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Subject: Defending the Village rss

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Brandon Richards
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OK. Village is one of those cards that are taking a hard hit on BGG. People are starting to assign its name the “Village Idiot” and are associating it with new players. This may be true that new players see it as a fun card and are quick to buy up many of them. What they don’t realize is that the true way to win at Dominion is in buying power. However, underneath the newbie charm is a card that is strong enough to have it’s own strategy, which when used correctly, can defeat even the most experienced Dominion player.

Experienced players of Dominion should be able to complete a game by turn 20, assuming there are no game slowing cards in the current ten (Militia, Witch, Swindler, etc.). That means that each player should be able to acquire at least 3 provinces by turn 20, if not sooner, when playing a four player game. So on the outset, a person vying for the Village strategy needs to gain the provinces at a faster rate. I have found that by turn 15, a person with the Village strategy can have up to 4 provinces in their deck. Only a few other strategies can boast of this speed (Chapel comes to mind). But Chapel players will have discarded their initial Estates, and the Village player will still have theirs.

So how does one employ the Village strategy? The first requirement is to realize that Village is a means to an end, and not a fun card that gives the player multiple actions. It is a free card (a card that replaces itself) and gives one additional action to use. That is all it is! So by itself, it is not a particularly strong card. What the player needs to realize is that they need to put that additional action to good use.

That said, the object of the village strategy is to cycle through your deck every turn and have enough of the real power, money, to buy victory points. Ultimately, a player should be able to do a double province buy at least once, and sometimes twice during a game of Dominion.

In order to cycle through your deck, you will need some big draw cards. The best one for the money is Smithy. It draws three cards and pairs nicely with Village for a total of four new cards every time they are paired, with an action left over. One of the cards drawn must be a Village, and the other a Smithy, or you must have an extra one of these in hand if you had bad luck. Moat doesn’t work as a strong draw card because you won’t be able to cycle through your whole deck quickly enough.

You will also need buying power, specifically at least 16 coins. Amazingly enough, three golds paired with seven coppers gives exactly 16 coins, enough for two provinces. And the player is lucky enough to start with seven coppers, more than enough to purchase the first gold needed to increase buying power. The need of the Village and Smithy is have enough draw power to get six of the seven coppers for the first gold buy. After that, buys will come a lot easier.

Finally, the player will need one card that gives an extra buy, preferably one that provides money in order to attempt a second double province buy.

The cards you will need to put the Village to good use, which you can buy in any order are:
Seven coppers
Three estates
Three golds
Five villages
Five smithies
One + buy card

Five Villages and five Smithies will be exactly enough to get you through your entire deck at this point, with one action left over to cap off your turn with a +1 buy card. At one buy a turn, you will have a double province buy at turn 15. But to add insult to injury, if you get that plus one buy card early enough, you can perform one or even two double buys getting to that stage in the game, allowing you to do a double province buy at turn 13 or 14. Wow. Now if Woodcutter, is your plus one buy card, you have two extra coins to work with on your next turn, netting you at least one province, and sometimes two. If Baron is your plus one buy card, you have a very good chance to netting a double province buy twice in a row. After that, your engine will be running on fumes, but you should still have enough draw and money power to crank out a Province or two, or a few Duchies and even Estates as needed.

Here are other cards that I would consider to mix and match, substituting one for the other.

Mining Village is even better than Village in that you can get rid of them in the end game to increase your disintegrating buying power. I would recommend against Festival because it does not have the extra draw.

Both Torturer and Council Room are very good replacements for Smithy. Specifically you can be playing three Torturers every turn, really messing with other player decks. Nobles can also substitute for Smithy, but I wouldn’t use it for Village.

The best plus buys too use would be Woodcutter, Council Room, Baron, Bridge, and maybe Market if there were no other plus buys with money.

