Colin Hunter
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Introduction
I played this game solo. I rarely play games seriously solo, I generally do it to learn the rules. However I decided to make a special effort with this game for a number of reasons. Firstly I had in mind doing a session report with some photos of the play (ok I admit I'm trying to earnGG for my uberbadge). Secondly I wanted to get better at judging games when playing solo. Many wargamers seem to be able to tell quite a bit about a game from playing solo. I am not one of them. So I decided to try and take playing the game as seriously as I could in order to teach myself how to play solo well.

Overview

For those that are unfamiliar, Chandragupta is the thirteenth game in the the Great Battles of History series from GMT. These are tactical level games covering various historical periods. Chandragupta is a medium complexity wargame that takes between 3-6 hours to play depending on what scenario you play. Chandragupta was the founder of the Mauryan empire.

Chandragupta (the game) features battles involved in the rise of the Mauryan empire (8 distinct battles), which would eventually consist of a truly sprawling empire consisting of Most of present day India, Pakistan and part of Afghanistan.

This battle that takes place on the banks of the Indus near Gandhara was historically a tactical draw, although Seleucus was forced out of the Indus valley, never to return, so the Mauryans effectively won in a strategic sense. The battle took place in 304BC. It features the might of the phalanx and cavalry against cataphract elephants, chariots, light infantry and a small contingent of cavalry.

Photo - Me punching and setting up the scenario



Initial Disposition and Thoughts

The Battlefield

Gandhara is a large set piece battle in what is basically a flat plain. To the back of the Seleucids however is the Indus river and its muddy banks. This will limit somewhat the ability of the Seleucids to withdraw effectively as well as limiting their back line manoeuvre somewhat. However given that they are not deployed in massive depth, I'm not thinking this will be too much of a problem. The retreat aspect may prove a little bit of a hassle as routing units could be more likely to route through other units, but good tactical sense should prevent this somewhat. The main factor here will actually be an edge of the map problem. The map is really quite narrow for the amount of troops on each side, especially for the Mauryans (under Chandragupta). This means that the Mauryans, which are deployed several lines deep, will find it harder to take advantage of their significant numerical superiority.

Here is a photo of the initial troop dispositions, Mauryans in yellow and the Seleucids in blue and some red (you will notice I am using the optional rule to replace some of the greek hoplites with phalanxes).


Command and Control

The Seleucids have a fairly typical command and control system, basically they have several commander who are activated normally. Tleplemus is the exception, he basically only commands the skirmish screen (which includes a few elephant units and light infantry as well). The rest of the commanders can order who ever they like. This should give the Seleucids plenty of flexibility, but it will also limit their ability to control all their troops. Seleucus is a pretty solid commander with and initiative of 6, the rest are 3s, 4s and 5s. Overall a solid, but typical command structure.

The Mauryans on the other had have a much more complex command structure. While Seleucus has a mere 4 generals under him, Chandragupta has an astounding 12 commanders under him. Many of these are Nayakas (sub-commanders), but he still boasts 3 wing commanders, 1 subordinate commander and 2 tribal chiefs. The result should be that the Mauryans will have a distinct advantage when it to ordering all of their troops, but they may not have the same flexibility in terms of ordering everything all the time, they will be able to move far more units, when issuing line commands and orders. They also can probably afford to take more risks when trumping, as they have tons of commanders.

So two distinct command structures, my intuition tells me that the Mauryan multi-fold command system will have the advantage here, but we shall see.

Photo - Seleucus Surveys his troops before the battle


The Troops

The Seleucids have a real advantage in heavy infantry. The Mauryans have none and boast only a small handful of medium infantry. The phalanx, hoplites and hypaspists are the best weapon the Seleucids have and among the few units that will effectively be able to deal with the Mauryan Elephants. The Seleucids also have a significant cavalry advantage, sporting excellent heavy cavalry, as well as plenty of light cavalry and lancers. However they have almost no elephants and light infantry. In most games this wouldn't be huge, but seeing as light infantry are pretty decent counter to elephants and elephants a decent counter to cavalry, they may well run into problems. The Seleucids do have a small skirmish screen including a small amount of elephants and light infantry. If they are lucky they may be able to use this to there advantage in damaging some the waves of incoming elephants. Missile armed infantry is particularly good against them (as elephants take double hits from missile weapons).

