Travis Worthington
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I have my art in gimp, printed cards at superiorpod.com, but the results were not up to my satisfaction.

I am going to be self producing the game, and have great feedback from playtesters on both the gameplay and art work (when I have printed on laser printer and hand cut the cards!).

I don't want to hand cut 70+ decks (after doing over 30 already!

Respond or geekmail and I can send details, I don't think its a huge effort but what do I know?

 
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Hank Panethiere
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Have you looked into www.artscow.com. They have coupons for custom decks quite often $4.99 last time I printed some, and since your deck is 27 cards you can print two decks at once because each custom deck includes 54 cards. The cards are standard size if that matters.

Which art did you get the better feedback on...I liked the first card art better (I liked the less abstract look)...but the new art is good as well.

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Travis Worthington
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metalchorus wrote:
Have you looked into www.artscow.com. They have coupons for custom decks quite often $4.99 last time I printed some, and since your deck is 27 cards you can print two decks at once because each custom deck includes 54 cards. The cards are standard size if that matters.

Which art did you get the better feedback on...I liked the first card art better (I liked the less abstract look)...but the new art is good as well.



Artscow cards aren't that durable or that good for shuffling.
 
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Andrew Tullsen
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Guild of Blades does some Print on Demand Card stuff.
 
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Greg CZ
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artscow cards: I use card protectors and they are fine.
 
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Isaiah Tanenbaum
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I can convert any RGB image to CMYK in Photoshop. Send me a geekmail if you're interested.
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Tim Harrison
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leaxe wrote:
artscow cards: I use card protectors and they are fine.


Perhaps for a protoype, but he wants to sell them.
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Tim Harrison
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The primary problem isn't converting them from RGB to CMYK. It's making sure they will look good after they are converted, and that takes a well-calibrated monitor, something I suspect only graphic professionals might have.
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Travis Worthington
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GamesOnTheBrain wrote:
leaxe wrote:
artscow cards: I use card protectors and they are fine.


Perhaps for a protoype, but he wants to sell them.


GamesOnTheBrain wrote:
The primary problem isn't converting them from RGB to CMYK. It's making sure they will look good after they are converted, and that takes a well-calibrated monitor, something I suspect only graphic professionals might have.


right on both points!
 
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Dan Norder
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Graphic professionals know not to trust what the monitor displays no matter how much work they put into calibrating it, as the color range that monitors are even capable of displaying and what printers can print reliably only slightly overlap. On top of that you have to account for the dot gain and loss of the ink (anything that looks near white or near black on a monitor will switch to complete white and complete black after being printed) as well as making sure you don't try to lay down too much ink into the same area (there are several different percentages of the CMYK inks that in theory should result in the same color, but if there's too much ink total it will not dry reliably).

The exact same file with the exact same specs can produce different shades of colors based upon whichever way the printer is set up, which is completely outside of your control. All the calibrating in the world on the designers end means nothing if you don't know how the printer is calibrated.

That said, I've done a fair amount of work prepping color covers for books produced at the U.S. and U.K.'s largest POD company. Some of that knowledge would apply to all POD systems, and the part that doesn't isn't going to be anything anyone else has more experience with unless they've dealt with superiorpod.com in the past.
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Isaiah Tanenbaum
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dannorder wrote:
Graphic professionals know not to trust what the monitor displays no matter how much work they put into calibrating it, as the color range that monitors are even capable of displaying and what printers can print reliably only slightly overlap. On top of that you have to account for the dot gain and loss of the ink (anything that looks near white or near black on a monitor will switch to complete white and complete black after being printed) as well as making sure you don't try to lay down too much ink into the same area (there are several different percentages of the CMYK inks that in theory should result in the same color, but if there's too much ink total it will not dry reliably).

The exact same file with the exact same specs can produce different shades of colors based upon whichever way the printer is set up, which is completely outside of your control. All the calibrating in the world on the designers end means nothing if you don't know how the printer is calibrated.


All of this is true. I can only offer what I have, which is a good monitor with a huey calibrator and plenty of experience designing and prepping postcards and the like for my theater company. But yes, ultimately the best I (or anyone) can do is convert and adjust an image before sending it to the printer. Most printers worth their salt will offer you a printed proof, however, after which adjustments can be made if need be.
 
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Maarten D. de Jong
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T Worthington wrote:
I have my art in gimp, printed cards at superiorpod.com, but the results were not up to my satisfaction.

Several experts have already weighed in on the subject, so as a small amateur I have no right of speaking, but still I'm going to as I haven't seen this particular angle yet. Any conversion from RGB to CMYK will involve loss of all sorts of colours, and while a professional might be able to coax a bit more out of the systems doing the actual conversion, the result will never be satisfactory. This is inherent to the colour models, and cannot be circumvented: doing so would more or less be the equivalent of succeeding in letting 1 + 1 = 3 all of a sudden.

So how to get beautiful prints? Well, CMYK only uses 4 colours. There is no law which states you cannot use more. All of a sudden more combinations spring up; colours which cannot be approximated well by CMYK suddenly are there in full glory; and more. You can read up on a number of such techniques here. Unfortunately, the systems mentioned there truly are for the professional only, with matching prices. But until we figure out how to print in a RGB colour space (which would be Nobel-prize winning work indeed), it's the best we can do.

As for calibrated monitors: while a good monitor can certainly give a good indication of what the image will eventually look like, I found it is far more important to have software which does the hard work of colour management on its own. I gave up on calibrating my monitor a long time ago (there's all sorts of weird stuff conflicting on OS level), and when I compare the output of my cheapo colour laser printer to that of rather generic colour management on my computer screen, the difference is too small for me to worry about. I get a very good idea of what the result will be, and that is sufficient. A professional would go the extra mile, of course, but then he is paid to do that.
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