Does this strategy work every time? Of course not. It all depends on the interest in Villages and Smithies between all players. But this strategy holds up very well to most attack cards, and if you allow me to get five Villages you better get to those Provinces faster than I can.
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Dave G
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JovenShadowcaster wrote:
I hate it when people call Village a NOOB card. It is not a NOOB card, nor is Chapel or Laboratory broken cards, or Chancellor or Thief underpowered cards. They are all fun cards to play. In a game such as this, one should be welcome to play however they see fit, and Village is a LOT of fun to play, because it lets you do a lot more cool stuff with your turn (and it's easier to get than Festival).

Village is probably my favorite card because it makes for awesome combos, like Council Room & Militia, Spy & Thief, Chapel & Library, Secret Chamber & Library, et-cetera.


But to be fair...buying a bunch of villages with no complementary actions and then playing them all in a row to end up with 4 treasure in hand is, quite literally, the kind of play a newbie to the game makes. Of course Village is a fine card, in a set with no extra actions I will almost always get one. One. Maybe two. Not seven.
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Yaron Racah
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filovirus wrote:
Experienced players of Dominion should be able to complete a game by turn 20, assuming there are no game slowing cards in the current ten (Militia, Witch, Swindler, etc.). That means that each player should be able to acquire at least 3 provinces by turn 20, if not sooner, when playing a four player game. So on the outset, a person vying for the Village strategy needs to gain the provinces at a faster rate. I have found that by turn 15, a person with the Village strategy can have up to 4 provinces in their deck. Only a few other strategies can boast of this speed (Chapel comes to mind). But Chapel players will have discarded their initial Estates, and the Village player will still have theirs.


I think your benchmarks are several turns off.

The simplest pure-money strategy (just get Silver, Gold and Provinces), in the absence of attacks, averages 4 Provinces in 16.9 turns. So no matter the card mix (barring attacks, of course), there's no reason for an experienced player to take 20 turns.

With Smithy in the set, you can average 14.74 turns (get one Smithy a.s.a.p., and another after your 3rd shuffle. Everything else is Silver, Gold and Provinces).

(This is based on computer simulations. Some are reported in http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/400371, others in http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/420032).

Smithy is in the cardset you are analysing, so any elaborate strategy needs to compete with consistent turn 15 wins (producable by simple money+Smithy). In testing (using Market as the source of +buys, and Cellar for extra consistency), I found that your strategy can win on turn 15 (or even earlier, using +buys to get multiple Villages/Smithies in one turn), but it usually will not. Here are two major things that can go wrong:

1. Late Gold. Without Silver, it's very hard to get Gold. You might make several passes over your Village/Smithy/Copper/Estate deck before you manage to hit that crucial 6. Ironically, my fastest game (4 Provinces in turn 13) was the one in which I was lucky enough to hit 6 early, then hit 6 multiple times (courtesy of the original Gold), and just started getting Provinces. I only got one Village and Smithy that whole game (so it would have been even better if the Village was a Silver).

2. No Village hands. Of course, any turn in which you start with Smithies and no Villages is a dead turn. I made an effort to balance the number of Villages and Smithies in my decks (getting Village with 4 if I had too many Smithies), but it still happened a lot, causing quite a few games to go to turn 18 or 19.

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K. Bailey
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yaron wrote:
The simplest pure-money strategy (just get Silver, Gold and Provinces), in the absence of attacks, averages 4 Provinces in 16.9 turns. So no matter the card mix (barring attacks, of course), there's no reason for an experienced player to take 20 turns.

Well, this is true only so far as you think "getting 4 Provinces" is the same as finishing the game. Which it usually is, but it will lose to a strategy that gets say, 3 Duchies instead of 1 Province, or a pure-money deck that favors Harems over Provinces. The pure-money deck gets 5 Provinces, but the game takes longer, and it loses.

Also considering Attacks, I don't think it's quite right to hold up the "bot-time to 4 Provinces" as some fundamental rule of real Dominion play.
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spags
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Good points. I've played hundreds of games now on BSW, and I've won a number because people loaded up on Villages, but never bought significant $$$. SO, all those cards in one's hand for ... what? It's a classic (n00b?) mistake.