Photo - Seleucid Centre overlooking the Mauryan centre. Notice I replaced the two of the hoplites with phalanx, as per the optional rules.


The Mauryans have an impressive array of troops. While technically slighty worse in quality, they have a significant advantage in numbers and they feature such monstrosity as cataphract elephants and heavy chariots. The trick will be for the Mauryans to bring their elephants to bear against the Seleucids. The elephants will absolutely paste the the cavalry, but the cavalry can withdraw against advancing elephants. The Mauryans also have tons of light infantry which while no match for heavy infantry can certainly wear away at heavy infantry and threated cavalry.

Photo - The light infantry centre of Mauryans


Rout Points
The Seleucids will withdraw if they accumulate 165 Rout Points. The Mauryans will withdraw if they accumulate 155 Rout Points. However my guess is the Mauryans are still favoured in this (purely intuition), at least for a beginner player, so I imagine if I can keep the Seleucids to within 50 RPs of Mauryans I'll be happy.

The Dispositions

The Seleucids are strong in the centre, where most of their heavy infantry is. They do however only have a single line of infantry and so are not particularly deep. Their right flank, has heavy and light cavalry (which are a pretty strong combination) as well as the best of the skirmish line forces (elephants and light infantry) and the hypapists, the flank has plenty of depth. From what I can tell this is the stronger flank. The left flank features light cavalry and lancer cavalry in two lines. So again some depth on the flanks. They have a very thin skirmish line, but I suspect this will get brushed aside pretty easily.

The Mauryans are broadly spread into three lines. One line of elephants, chariots and cavalry and two of light infantry. They also have tribal forces on the flanks, which are rather poor in quality, but may prove useful for annoyance value.

Photo - Another shot of the middle of the line


The Plan

The Seleucid Plan

The plan for the Seleucids is to use an opaque line. That is to withdraw on one flank and push on the other. I rate the chances of the Seleucid's left flank as very poor. They must overcome both cavalry and elephants with purely cavalry. While light cavalry is normally excellent against elephants, the cataphract elephants are almost immune to archer fire and this seems like a tough proposition, so the plan is to stall and do as much damage on the left as possible, while not directly confronting the Mauryan advance.

The centre phalanx will hold position, waiting for the Mauryan centre to over extend before attacking. I'm quite worried about being flanked if they advance too early, so I want to hold them back for a turn or two. This may be a mistake as they are the strongest part of the seleucid force, but we shall see on that. I am going to let the hypapists be detached from the infantry line to help with the elephant menace on the right flank.

The Mauryan Plan

The plan is to divert cavalry and chariots from the centre to attack both flanks hard. The infantry will move up and eventually harass the heavy infantry into attacking. Ideally once the flanks are dealt with the centre will be surrounded and destroyed. So basically, double envelopment. I will clear a path on the right flank, scattering the skirmishers for the advance from the elephants. On the left I will use the tribal units to engage the other light units, creating space for chariots and elephants to destroy their cavalry. Once space on the fanks has been secured it should be possible to flank the centre.

Photo - Another view of the pre-game board position


Turn One

The first turn is rather uneventful. The Seleucid left withdraws as planned, the centre angles to protect the advancing right and withdrawing left.

On the other side, the Mauryan cavalry, using momentum scatters the skirmishers on the right in order to open a whole of the elephants to move up. Also they present themselves as a tasty target for both Infantry and Seleucid Cavalry. This is intentional, as an attack now, by the seleucids, would almost certainly be flanked and crushed, by elephants.

A photo of the cavalry after dispersing the skirmishers. You can see Chandragupta nearby hanging out with the elephants.




Seleucus doesn't respond yet and ignores the minor loss of a few skirmisher units.

Rout Point totals
Seleucids 8 (4 skirmishers)
Mauryans 0


So little action at the end of turn one, here is the board position.


Turn Two

Turn two is where things begin to happen.

