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Subject: Lovecraft books and short stories rss

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Victor
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I'm wondering if anyone knows which stories or books to read for each of the expansions, or perhaps for each of the Great Old Ones, heck I'd love to hear any recommendations for any of the stories which relate to something in the game.

I've already read some of them, translated into swedish:
The Dunwich Horror, Call of Cthulhu, Herbert West Re-animator, The Festival, The Whisperer in Darkness(only read a few pages so far) and The Colour out of Space.

I've recently gotten the king in yellow but haven't read story related to it which I'd like to do to really be able to immerse myself in the concept storywise and how it relates to game mechanics.
 
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Alex

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Most of the material for Arkham Horror is much more closely inspired by the Call of Cthulhu RPG than from anything directly Lovecraftian.

However, here are some Lovecraft tales that should not be missed:

At The Mountains of Madness (Elder Things, Shoggoths)
The Shadow Out of Time (Yithians, Flying Polyps)
The Shadow Over Innsmouth (Deep Ones)
The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath (Dreamlands, Gods and tons of creatures)
The Case of Charles Dexter Ward

All of those are very good.

For the King in Yellow, you should perhaps read The King In Yellow, by Robert W. Chambers. That is where Lovecraft and others took the general ideas.
 
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Dana R.
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I have found: "Tales of the Cthulhu Mythos" shortstories by Lovecraft and many others to be very mood setting.

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Bryan Maxwell
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Lurker at the Threshold was good. Slow paced, but enjoyable.
 
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Alex

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Mr_Nuts wrote:
Lurker at the Threshold was good. Slow paced, but enjoyable.


Not really Lovecraft, though. I think he wrote about 2% of that book's text. The rest is August Derleth.
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Play Games - Interact - Have Fun!
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The Shadow over Innsmouth was a very good read. It was tense, creepy and the story was top notch.
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Victor
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Ah, it's good to know I haven't read the really good stories yet, even though I like what I've read most of it hasn't been all that scary

I should have written 'Lovecraftian books and short stories' tho, because I don't really mind if it's another author than lovecraft

The King in Yellow, you say "That is where Lovecraft and others took the general ideas." is there an actual cthulhu mythos book that reference him more than briefly?, not necessarily by lovecraft himself.
 
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Alex

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Lovecraft never wrote any stories about Hastur or the King in Yellow, or about Shub-Niggurath, or about any Great Old One for that matter (except Cthulhu and a few others like Nyarlatothep). He used them mainly to add a continuity between stories, a sort of "realism", that would be lacking otherwise.

If you're interested by tales from other authors, there are many anthologies that deal with specific aspects of the Mythos, such as these.

That said, while most Mythos stories are interesting and entertaining, I feel no other author comes close to Lovecraft for quality of writing, imagination and atmosphere.

If you want to read his tales in english, you can do so here.


Quote:
Ah, it's good to know I haven't read the really good stories yet, even though I like what I've read most of it hasn't been all that scary


Out of curiosity, what books have you read and found actually scary? I probably never read any, in truth, but for my part, I find Lovecraft extremely competent in creating a sense of dread and abnormality that makes for some great horror literature.
 
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Ed Browne
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1. (Curse of the Dark Pharoah) "Dreams of the Witch House" Nyarlathotep may be the "dark man" mentioned by Lovecraft in stories like this.

2. (Dunwich Horror). "The Dunwich Horror." One of my favorites. You'll recognize lots of locations and people in that one.

3. (King in Yellow). Mostly used by other authors. And something transported into the mythos from other horror sources, I believe.

4. (Kingsport). Just a town mentioned in some stories.

5. (Black Goat of the Woods). Again, other authors.

6. (Innsmouth) "Shadow Over Innsmouth." Great story.

Another recommendation for anyone who loves Arkham Horror is "The Shunned House" which most closely feels like an Arkham Horror adventure. Investigators finds weird stuff happening at a house, portal to another dimension in fireplace, rig up science stuff to close portal.

"Whisperer in Darkness" is a good introduction to the Mi-Go.

And, of course, "Call of Cthulhu" in which the Ancient One actually awakens...and promptly gets hit in the head with a boat, thus knocking him out for another few years...

"The Strange Case of Charles Dexter Ward." Just good stuff.

"At the Mountains of Madness" is pretty good, too. Guillermo del Toro (Hellboy) started working on a movie version until he got taken away to do "The Hobbit" and the movie set between "The Hobbit" and "The Lord of the Rings."

On a side note, check out Edgar Allen Poe's only novel length story "The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym or Nantucket." Predates "At the Mountains of Madness" by almost 100 years, but H.P. Lovecraft borrowed heavily from it for his story, including the "Tekeli-li" chant.

