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Subject: New to trick taking. What exactly makes up a trick? rss

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eduardo espada
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Is it the cards you yourself put down, or all the cards put down by each player during that trick? For instance: 7788,8899,991010, and I win with QQKK, do I receive all the cards mentioned? Or do other players take their losing tricks back in their hands to be played again?
 
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Dan Blum
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All the cards played are included in the trick. (Note that in most trick-taking games, a trick is made up of exactly one card from each player - this is not true in Tichu, but all the cards played are still included in the trick.)
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Mark M
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This response is technically correct but it is more fun if everyone takes back their own cards and then replays the same sequence of cards until the first person becomes bored and is declared the winner.
 
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eduardo espada
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Dan, thanks for clearing that up.

Mark, thanks for the sarcasm. No, really. Thanks for taking the time.
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David F
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I've always thought trick-taking refers to Heart, Spades, Bridge etc, where everybody plays 1 card, and the trick goes to the person with the strongest card.

I don't think of Tichu as trick-taking (it's a climbing game instead), since you can pass but jump in again, and not everybody plays the same amount of cards. Hence, I wouldn't really call anything in Tichu a trick.

It's just semantics, but I think referring to both styles of games as trick-taking glosses over the fact that these are very different genres (e.g. I know a lot of people who love Tichu but hate, Hearts/Spades/Bridge and vice versa).
 
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Chris Sniezek
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It's not just semantics. A trick is defined as one card played by each player in turn, starting with a leader, after which the cards are evaluated to see which of the players wins. Trick-taking games revolve primarily around the number of tricks taken or the cards captured in the process.

Tichu is foremost a shedding game, where the primary objective is to play out your hand as quickly as possible. It's in the secondary objectives (where neither team manages to shed both their hands before either opponent can) that it shares elements of a trick-taking game.


 
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Tim Stellmach
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selwyth wrote:
It's just semantics, but I think referring to both styles of games as trick-taking glosses over the fact that these are very different genres (e.g. I know a lot of people who love Tichu but hate, Hearts/Spades/Bridge and vice versa).


On the contrary, I'd say that games where the players successively form and collect pools of cards are a common enough pattern to need a name, and using "trick-taking" to refer only to the Whist family needlessly obfuscates matters.
 
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Chris Sjoholm
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timstellmach wrote:
selwyth wrote:
It's just semantics, but I think referring to both styles of games as trick-taking glosses over the fact that these are very different genres (e.g. I know a lot of people who love Tichu but hate, Hearts/Spades/Bridge and vice versa).


On the contrary, I'd say that games where the players successively form and collect pools of cards are a common enough pattern to need a name, and using "trick-taking" to refer only to the Whist family needlessly obfuscates matters.


I think the term you're looking for is "climbing trick" games, where the "trick" continues as long as players keep playing a higher value set to it.

-- Chris
 
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Aaron Fuegi
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csniezek wrote:

It's not just semantics. A trick is defined as one card played by each player in turn, starting with a leader, after which the cards are evaluated to see which of the players wins. Trick-taking games revolve primarily around the number of tricks taken or the cards captured in the process.


I actually don't disagree with you. Pretty agnostic on this issue. However, it is truthfully pretty hard to make rules. Don't know if you have played Foppen but it breaks several of the rules above (not every player plays a card in every trick and it is about not losing tricks, winning tricks is secondary) and is pretty obviously, to me at least, a trick taking game. Can think of another game where the 'one card' rule is violated that is also obviously a trick-taking game. Hard to make simple rules.
 
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Eric Brosius
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aarondf@bu.edu wrote:
Don't know if you have played Foppen but it breaks several of the rules above


Yes, if you told someone that Foppen is a trick-taking game in which the goal is to get rid of all your cards before other people do, they'd think you were crazy. But that's what it is.
 
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Chris Sniezek
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aarondf@bu.edu wrote:
csniezek wrote:

It's not just semantics. A trick is defined as one card played by each player in turn, starting with a leader, after which the cards are evaluated to see which of the players wins. Trick-taking games revolve primarily around the number of tricks taken or the cards captured in the process.


I actually don't disagree with you. Pretty agnostic on this issue. However, it is truthfully pretty hard to make rules. Don't know if you have played Foppen but it breaks several of the rules above (not every player plays a card in every trick and it is about not losing tricks, winning tricks is secondary) and is pretty obviously, to me at least, a trick taking game. Can think of another game where the 'one card' rule is violated that is also obviously a trick-taking game. Hard to make simple rules.


It's easy to make simple rules; it's hard to make them universally applicable.

Tichu, like many card games is a multiple-mechanic or multi-genre game. While its primary mechanic and goal is shedding/climbing, it has elements of a trick-taking game in that cards captured during shedding have value. (I'm not familiar with Foppen, but I'm a longtime player of trick/meld multigenre games such as Pinochle and Jass.)


 
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