Firstly the tribal units on both Mauryan flanks advance. These troops are rather poor, but they are useful for tying down units so more powerful units can be brought to bare. The units on the right simply advance, but the tribal light infantry on the left manages to engage some of the mercenary Indian Seleucid forces. While once of units breaks, damage is inflicted to several other units and they have forced the light cavalry back.

In the centre, the Mauryan light infantry advances in order to try and force the hoplites to attack and expose themselves. The hoplites and phalanxes stoically ignore the rather ineffective fire from a few javelins, holding their position.

What remains of the skirmishers (which is not a lot) counter attack and break another tribal unit on the Seleucid right. Mauryan Chariots stream forth, breaking some light infantry and inflicting hits on a mercentary elephant units, causing it to rampage, doing a little damage to some heavy Seleucid infantry before it is brought down. The hypapist heavy infantry counter attack destroying an engaged chariot and threaten some of the elephants.

On the Mauryan right flank, the Cavalry and elephants continue to advance. A few cavalry units even manage to engage with the Seleucid cavalry, generally coming off second best, but tying them down. This puts the Seleucids in a real bind, if they ignore this, the Mauryans will advance their elephants and overcome their pinned cavalry. If they can break the already tired Mauryan cavalry, they may be able to break them before the elephants can advance and finish them, if not the Seleucid left will be in even bigger trouble and so Chandragupta sets the trap.

Photo - Chandragupta waiting in reserve with the elephant corps.


In some ways it is an impossible problem for the Seleucids, so they throw caution to the wind and advance hoping to break the Mauryan cavalry. Results form combat are poor as not as much cavalry as can engage as I was hoping. While some units do break, several manage to hold, this will be a problem in the forthcoming turn.


Generally the speaking the Seleucids held up alright in this turn, but there is a lot of danger looming. Amazingly the Mauryan tribals didn't withdraw this turn.

Rout Points
Seleucid 44
Mauryan 22

A look at part of the Seleucid dead pile


Here is the picture at the end of the turn Two/Beginning of turn three


Turn Three

At this stage, action must be taken, by the Seleucids, as both flanks are under immense pressure, but first the Mauryans spring into action. The tribals on the left try to rally, but fail and the infantry continues to harass the centre, this time doing a single cohesion hit shake, it appears the phalanx and hoplites have little to fear.

The Skirmish Commander for the Seleucids tries to rally a few units and also orders some skirmishers forward to try and hurt some of the cataphract elephants, but to no avail.

One of the reserve elephant commanders for the Mauryans orders the elephants forward, catching several engaged cavalry units on the Mauryan left flank. Needless to say, the elephants demolish the cavalry breaking several units. Amazingly the commander succeeds his first momentum and the Seleucid's central commander fails to trump, finishing him and the elephants continue to advance, scattering cavalry in their wake.

Seleucus manages to trump the Elephant commander (after he made a second momentum), putting an end to the rampage. Seleucus charges forward with some infantry and causes an unit elephant to rampage and destroys another chariot. Seleucus, then succeeds at attaining momentum and orders some of the phanxes forward to engage the centre of the Mauryan and goes back to rally some of the fleeing cavalry. The resulting fight between the phalanxes and light infantry sees some good reaction fire from the light infantry, but they are hard pressed in combat, but they largely hold. He Succeeds at his second momentum, but is trumped, buy Chandragupta.

Chandragupta launches his deadly cataphract elephants forward. The light cavalry retire and harass the elephants, but the thick armour on the elephants makes them close to immune to the small bows of the horse archers, except at closest of ranges. The elephants push back the line of seleucid cavalry, on the Mauryan right. They also rout several engaged cavalry units and the others who are unable to escape. Chandragupta goes for momentum, but fails.

Sybritius on the same flank takes the initiative and manages to rally some fleeing troops and reorganize a line, his momentum fails.

Photo- Cavalry withdraws



Sakatala, commander of Mauryan left pushes his cataphract elephants and chariots forward. A small gap has been opened in the Seleucid left and Sakatala, ruthlessly exploits it. Two cataphract elephants manage to get in behind the Seleucid heavy cavalry, leaving them no where to go, they are quickly destroyed. This is a disaster as several heavy cavalry units are destroyed and several more surrounded. A single chariot unit manages to chase down some just rallied units. Seleucus himself is seen at the thick of the fighting, but is wounded in the struggle and is forced to flee with the disorganized cavalry.