However, I wouldn't call Village a beginner's card. Multiple actions are tough to come by, esp. when playing random sets. SO, people do gravitate towards the card, because it's a superior card, esp. when compared to most other 3 cost cards (Workshop, Woodcutter, Chancellor). The introduction of something like the Swindler will reduce the Village's frequency of use, imho, just like other new cards will (hopefully) reduce the usage of things like Witch.

Speaking of n00b cards ... I'd say attack cards in general are pretty simple, due to their blunt efficiency. Yes, Militia and Witch, I'm looking at you. At least some of the newer attack cards (Minion, Torturer) offer some choice. However, couldn't the same be said of most of the new set?
 
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Chris Martin
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JovenShadowcaster wrote:
I hate it when people call Village a NOOB card. It is not a NOOB card, nor is Chapel or Laboratory broken cards, or Chancellor or Thief underpowered cards. They are all fun cards to play. In a game such as this, one should be welcome to play however they see fit, and Village is a LOT of fun to play, because it lets you do a lot more cool stuff with your turn (and it's easier to get than Festival).

I hate it when people call it "FOOL's Mate". It is not FOOLish. It is a fun way to play. In a game such as chess, one should be welcome to play however they see fit, and Fool's Mate is a LOT of fun to play, because it lets you get in a lot of games since you lose so quickly and reliably.
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Matt N

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chrisjwmartin wrote:

I hate it when people call it "FOOL's Mate". It is not FOOLish. It is a fun way to play. In a game such as chess, one should be welcome to play however they see fit, and Fool's Mate is a LOT of fun to play, because it lets you get in a lot of games since you lose so quickly and reliably.

Amusing... but true. If you have to defend cards by saying they're fun, as opposed to them being effective, that's not a good sign.

That being said, Chapel is nearly broken, just because there are only a few combo type strategies, which do not come up every time, that are 50%+ against it in my experience. Still, it's an addition to a strategy, not a strategy itself. Laboratory is good, but it ain't the best when witch or gardens are a major factor. Chancellor is a terrible card and strictly dominated by almost any set of cards I can think of. Yeah, it's better than a silver if your deck has no other actions, but there's always something better to buy on your first two turns.

Thief isn't underpowered per se; it's just a larger group card. Try playing a 4+ player game when the thief is out without getting one; you'll see the folly of your ways if other people get one.

I will say that village + council room + militia is one of the more enjoyable strategies to play, and is even a competitive one a fair amount of the time, depending on how you get there.

Back to OP... It's a big mistake to get a village instead of a festival, unless you're thoroughly convinced that one card is better than two coins and one buy. Witch turns that deck into trash; money-based decks (or festivals or markets) are much more resilient against the witch. You would need cellar(s) to make the deck work then, and I still wouldn't recommend it.

I wouldn't call village a NOOB card, but it's just a situational card.
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Mike Young
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I have found Village to be particularly useful when teamed with Council Room and Intrigue's Secret Chamber.
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Matt N

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Well, a lot of people including myself enjoy games by being competitive at them. Fun vs. skill are not mutually exclusive. (I'm sure this argument has played out hundreds of times on this site.)

As for card balance, you brought it up... I'll not drag this out, but I can't think of any way the Chancellor makes the game more fun. Finally, a chance to shuffle more...

I don't hate villages at all. I also don't think the OP's strategy is the strongest way to use villages. If you can find an effective way to use villages, that's great; I did like that combo you mentioned. I suppose the OP's strategy could be handy for use in 4+ player games with the thief, since you'd get looted less than your money-heavy opponents. You'd still want a couple silvers though.

If you want to have lots of fun while playing well, I'd strongly recommend 4+ player games. The multitude of attacks make the game much more dynamic and fun.
 
