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Subject: ArtsCow: RGB/CMYK? rss

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Chris Blakeley
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Having done my fair share of printing other people's work on ArtsCow, I'm about to take a stab at doing my own projects (a deck or two and a canvas). The question now is if it makes a difference whether I send CMYK or RGB files? I've done some searching and not found any answers.

Thanks!
 
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Paul DeStefano
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In general, in the graphics world, RGB is for monitors and CMYK is for print.
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Chris Blakeley
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Yeah, but I've worked with as many print companies (Blurb most notably) where it doesn't really matter one way or the other.

Either way, better safe than sorry
 
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Steve Duff
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Given the focus of Artscow, I'd guess at least 95% of all their customer submissions are in RGB format. Most folks printing up bags and calendars wouldn't even know the difference.

Most (all?) of us doing up game decks have been doing RGB.

But hey, take one for the team and see how it works out.
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Chris Blakeley
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UnknownParkerBrother wrote:
But hey, take one for the team and see how it works out.


SIR YES SIR!!!! Just point me to that live grenade, sir!
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Travis Worthington
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I would say you are safe with RGB and taking a chance with CMYK. They are set up for the casual user, thus expecting to get RGB.
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Ned Ludd
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UnknownParkerBrother wrote:
Most folks printing up bags and calendars wouldn't even know the difference.

Hi.

I am one of these "folks". Any chance you could explain the difference between the RGB and CMYK?

Thank you.
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mark sellmeyer
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CMYK is 4 color process printing, having the 4 colors (cyan, magenta, yellow and black) make up any color combination.

RBG started as a video screen format that 3 colors (red, blue, and green) make up any color combination.
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Carc >> BSG
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RGB is a wider color spectrum. It includes brighter, richer colors because they're based on adding together the three base colors - Red, Green and Blue - like on your computer/television screens.

CMYK is a smaller color spectrum. The colors are produced by mixing Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black (K is the Black in that acronym). Unlike RGB, CMYK is intended for print work - the colors are reflected off of surfaces and absorb all other colors, which is why CMYK is sometimes referred to as a subtractive color scheme and RGB is referred to as an additive color scheme (light of different colors is added together to produce other colors).

Direct comparisons show that CMYK has a smaller selection of blues and greens than RGB. If you produce artwork in RGB mode and have gradient blues and greens you can see those colors get very muddy/grayish/ugly when converted into CMYK.

Found this on printernational.com



Ignore the PANTONE color gamut indicator - the important thing to see is the RGB area vs the CMYK area - you can tell that CMYK is very limited in comparison. BUT - printing is primarily a CMYK (also called 4-color) process, so if you ever decide to print your work professionally you'll need to keep this in mind.
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Travis Worthington
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artmark wrote:
CMYK is 4 color process printing, having the 4 colors (cyan, magenta, yellow and black) make up any color combination.

RBG started as a video screen format that 3 colors (red, blue, and green) make up any color combination.


I have been learning more about this topic than I thought I would need to know. One of the important things is that RGB is a much larger set of colors and much brighter.

Converting between the 2 is not straight forward, true professionals will develop the 2 in parallel rather than converting.

Still looking for a WYSIWYG way to display CMYK. I converted images from RGB to CMYK and it looks good on the screen but not when printed. Laser printers use a ICC color profile to convert what you design in RGB (powerpoint for example) and how laser printers work (CMYK). You can download these ICC profiles and use themt o convert from RGB to CMYK, but still not sure that I can accurately predict what I would get back form a true CMYK print.

 
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Carc >> BSG
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T Worthington wrote:

Still looking for a WYSIWYG way to display CMYK. I converted images from RGB to CMYK and it looks good on the screen but not when printed. Laser printers use a ICC color profile to convert what you design in RGB (powerpoint for example) and how laser printers work (CMYK). You can download these ICC profiles and use themt o convert from RGB to CMYK, but still not sure that I can accurately predict what I would get back form a true CMYK print.


Pre-press shops have monitors that are color-calibrated, but even then what you see on screen is rarely exactly what you see on the printed page. For high-end work the pre-press works with the printer to get press-proof, match proofs, etc., to see if what comes out matches what they put in. Oftentimes there are company specific colors (in logos, for example) that HAVE to match.

Just to provide even more (way too much) info, there's also something called Hexachrome, which is a 6-color process. It's possible to produce a lot more colors this way, including very vibrant oranges and blues. Art posters, theater backlits, etc., would be examples of where you'd want to spend the extra money for hexachrome.
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chris schott
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No printed material is RGB. For print, RGB is always going to be converted to CMYK. Likewise, you are never seeing CMYK on the screen, you are seeing an approximation of CMYK using RGB.
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Krzysiek
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I've printed two (different) decks at ArtsCow - one with graphics done in RGB, the other in CMYK. Both were of equally terrible quality, but the CMYK colors (to my surprise) were actually represented much worse.

Hint: Try to avoid areas of solid colour. My "blue" deck instead of solid blue backs has pinkish stripes and the shadowy shape of the chameleon from Coloretto on aproximately half the cards (and that's not the game I printed...)

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chris schott
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One more thing - your monitor and table top printer are not accurate. To accurately check color, designers always want to see proofs. There are prepress proofs and press checks, but with a digital press they are the same thing. I kind of doubt that an online service provider is going to provide either.
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Doc Bullseye
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ejcarter wrote:

Found this on printernational.com



Ignore the PANTONE color gamut indicator - the important thing to see is the RGB area vs the CMYK area - you can tell that CMYK is very limited in comparison. BUT - printing is primarily a CMYK (also called 4-color) process, so if you ever decide to print your work professionally you'll need to keep this in mind.


Uh...so my monitor is displaying colors that are outside its color space? WTF?
 
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Carc >> BSG
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KnobDoctor wrote:
ejcarter wrote:

Found this on printernational.com



Ignore the PANTONE color gamut indicator - the important thing to see is the RGB area vs the CMYK area - you can tell that CMYK is very limited in comparison. BUT - printing is primarily a CMYK (also called 4-color) process, so if you ever decide to print your work professionally you'll need to keep this in mind.


Uh...so my monitor is displaying colors that are outside its color space? WTF?


Don't bogie it, dude, pass it around.
 
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