While the Seleucids only lost a few more units, their position is verging on untenable. Both flanks are beginning to collapse and while the attack in the centre, is making progress it is in danger of being flanked. The fate of Seluecus hangs in the balance, wounded and his army tired, can he make on last push? The only good news is the Mauryan tribals on the left flank rout and leave the battlefield, a small consolation.

Photo - Position at the end of turn 3 (beginning of turn 4)


Rout Points
Seleucids - 120
Mauryans - 44

Turn Four

First up the Mauryan Nayaka in charge of the Centre infantry pushes a few infantry through a whole in the line to flank one of the greek hoplite units. It is quickly overcome and routes, but the light infantry suffers significant disorganization. Momentum is obtained and more units are moved into flanking positions.

The elephant commander on the Mauryan left, then orders his units forward, Mopping up the Seleucid heavy cavalry and repositioning some stragglers.

Patrocles, pushes his phalanx and hoplites on against the lightly armed infantry. He succeeds in breaking a few of the light infantry units, but is wounded in the ensuing combat, the second Seleucid commander to be wounded. He fails his momentum.

The infantry Nayakas in the centre largely pass in hope of Chandragupta that chandragupta and his reserve will make more headway in the flank of the phalanx units. However one of them sends some infantry forward to fill the gaps made, by routing light infantry.

Ghosa rallies a few of the fleeing cavalry broken, by the counter attack in the previous turn, but fails his momentum.

It is at this stage that Polyarchus us activated. He tries to shore up the fleeing cavalry, but is only partly successful, with his momentum he reforms the line. Sibytius activates the remaining light cavalry, one of which actually manages to do damage to one of the cataphract elephant units, doing two cohesion hits. However is he is trumped by Sakatala, who plunges the cataphract elephants, chariots and cavalry into the remaining hypapists.

Photo - the end of the Seleucid right flank


The units are easily destroyed, Sakatala fails his momentum and allows a reactivation. Without hesitation Patrocles seizes the initiative and pushes with his phalanx, breaking a few more light infantry.

The action shifts to the right as the elephants continue to push the flank back, harassing fire from the light cavalry has little effect. Eventually they are cornered and the conflict comes to its inevitable and brief conclusion, the Seleucid cavalry is routed from the map.

Photo - Out of room, the cavalry must fight.


Subandhu tries for momentum, but is trumped, by Seleucus allowing Polyarchus and Sibrytius a final reprieve. Seleucus musters his remaining phalanxes and pushes in the centre. More light infantry breaks, but the fresh troops from last turn hold.

Photo - Phalanxes ordered forward


Seleucus goes for momentum, but is trumped, by Chandragupta. Chandragupta gathers his forces, mostly infantry and a single cavalry unit and pushes hard into the flank of the hoplites and phalanxes. Once after another they break and route as Chandragupta achieves both his momentum. However several stubborn phalanx hold out against all odds. Still they paid a heavy price, three of more phalanx and hoplite units have broken. With that the turn is over and so is the battle. Many light infantry broke after being urged onwards, by there impetuous commander.

Photo- final positions


Rout Points
Seleucids - 263
Mauryans - 54 - although easily another 30+ rout points fleeing and like unable to rally

Aftermath

Well I had a lot of fun, but really handled the Seleucids poorly. In hindsight, I should have worried less about being flanked and just pushed. Even when flanked the phalanxes can hold. Also some better tactical play on the flanks I think could have seen a better result. Using the light cavalry better would have helped for sure. I'll have to play it again face to face next time and really work it out.

I feel like the Seleucids are in a tough spot, those cataphracted elephants are a lot more powerful than normal elephants, being more immune to missile weapons makes them very strong. As soon as they engage they make short work out of cavalry, mind you all elephants do that, but the fact they can take a lot more punishment from missile fire and some of their Troop Qualities are high (some of them get 7), makes them very, very tough to take out.