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Chris Martin
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JovenShadowcaster wrote:
Umm... well, I'm in the gaming hobby. Something not fun is something not worth doing. Dunno what you're into, but being fun IS the ultimate defense. Something not being FUN is a bad sign. [/bubble popped]

I hear from my mate Jez Bentham that shove ha'penny is the shiz niz.
 
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Buggy wrote:
I have found Village to be particularly useful when teamed with Council Room and Intrigue's Secret Chamber.


In other words, Village (and, of course, Festival) also work when paired with powerful Action cards -- particularly ones which provide you with more cards. In the Interaction set, Village and Festival shine by pairing with all sorts of Attack cards.
 
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Greg Jones
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I don't think anybody's saying the Village is a noob card. The "Village Idiot" refers to a whole "strategy". It's where they play like 8 Villages, and no other action cards, and buy a Village. One can only assume they think the +1 card power of the Village is great and they've done very well by drawing +8 cards in their turn.

Your strategy is not completely brain-dead. I wouldn't call it simple a Village strategy, though. I'd call it a Village-Smithy strategy. It could work with other +cards cards, but it needs at least two particular action cards to work. Just having the Village in the set doesn't make it possible.

The problem with your perfect balance of 5 Villages and 5 Smithies is that it works very well if you draw all of them, but you cannot guarantee that you draw your deck in the right order. There's a 40% chance of not drawing both a Village and a Smithy in any given hand. If you do, now you have 7 cards, so your chances are better. About 26% chance of failure at this point. Overall, without calculating it exactly, I estimate the chance of drawing all 5 Villages and Smithies at about 20%.

That's alright. Most of the time you can get at least one Province. I'd guess your chances are a bit better if you pad the deck with a few more Villages, which are reasonably cheap. At the same time, you might just give up the goal of going for double-Province turns, and then you don't need all 5 Villages and Smithies. You can get started buying single Provinces sooner.

I think going for the double-Province buy is only advisable if you prune your deck with the Chapel or the Moneylender. That means you need to buy more Golds, but a lot fewer Villages and Smithies. Five Gold and maybe keep 1 Copper, plus one Village, one Smithy, and one +buy card has a chance to draw your whole deck the first time, but after you add the first 2 Provinces, you'll need more. So you want a minimum of 2 Villages and 2 Smithies. Throw in an extra Village or two to increase your odds of starting the chain.

It also works better with the Council Room. That's not only because you get one more card per use, but because if other people have the same idea, you get to see more cards before your turn. Even if they use the Militia, you get your choice from a larger selection of cards and have a better chance to to draw the required Village and +cards card.

I used to use the Village-Smithy strategy a lot, but I have since decided that it can usually be beaten by either a less complex strategy or a more complex strategy.

filovirus wrote:
I would recommend against Festival because it does not have the extra draw.


A Festival works like a Village and a Silver combined; if you played a Village and drew a Silver, you have something similar (plus a +buy). If you buy Festivals, you don't need as many treasure cards, so maybe you don't need as many extra draws to draw your whole deck. Just like you don't get to choose the exact order you draw your deck, you don't really get to decide the exact composition of your deck at the start of the game. Suppose you draw 5 coins and are short on Villages. What will you buy? Buy a Smithy even though you're likely to not have enough actions to play it? Buy a Village, favoring the +1 card over +2 coins?

filovirus wrote:
Nobles can also substitute for Smithy, but I wouldn’t use it for Village.


The main value of Nobles is that they can substitute for either. If you have 5 Villages and 5 Nobles, you haven't increased your chances of drawing your whole deck. You have to play all the Nobles for +3 cards to do so. But if you have 3 Villages, 5 Nobles, and 2 Smithies, you have. If you draw 3 Smithies in your hand, it doesn't go far. But if you draw 3 Nobles instead, it does.
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J K
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I just tried village strategy single play, and it seems even more powerful than described here (of course in multiplayer your plans can be interrupted by other players in many ways). Note I didn't use Festival card which I guess could help to make even better results (as I've run out of Village cards very fast in supply and couldn't keep proper balance). Also using Throne Room most probably could get even better results (and substitute for shortage in Village cards effectively).

