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Subject: How many people cheat? rss

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Ian Foutz
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Garland
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This is the newest game in my collection, and my wife and I have been playing it a lot and having a ball with it (even though we're only 1 for 3 on real missions so far after having breezed through the simulations). But with just the two of us, we have found that at least so far, we enjoy the game a little more when we "relax the rules". We play our cards face up, we occasionally allow a change of cards in a previous phase, and we sometimes hit the pause button to give ourselves an extra minute or two to think. So I just wanted to know, does anyone else out there do the same sort of stuff?
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Larry Levy
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I think Space Alert is best when the players are a little frantic and frazzled and things aren't going as planned. This is not a game I want to be easy. It might be different with two players, but with 4 or 5, I wouldn't dream of relaxing the rules; it's the time pressure and the restrictions that make the game so much fun.
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Rami Finkelshtein
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Waterloo
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personally i have no issue with playing face up (play face down to make it a little more complicated) however when it comes to changing previous periods then its a big no no for me. If you make a mistake you still have time to correct it but not change it. And hitting pause is heretical in our group. If you don't like the time constraint just set it up and solve it (like some other co-op games) for me the time constraint is the funnest part of the game.
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Chester
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I dont' have any less fun when we lose the mission. Its the frantic trying that makes it fun. The outcome is almost irrelevant.

We inadvertently cheated by abusing the "I slipped" rule last game. We still took the penalty of having a blank action the following round, but it allowed us to win a mission we probably otherwise would have lost. But our group won't do that again.
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Gordon Adams
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What is the point of cheating ? One is only deceiving oneself into believing "I beat the game but cheated a little in doing so ".shake

I prefer to lose knowing that I am still trying to win, otherwise I would just put the game away.

Kind regards.
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David Vanden Heuvel
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you could argue that it is "practicing". Like playing the piano, you never start out at full tempo.

Poor analogy perhaps, but it doesn't have to be considered cheating
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Ian Foutz
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Yeah, this is how I see it. I feel like I am working up to playing it by the full rules.
 
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Chester
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Its your game, you're free to play it as you see fit. I think trying and getting blown up is also practicing. How will you learn to get your planning up to real-time tempo if you pause it?

The bottom line is that you should play the game to have fun. If cheating is the best way to accomplish that, and all players are agreed to do so...have a good time.
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Adam D.
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"and all players are agreed to do so..."

That's the key line. You're just playing house rules, and who doesn't do that now and then? To me, cheating means getting away with something against the rules other players don't know about or didn't agree to. With solitaire games I suppose it's another matter, unless you agree with yourself ahead of time to take twelve mulligans at any point in the game... devil
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Joe Lott
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As any good player knows:

Loosing is Fun
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niels s
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if it is with the consent of the entire group, i would call it "house rules".

Look on the positive side: You can add a lot more rules to the game then others who go hard core from the beginning.
 
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Christian Wilson
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I don't see anything wrong with relaxing the rules if you're going to have more fun with it.

The two-player version is much more difficult than a 4/5-player session when you're first learning the rules. Right after we bought the game, my wife and I played through several simulations, losing every time. It was fun at first, but became frustrating after our fourth destroyed ship.

We decided to take the serious threat deck out, and just play a simulation with normal threats. We won, which renewed our interest in the game. Since then we've graduated to full missions with some of the hard-level threats/serious threats shuffled in, but I think in our case, relaxing the rules for an "easy" win inspired us to stick with the game.

I do think that if you're going to run a 4/5-player game, you should try to play it straight. Space Alert is a very different experience with a larger group, and even hilarious failure can be extremely fun with the right crowd.
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Daniel Reece
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We have agreed to a house rule here that slightly expands the scope of "tripping" - if you find you played a card a turn earlier than intended then you can intentionally "trip" to delay it a phase (which of course delays following actions).

We got annoyed at the number of deaths to "trivial errors".

Even still, every mission has "the smell of death" on it. You know you
have to play well as a team to stay alive.

When the game difficulty and team skill is well balanced things should "get a little dicey" at about the second threat announcement in phase 2.
Followed by either "wow, I think we did it; picture time" about 30 seconds into phase 3 OR "we are so dead" at about the same time (since all the phase 2 cards are already locked and we realize we screwed up). Running out of time "what do you MEAN end of phase 2!" is almost
always deadly.

Sometimes it goes worse than I expected in the resolution phase, only very rarely better.

We play with continuing characters in our house campaign and as a result are perhaps a bit less tolerant of dying. (We still die a fair amount).

We replay any death as a "bad dream" or "time warp" and it only counts if you die again the second time. Even with that rule we have about a 20% "death rate", after 20 missions I am on my 4th clone.

Even with house trip rules and campaign powerups we still die ~35% of the time. That seems to be enough to make things fun for us.
 
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Brian M
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Its not cheating when everyone playing agrees on the rules!

However, with cooperative games it tends to be more fun to beat the game as you set out to play it - however that is. If you want an easier time, deciding how to make it easier up front and sticking with that is probably more satisfying.

For Space Alert, I might recommend downloading the mission generator and creating some missions with fewer threats. Start low and you can work your way up - a mission with fewer threats will give you a lot more time to think and plan, and make mistakes less devastating.
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Matt Smith
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When teaching a new player, we sometimes pause the CD, or "fix" an errant card. I look at it as an investment, as we use these "oops" moments to show the newbie what he is supposed to do/should of done, which gets him up to speed quicker. A critical mistake in turn 3 of 12 just blows the rest of the mission, and prevents us from showing how proper coordination works. Usually by the 3rd mission, all players feel comfortable enough that they all agree to stick strictly to the rules.
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Evgeni Liakhovich
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I have only been playing with my son so far, We follow the rules by the letter with one exception - if we used a wrong action and we know what we really intended to do (for example when I use a blue arrow when I clearly remember I intended to go red), we fix the action and do not get delayed. Since we don't feel guilty for these simple spatial positioning mistakes, we are ok with this level of cheating.
 
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Jonas Jacobsson
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Glad8r wrote:
I have only been playing with my son so far, We follow the rules by the letter with one exception - if we used a wrong action and we know what we really intended to do (for example when I use a blue arrow when I clearly remember I intended to go red), we fix the action and do not get delayed. Since we don't feel guilty for these simple spatial positioning mistakes, we are ok with this level of cheating.


We do not do this. I actually think it's part of the game to mix up things and makes the game more exciting.

A common mistake we do is to place the card the wrong way, so instead of using an action the player moves to another location.

 
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