The command system of mauryans proved to be a major boon. Being able to move so many units each turn meant you could exploit wholes in the line easily and if you were willing to take the cohesion hits, you could move units many times. Also the charisma abilities are very powerful(and being able to use it adjacent in certain circumstances is amazingly good).

Finally though the light infantry seem excellent. While not particularly powerful, their reasonably low rout level value and their ability to reaction fire and harass meant they could at least survive a little while against the phalanxes. Sure they stood little chance frontally, but given they could reaction fire with their missile weapons, deal a hit or two and then in combat do the same, it put the phalanxes on the verge of collapse at times. They also seemed useful against elephants. I'm not saying they are super, by any means, but they were much better than I thought they would be and pretty good at forcing your opponent to attack and holding up their units.

Conclusions

Other than realizing I need to play the Seleucids much better, I do think the scenario favours the Mauryans a bit. Having said that it just makes want to do better with the Seleucids. Over all the game was really fun and I'd definitely play Chandragupta some more. I think this is a very solid game from the series. I think I still like SPQR the best, but this runs a pretty close second. I'll be interested to see what it is like against another human, I think it will be more fun and my estimation may rise.

For those looking at this game, I'd say this, if you are new to the Great Battles of History take a look at Great Battles of Alexander first. This game borrows a lot from that and has less fiddly units in some of its scenarios (mainly no elephants except in a few scenarios). I think as far as solo games go this is one of the best and it plays well face to face too (well the system does). If your are somewhat familiar with GBoH, go ahead this is tons of fun.
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tiger tiger
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Good Report.

I don't have Chandra, but am a fan of the series. Aren't HI/PH attack superior to LI? Your praise of the LI surprises me a little. Also, how does Sybritius trump Chandragupta if Seleucus is the only 6 leader for the Greeks?

I actually played a playtest version of this scenario, not knowing much about Cat. Elephants. I played the Seleucids. The elephants swooped down and made a mess of my left flank. I concluded the Greek left flank needs to withdraw back towards the center as much as possible, and protect the center infantry as they advance to engage the LI. Easier said than done. Thanks for the AAR, nice read.
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Colin Hunter
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tiger,tiger wrote:
Good Report.

I don't have Chandra, but am a fan of the series. Aren't HI/PH attack superior to LI? Your praise of the LI surprises me a little.
Light infantry is trash, but the ability to reaction fire and fire in their turn is really useful, if you are clever you can deal several hits to phalanxes as they come in and then they will take another two hits often in hand to hand. This can be enough to bring them up to about 5 hits. At that stage they are in danger of breaking. Sure you need something to break them, but if you can flank them or bring in a better unit, it isn't too hard, but I like that the LI could basically hold off the PH and HO for quite a while. Of course frontally they never stand much of a chance, but given most of your units are worth half RPs, that is pretty good, considering how much a double unit is worth. LI can actually just overwhelm the phalanx eventually.
Quote:

Also, how does Sybritius trump Chandragupta if Seleucus is the only 6 leader for the Greeks?
Sounds like a mistake doesn't it I'm guessing I made a mistake in my notes and probably Chandragupta failed momentum and then Sybritius acted, thanks for pointed that out. I'll fix it. I stupidly made notes at the end of each turn instead of as it happened so...blush
Quote:

I actually played a playtest version of this scenario, not knowing much about Cat. Elephants. I played the Seleucids. The elephants swooped down and made a mess of my left flank. I concluded the Greek left flank needs to withdraw back towards the center as much as possible, and protect the center infantry as they advance to engage the LI. Easier said than done. Thanks for the AAR, nice read.
Yeah I think you are absolutely right, I was actually thinking about that last night. In fact I did withdraw them, but yeah I think going towards the middle is the way to go, hindsight eh?
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ibn_ul_khattab wrote:
LI can actually just overwhelm the phalanx eventually.


Only if the LI are two or three deep. But then the Phalanx has routed 20-30 Rout points worth to its own 12 or 14.