Target: build an initial deck of action cards which you cycle in one turn with near 100% probability.
Rule 1. To keep balance in deck, for even amount of cards in deck Village cards should constitute (half) or (half - 2) of your deck. For odd amount of cards, Village cards should constitute (round down half) of cards. So don't forget to get new Village card
Rule 2. You need a single Chapel to trash all Copper and Estate cards (probably you will get time to Remodel one Estate and you will remodel the Chapel later).
Rule 3. Use Workshops to gain new Smithy/Remodel/Village/Workshop cards.
4. Keep balanced amount of Smithies - calculate how many you need of them in deck (combined with Villages) to reliably cycle through deck each time.
5. Use Remodel to convert excess Smithy and Remodel cards to Gold (suggestion to get one Gold card early to use it as an additional resource to buy Village card each turn).
6. Use Remodel to convert Gold cards to Province cards (and when your deck gets overcrowded with Province cards, you may find that it's time to convert those Workshops to Duchy cards).

Note that this deck gets yet another nice power - playing well, you can in the same turn cycle your deck, buy new cards into discard, and with Smithy put those into your hand - and use them in same turn.
So after 11 turns I had a nice deck (don't remember exactly, but it was all 10 Village cards, about 3 Workshop, 4 Remodel cards, 4 Smithy cards and 1 Gold). From this point, you can decide at what speed you want to convert your deck into VP cards. What I did, I spent turn 12 to get 3 more Gold cards
In turn 12 I got my deck bigger with more cards.
In turn 13 I got 3 more Gold cards, and bought one Province with Gold cards.
Turn 14 was unlucky draw (my deck was already not optimal in size), and instead of expected 4 provinces I converted only 3 from Gold.
Turn 15 converted another Province.
Turn 16 - completely unlucky draw.
Turn 17 - 1 Province
Turn 18 - 2 Provinces
Turn 19 - 1 Province and 2 Duchy cards.

Summary: 5 Provinces in 15 turns, 9 Provinces + 2 Duchies in 19 turns.
With some more luck (as mine was below average expectation near final turns) results could be even better (1-2 turns less to get Turn 19 result).
 
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Guy Srinivasan
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weidox wrote:
Summary: 5 Provinces in 15 turns, 9 Provinces + 2 Duchies in 19 turns.
With some more luck (as mine was below average expectation near final turns) results could be even better (1-2 turns less to get Turn 19 result).

Hitting single-turn-expectation in a single turn is expected. Hitting single-turn-expectation in all of your turns is getting really lucky.
 
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weidox wrote:
Note that this deck gets yet another nice power - playing well, you can in the same turn cycle your deck, buy new cards into discard, and with Smithy put those into your hand - and use them in same turn.


Sounds like you might be playing something wrong. You can't buy cards and then play more actions in the same turn. You can, however, gain cards via actions and then play more actions in the same turn.
 
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Andrew Hardin
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Hmm.

In theory this kind of thing works, but two things caught my eye.

#1) You got all 10 Villages. Maybe in a 2-player game against an opponent who thinks Villages are dumb.

#2) Your combination used Workshop, Village, Remodel and Smithy. This is not exactly a likely combination.

What you are really noticing in the strong combined effects of mixing several cards together:

a) Village/Smithy (the card drawing combo)
b) Village/Remodel (gives the Remodel the ability to be used several times in a round and +1 Card from the Village gives you the card needed by the Remodel)
c) Remodel/Workshop (in two steps you get a Gold)

Village/Smithy is a well discussed and nice two card combination. The Remodel is very nice in this mix because it can be used often, and the Workshop is the card that feeds the Remodel machine.