As someone else stated, Arkham Horror is based on Chaosium's (great) RPG "Call of Cthulhu" and not just Lovecraft directly. CoC is made up of adventures in the Cthulhu Mythos invented by Lovecraft. Richard Launius's original "Arkham Horror" boardgame was based on the RPG, but he has as much love for HP as anyone else.
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Otavio Rofatto
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I've read some short stories too and also would love to correlate each entity from the game to one or more stories...

I've read Curse of Yig here: http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Curse_of_Yig

I don't know if anywhere else Lovecraft talk about it, but you should definately read "The Outsider". Not really a surprising end, but a great way to get to know Ghouls
 
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James Barnes
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I don't know about a Swedish translation, but the Library of America edition of "H.P. Lovecraft: Tales" is a great collection of his works. I finished Colour Out of Space last night, and it mentions the Gardner Place and the Blasted Heath. I found it interesting that they were in Dunwich, since the story did not mention Dunwich at all.
 
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Victor
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Scipio23 wrote:
I don't know about a Swedish translation, but the Library of America edition of "H.P. Lovecraft: Tales" is a great collection of his works. I finished Colour Out of Space last night, and it mentions the Gardner Place and the Blasted Heath. I found it interesting that they were in Dunwich, since the story did not mention Dunwich at all.


That's probably just some creative freedom from the gamemakers, or perhaps the makers of the RPG.

But that makes the Dunwich expansion seem alot more interesting to me though as I really liked the mood and feeling of that story
 
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Darrell Pavitt
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Quote:
(Kingsport). Just a town mentioned in some stories.


Kingsport turns up in "The terrible old man" and "The strange high house in the mist"

Some other good ones are "The horror in the museum" (Rhan Tegoth) and "The mound" (Formless spawn), as well as other writers such as Clark Ashton Smith ("The seven Geases").

You might also try Brian Lumley (Titas Crow), although his early writings are, erm, not very good.
 
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Bob T
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jellospike wrote:
Lovecraft never wrote any stories about Hastur or the King in Yellow, or about Shub-Niggurath, or about any Great Old One for that matter (except Cthulhu and a few others like Nyarlatothep). He used them mainly to add a continuity between stories, a sort of "realism", that would be lacking otherwise.

.


As far as I know, of all the Old Ones only Great Cthulhu makes an actual appearance in a Lovecraft story.

Hope the atmosphere comes through in the Swedish translation, Viktor/Seiseki. HPL had a vocabulary all his own which might be lost in the translation. A really "old" or archaic style of English. Words such as "Cyclopean" or "Eldritch", words that no one else ever uses.
 
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Alex

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Thoth Amon wrote:
As far as I know, of all the Old Ones only Great Cthulhu makes an actual appearance in a Lovecraft story.


I can also think of Nyarlathotep in The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath and possibly Yog-Sothoth in Through the Gates of the Silver Key.

Also, Nodens.
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Ed Browne
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jellospike wrote:
Thoth Amon wrote:
As far as I know, of all the Old Ones only Great Cthulhu makes an actual appearance in a Lovecraft story.


I can also think of Nyarlathotep in The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath and possibly Yog-Sothoth in Through the Gates of the Silver Key.

Also, Nodens.


Yog-Sothoth features prominently in "The Dunwich Horror."

"He has his father's eyes..."
 
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Craig Rose
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I have found The Cthulhu Mythos Encyclopedia to be an invaluable resource for information. This is not a collection of stories, but a reference guide.

It was originally released as the Encyclopedia Cthulhiana. However, now that the 3rd edition released under the new name, it is readily available and is relatively inexpensive.

I keep the book with my copy of AH, as there is always someone who will ask where a particular character or AO originated.

 
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Bob T
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jellospike wrote:
Thoth Amon wrote:
As far as I know, of all the Old Ones only Great Cthulhu makes an actual appearance in a Lovecraft story.


I can also think of Nyarlathotep in The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath and possibly Yog-Sothoth in Through the Gates of the Silver Key.

Also, Nodens.


Believe it or not, I haven't read those two stories yet. This'll tell you something about my personality;

I first got hooked on HPL in the early 90s, but I haven't read all his stories yet- I'm "saving" some (as I do with the Sherlock Holmes stories) for later, even YEARS later when I really need a Lovecraft "fix". (Cause he ain't writing no new stories, for obvious reasons...)

Last "new" HPL story I read was "Horror at Red Hook" about 4 years ago...correction, the "Crawling Chaos" a few months after "Red Hook"...

...anyway, I PLANNED it out, anticipated it, pondered what the "Horror at Red Hook" might be LONG before I opened the pages for the first time.

And it wasn't one of his best stories either. Turns out I'd already read all his "blockbusters" like "Cthulhu" Imagine if I'd skipped "The Colour out of Space" or "Dreams in the Witch House", saved one of them for later and got to read it tonight for the first time...
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Alex

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Kadath is definitely worth reading.

Oh, and you're weird.
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