units is disrupted and retreats – though bowfire disrupts the victorious French men-at-arms as they advance over the palisade. Momentum passes over to the English.

Score (5 –vs- 1) advantage England {assuming retired English longbows are till 1 point).

Pic 3 – French Breakthrough!


Note: It seems a good strategy to avoid putting French units in hexes 1912 and 1918 – they will just get mauled by bow fire. It seems too, that there may be an opportunity to flank the English left or put weight on the English right at hexes 1811 and 1812. However, the French here have been successful by keeping the earlier disrupted English unit engaged and ensuring sacrificial numerically inferior attacks on 1 flank to ensure at least 1 or 2 attacks on the earlier disrupted English unit (Kink Henry’s longbow men). It remains to be seen if the English can now recover.

The Duke of York retires the French mounted attack on their flank and the breakthrough French unit in hex 2013. The disordered English bowmen move to the palisade. The Duke of York’s men-at-arms change facing to take on the disrupted French that have crossed the palisade in hex 2015, but must also attack the French in hex 1914. The Duke of York’s men successfully retire both French units causing much disruption as they flee to their battle standard, and subsequently eliminated as they leave the field – hurrah! King Henry moves up his reserve bowmen and fires into the disrupted French ranks, retiring another of the Duke of Orleans units. Momentum now passes to the French.

Score (14-vs-1) advantage England.

With the Duke of Orleans battle destroyed or retired for the most part, and the English line restored, Rambures tries to create a gap with his own bow fire, but succeeds only in disrupting Henry’s bowmen before momentum passes to the English.

The Duke of York is able to disrupt a unit of French Archers, but it costs the disruption of his two flanking longbow men, and all too soon momentum passes to the French.

Rambures fails to cause further disruption and momentum passes to the English.

The Duke of York rallies his bowmen and disrupts French archers with another. Henry rallies his archers as the Duke of York fires another volley of arrows, retiring a unit of French bowmen and forcing the Duke of Orleans’ men at arms to retreat in disorder. Momentum passes to the French.

Score (15-vs-1) advantage England.

Rambures fires again and disrupts Henry’s bowmen. Alencon rallies his battle in preparation for his advance and momentum passes to the English.

The Duke of York is able to retire one of the French archers for no loss and Henry rallies his archers. York forces the Duke of Orleans to retreat out of bow range and momentum passes to the French.

Score (16-vs-1) advantage England.


Alencon advances and Rambures is able to bring enough missile fire onto Henry’s bowmen so that one unit is wiped out! Faquembourg is activated and rallies his troops before momentum passes to the English.
Score (16-vs-2) advantage England.

Pic 4 – a gap in the line – but no men-at-arms to exploit it


Henry rallies retired bowmen by the battle standard – he will need them to plug the gap.

Rambures now concentrates bow fire on Henry’s men-at-arms – eliminating the unit and control passes back to the English.

Score (16-vs-6) advantage England.

York moves a unit of archers into hex 2015, but they are disrupted by French reaction fire. The English active fire and eliminate the French archers, but they are forced back by return fire. Henry rushes up his disordered bowmen and retires a unit of French crossbow men – but the English are cut to ribbons and eliminated. Henry is now in serious trouble and commands Camois to leave the flanks and cover the centre. York repositions before control passes to the French.
Score (19-vs-6) advantage England.

Pic 5 – shrinking flank.


Alencon advances.

Camois retires one of the Duke of Orleans’ men-at-arms and control passes to the French.



Score (22-vs-6) advantage England – note, flight tests (for the French) are now made after all non-continuity actions.

Alencon advances onto the English line; one French unit is eliminated by longbow fire. In the shock phase all but the unit Alencon commands are thrown back. Alencon forces the English right flank to fold. Faquembourg advances and control passes to the English.

Score (25+9=34-vs-6) French loss.

Pic 6 – final positions.


CONCLUSIONS

Quite an exciting game at times. The interest in the scenario comes when/if the French can get just a little toe hold on the English line then there is the feel that the French can win if luck holds. Unfortunately, in this game, Farquembourg didn’t get into the fight before the French were routed, which is a shame; and certainly a higher French rout level would give us more of a bloodbath, which is what we’d expect – especially with all the realism options turned on.

For me, the game played very quickly and ended just as things were getting interesting.

If anything the system lacks enough depth to give (me) the feel of the attrition on the field. It would be nice to see gradual cohesion loss like in GBoH. However, battles from this period were fought with fewer men, and perhaps the game mechanics reflect that well with units simply removed from action or eliminated – make up your own mind.

Since the game is on special at GMT it’s certainly worth a throw if you’re interested in the period. With only a few battles represented and fairly generic counters you can try your hand at DIY scenarios.
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Christopher
Belgium
De Panne
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Nice AAR, thanks for sharing!

I assume you played it solo?

--edit: I made a mentioning of this AAR in the Agincourt forums: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/421365
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Peter Carr
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Yes - it was solo.
Thanks for the link.
cheers
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Richard Berg
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Noce AAR . .

"... perhaps the game mechanics reflect that well with units simply removed from action or eliminated ..."

Actually, they reflect the focus on making the game relatively easy and fast to play, with a minimal amount of counter clutter . . .

The next in the series, INFIDEL, has lots of neat battles . . .

RHB
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