This is one of those fairly unusual card combinations in the Base 25 that really rewards going for an Action heavy approach. It is really the combination of all 4 together that I can see doing a lot of damage.

- Lex


 
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David desJardins
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LexH wrote:
#2) Your combination used Workshop, Village, Remodel and Smithy. This is not exactly a likely combination.


He also required Chapel, the most powerful card of the lot.
 
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Greg Jones
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LexH wrote:
#2) Your combination used Workshop, Village, Remodel and Smithy. This is not exactly a likely combination.


Let's not be too critical. It is a perfectly good deck. I have used it. That combination does come up from time to time.

I don't think you need all 10 Villages. With this kind of deck, I probably would buy Villages until the pile ran out, but if I got my fair share I wouldn't be worried.

The strategy doesn't really need the Chapel. It certainly does work a lot better with it, but so does just about everything.

I like to play it without the Workshop, even if it's available. Instead I let the Remodels do the equivalent job. I Remodel an Estate when they come up together. I also keep a little bit of treasure in the deck. When I run out of Estates, I buy 2-cost cards (preferably Cellars or Moats, but I might even buy Estates). Then I Remodel those. I don't get 4-cost cards from a Workshop, but I do get a 4-cost card on most turns: either I Remodel a 2-cost card and buy one to replace it, or I buy a 4-cost card.
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Andrew Hardin
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morningstar wrote:
LexH wrote:
#2) Your combination used Workshop, Village, Remodel and Smithy. This is not exactly a likely combination.


Let's not be too critical. It is a perfectly good deck. I have used it. That combination does come up from time to time.


Most of the cards (if not all) are in the basic setup. I don't have the list in front of me though. I once played a guy online who had 1000+ plays and essentially refused to play anything but that set. Needless to say he was pretty good at it.

I think the idea is fine. I can agree with the principle that the Village is an excellent cornerstone of any strategy that revolves around firing off a lot of Actions.

And this looks like a nice combination of Actions.

morningstar wrote:

I don't think you need all 10 Villages. With this kind of deck, I probably would buy Villages until the pile ran out, but if I got my fair share I wouldn't be worried.

The strategy doesn't really need the Chapel. It certainly does work a lot better with it, but so does just about everything.


If the Chapel is in play I probably use a simpler combination. You don't really need the Smithy if you can draw your whole hand using Villages. With the Chapel in play you can draw much of your hand using Villages and you can start churning Provinces a bit faster. In a Province/Remodel strategy you can often afford to just get to 4 Provinces and then remove the remaining Provinces each turn.

I can see this mixing very well with the Noble.

I am fond of Remodel based strategies. In the Base 25 it is one of the strategies that can work by focusing on Action cards only. I have probably taken more losses refining my Remodel strategy than I care to admit.

- Lex
 
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Peristarkawan wrote:
weidox wrote:
Note that this deck gets yet another nice power - playing well, you can in the same turn cycle your deck, buy new cards into discard, and with Smithy put those into your hand - and use them in same turn.


Sounds like you might be playing something wrong. You can't buy cards and then play more actions in the same turn. You can, however, gain cards via actions and then play more actions in the same turn.


I was gaining cards via actions (Remodel and Workshop).
 
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LexH wrote:
Hmm.

In theory this kind of thing works, but two things caught my eye.

#1) You got all 10 Villages. Maybe in a 2-player game against an opponent who thinks Villages are dumb.



My first words about deck was"single play", I meant I just tried deck without opponent - and I wrote that this strategy may be interrupted in many ways, a common one (as you just wrote) is other players depleting these precious Villages.
 
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Andrew Hardin
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weidox wrote:
LexH wrote:
Hmm.

In theory this kind of thing works, but two things caught my eye.

#1) You got all 10 Villages. Maybe in a 2-player game against an opponent who thinks Villages are dumb.



My first words about deck was"single play", I meant I just tried deck without opponent - and I wrote that this strategy may be interrupted in many ways, a common one (as you just wrote) is other players depleting these precious Villages.


