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Subject: Few questions about miniature painting... rss

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Bruno Legzdins
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1. Could you suggest me some free beginners manuals for miniature painting ? At least a step-by-step guide would be very nice.

2. Is it possible to use some cheaper paint substitute for painting ?
For now i'm considering using nail polish instead of special miniature paint, as it's cheaper and girls say it's rather good for painting plastic.
Or shouldn't i be such a cheapskate and buy the special miniature paint only ?
 
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dustin boggs
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There is lots of good forums on painting minis. Do not be a cheapskate and buy some decent or good paints. Tamiya or valejo are my current favorites. Tamiya is super smooth and valejo has really thick pigments (coverers really well)

The cheaper craft store type paints are thicker but if you thin them they will not cover as well. They are good for stuff like terrain where some of the details arent as important but on miniatures they will fill in some details
 
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Pete Belli
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This excellent GeekList called "The DIP Method" might be helpful:

http://www.boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/43744
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James Boardgame
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Just to put in a word for being a cheapskates and settling for cheap paints. I had always wondered if there was any difference between artshop acryllics and modelling acryllics other than price. A lot of discount stores in the UK sell packs of 12 tubes of acryllic paint, at prices from as little as 99p. Seeing this finally tempted me back into miniatures painting after a 20 year hiatus. I used to paint with Citadel paints mostly, and whilst I am prepared to believe that specialist paints are better today than 20 years ago, I found that the cheap paints I bought this time around have serve just fine. Sure, some paints seem better than others (the white needed quite a few coats) and I am sure that for people who take the hobby seriously it is always worth the extra investment to get the best results - but there is not a world of difference between them, especially for the amateur.

For me the economic factor was the decider - for just under £10 I bought 6 fine & 6 rough brushes, 12 tubes paint, and had enough left over for a jar of Citadel metallic paint and a small jar of matte varnish. With these I took the plunge and finally painted the minis for my Talisman game, with results I am personally very happy with. I'll probably pick up the odd bottle of specialist paint here and there as I carry on with my newly rediscovered hobby, but I certainly have the cheap paints (and nylon brushes) to thank for getting me back into this lark.

Go ahead and buy the cheap stuff if it gets you started, and upgrade when you can afford it. You'll also have the advantage then of knowing for yourself how much better you find the more expensive materials.
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Brad Wagnon
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Are you planning on painting plastic figures, or metal? If the figures are plastic, are they a stiff plastic, or do they bend?

Nail polish is not a good paint for miniatures. It is too glossy, and is not easy to clean off brushes.

Look into acrylic paints. These are water based, and very easy to clean off brushes and you hands. Take my word for it, you will be happy for easy clean up.

Be sure to clean your figures before you paint them. Some figures have oils on them.

Also, look into a good primer for your figures. The colors will look better, and tend to be more durable with proper priming.

Hope these tips help.


Edit: Added the following.

Be sure to get decent quality brushes. You don't need super expensive brushes, but get something from the art supply store, if you can. Nylon multimedia brushes with a good sharp tip will help you get paint in the right places, and tend to last longer.

Acrylic craft paints work OK. Expensive brand name paints tend to work a little better, but as the above poster points out, your results with cheap acryllic paint will still look good, and you can upgrade paints as your budget allow.

Finally, be sure to invest in some clear matte varnish. I prefer spray cans to brushed on. But, you can decide what best fits your budget.
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Dan Fielding
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>you can buy a set of testors acryl for about 10 bucks that has 1 dozen colors in it.

Huh? Maybe you mean their Pla Enamel, which sucks for brushing.
 
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Dan Fielding
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The MODEL MASTER ACRYL line costs several $$$ a bottle:
http://www.testors.com/category/136645/Acryl_Paints

Your link is something else; I don't think its ACRYL in smaller pots or they would advertise it as such.
 
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Tom
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I like Reaper Master and pro series paints because of how they flow on surfaces. Citadel paints have better coverage, but after extend use the pots tend to get really thick and sticky and need to be thinned out. A really good book on painting that helped me make huge strides is the painting book by citadel. Lots of great in detail step by step illustrations. They do use their own paint line in the book but that does not force you to buy what you like. However, I agree don't skimp on paint. There are several pro award winning painters that go to Hobby Lobby or Mike's to buy bulk cheap paint. However, they mix, thin, and add flow control to the paint. This mixing process is not easy nor consistent so I think it is better to buy quality paint that holds up over time.

Also, I would avoid the dip and use washes (citadel makes a great line) instead. More forgiving and more control. Certainly, dipping is quicker so if you still wish to us the dip try the lighter colors first.

http://www.games-workshop.com/gws/catalog/productDetail.jsp?...

Have fun it is a great hobby and you can mod your boardgames to your liking.
 
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John Desmond
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Salutations, gentlefolk !

A while back I wrote up my thoughts and uploaded them to
http://fanaticus.org/DBA/guides/Painting/paintingdesmond.htm...

Needs an updating, but mayhaps you will still find it useful. My recommendations on 'craft paints' are there.

Much more of interest is at fanaticus.org - the 'Everything for fans of _De Bellis Antiquitatis_' website - click 'Resources' from the opening page, then 'Tips and Guides' or 'Eye Candy'.

Yours, John Desmond
 
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Kyle Hough
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Most everything I'v learned about painting I've learned from this site: http://www.paintingclinic.com/
 
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Dan Fielding
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An article on painting with art markers then dipping:

http://theminiaturespage.com/workbench/424475/

 
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Christian Jorgensen
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A word on brushes. You don"t have to get super expensive ones, but what ever you do, look after them well. If you do this they will last a lot longer, and be easier to use. I still use a couple of brushes that I got nearly 8 years ago.

Some simple tips are.

ALWAYS wash them well after each use. There is nothing like dried paint to bugger up a good brush.

After you wash them reform the tip. This goes a long way towards helping the brush keep its shape.

If you get brushes that come with the little plastic tip guard always put it back on after you use the brush. Again this helps look after the tip.

Don't expect one brush to be able to do everything. Different painting techniques need different brushes. For example dry brushing needs a different type of brush from detail work. I'll use three or four (depending on the mini) on each figure I paint.

Try and get the minimal amount of paint on the brust that you need at that time. For example, don't dip the brushes right in if all you need is a tiny bit of paint on the tip for detail work. As a side point, getting paint in the ferrule (metal bit that holds the bristles) will kill your brushes. When it dries it causes the bristles to splay out.

Hope this helps.
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Semigall wrote:
1. Could you suggest me some free beginners manuals for miniature painting ? At least a step-by-step guide would be very nice.


I've listed a bunch of very helpful websites for beginning painters here:

http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/408909

 
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Dan Fielding
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>If you get brushes that come with the little plastic tip guard always put it back on

Sable needs to dry out first. And use brush soap; sometimes use hair conditioner to keep the natural oils in the bristles.
 
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