I like what you are doing with the card combinations. In practice this is a real consideration and would impact the potential of this deck.

Not every game has an Attack card, so in my view it is fair to study deck strategies that do not involve the impact of attack cards. But unless you are playing solo you always have an opponent. Treasure is by rule infinite, but Kingdom cards are limited.

So when somebody says they developed a strategy using 10 Villages that raises questions to me. How does it perform under the restriction of having less Villages?

- Lex
 
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Charles Connaughton
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As a general rule, if you are thinking about buying a Village, you are wrong and should not be buying a Village.

Village (and all of its 3 and 4 cost friends) are not useless, they're just niche. When I have seen them prove useful, they have followed these rules:


1). There is strong deck thinning on the board.

Without pulling a good number of your initial 10 cards out of the deck, you have to spend way too many turns for far too long odds of making your combo work. If you can open and strip a lot of copper out fast with a Chapel, Steward, Ambassador, or the like, you'll be in good shape to hit your combo in the midgame. If you can't, you're looking at a lot of dead draws.


2). They are a midgame buy, not an early game buy.

Some of the newer variants like Shanty Town and Fishing Village push this rule a bit. But the first few turns in a game of Dominion are critical. Getting out the gate fast sets up progressively bigger plays as the game progresses; if you get out the gate slow, you're more likely to be watching while your opponent rides the snowball. A turn 1 Village will literally cripple you the entire game, and turn 3 Village isn't much better. Your first couple passes through the deck need to focus on setting up your economy for the rest of the game, through a combination of deck thinning and buying power. Try to sneak in Villages on weaker hands during the 3rd or 4th time through your deck.


3). Village shines as a late game play.

This should be obvious if you think about it, but it's important to keep it in mind. The main point of a card like Village is to take a bit of a hit in the midgame from buying it, but turning that into one or two really big turns in the later part of the game where you make it up with interest, blasting past your opponent. You aren't aiming for a turn 7 combo that nets you a gold because your economy sucks; you want a turn 10, turn 11 explosion that nets you 2 golds, or a province and a gold, or, slightly later in the game, a province and a duchy. If you aren't making a couple big buys, you aren't doing significantly better than a guy just buying coins the whole time.


Granted, there are some edge cases where Village has proved useful, but those are the exceptions, not the rule. The vast majority of really tight Village plays have followed the above rules.

It's not a useless card by any stretch, but it's definitely not a card you can make perform without careful consideration. In all but the more dedicated combo deck boards, I don't think you can go into a match knowing whether or not you will try for a village burst; it depends so much on how you're positioned relative to your opponents, and how your draws come up turns 5-8 when you're making the buys that will set up the late game.
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Matt Sargent
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cxensign wrote:
As a general rule, if you are thinking about buying a Village, you are wrong and should not be buying a Village.

Village (and all of its 3 and 4 cost friends) are not useless, they're just niche. When I have seen them prove useful, they have followed these rules:

1). There is strong deck thinning on the board.
2). They are a midgame buy, not an early game buy.
3). Village shines as a late game play.


Village replaces itself and gives you an extra action. You buy it and play it when you want to make a deck that will play more than one terminal action per turn.

You don't have to thin your deck to use it, as long as you have powerful enough card draw.

You don't buy a bunch of terminal actions in the early game and then a bunch of villages in the midgame, because then you wouldn't be able to play your terminal actions in the early game. You have to buy both villages and terminal actions at the same time.

Early game, late game, village is great to play whenever you have multiple terminal actions.
 
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David desJardins
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noon wrote:
Early game, late game, village is great to play whenever you have multiple terminal actions.


Only problem with this analysis is it assumes that first you fill your deck up with a bunch of terminal actions, then you look around to figure out how to play them and you settle on Villages.

The problem is that often you shouldn't have bought all of those terminal actions in the first place.
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