The Phalanxes should be able to rout the LI in 2 Orders phases. If they're TQ 5 they have a 40% chance of getting at minimum one hit during the Pre-shock TQ check, 30% if tq is 6. With Attack Superiority and a good column to roll on the Phanlanx has a decent chance of inflicting 6 hits on the 2 LI they are facing. The Li have one chance at missle fire for entry hex reaction. After combat they will be missle NO. It is important to recover the phanlanxes when you can, which you can often after the enemy routs. Routing units also often put hits on rear lines as they're usually unavoidable.
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Colin Hunter
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tiger,tiger wrote:
ibn_ul_khattab wrote:
LI can actually just overwhelm the phalanx eventually.


Only if the LI are two or three deep. But then the Phalanx has routed 20-30 Rout points worth to its own 12 or 14.

The Phalanxes should be able to rout the LI in 2 Orders phases. If they're TQ 5 they have a 40% chance of getting at minimum one hit during the Pre-shock TQ check, 30% if tq is 6. With Attack Superiority and a good column to roll on the Phanlanx has a decent chance of inflicting 6 hits on the 2 LI they are facing. The Li have one chance at missle fire for entry hex reaction. After combat they will be missle NO. It is important to recover the phanlanxes when you can, which you can often after the enemy routs. Routing units also often put hits on rear lines as they're usually unavoidable.
Yes you are only going to deal a few hits with missile combat and yes you could take hits coming in. In this scenario the phalanxes are TQ6 which is the same as at least some of the light infantry. What I've found is the light infantry can tire the phalanx out and while they will struggle to actually route the phalanx, putting the phalanx on 5 Cohesion hits (one less than routing) is pretty easy. I realize though that I make it sound like the light infantry frontally breaks the phalanx, it doesn't, but it hold it up significantly and tires it out, which allows pretty much anything to finish it off. Also the Mauryans effectively have more commanders and more opportunities to rally fleeing units and recover Cohesion. Also the plethora of missile weapons will generally put a halt to recovering the phalanx units easily, but of course if you can it is very powerful. Also if you are willing to commit your Overall commander (which I have to admit, I'm not convinced is always a good idea), you gain a significant charisma benefit. Also Hoplites are obviously worse than Phlanxes in this regard for a number of reasons.

The other thing to consider here is that a single TQ 6 phalanx is the equivalent of 4 TQ 6 light infantry (in terms of rout points). Secondly generally speaking the Phalanx is probably shorter in length because of this and will have to fight 3 on the ends of the line, not just two. I agree most light units (except when out number three to one) will only last two rounds (possibly three depending). However given you get 4 units for every phalanx and these units can actually be rallied and you have the command structure to give it a go, it is pretty decent I think. Yes in lines you will take an extra hit for fleeing units and this is a definite disadvantage, but if you last two rounds against a phalanx it will like be on 5 cohesion hits (1 for reaction fire, 2 for each round of combat). Also on Column 10 (which is what you are likely on, possibly 11 for numbers) if you roll a 0-3 (a 40% chance) you will only be dishing out 2 hits to each light infantry, not 3, which you really need to break them in two turns). To me the math is pretty simple, 1 hit say from reaction fire, plus two rounds of combat, equals 5 hits. At this stage the Phalanx is in serious trouble, let alone on the flanks where light infantry can probably get an extra man in. For hoplites this is even worse as they are 1 column down. I fully admit I didn't not explain this fully in my original post and I should have.

I suspect we are actually agreeing believe it or not. I don't mean to imply that LI is walking all over phalanxes, it isn't, but the fact that it can do much better than I thought it would (and my experience in the past has taught me), I found interesting. I also think that the fact that phalanxes can afford bad luck a lot less than light infantry units is a telling factor, phalanxes can't rally and while they can hold out almost indefinitely even from flank attack (as I found out) given enough good rolls, they also can simply break once they are on 5 Cohesion hits. Also remember the Phalanxes (except of course in a flank situation) are likely doing the attacking which makes routing a distinct possibility at that stage (since they add three) and a second line will likely be able to stop them recovering Cohesion.

edit: It seems unlikely they would route 20-30 points of Li, that would be (if taken at 30 rp) 10 LI 6TQ units each, that seems ridiculous, by anyones standards, even at 20 RP almost 7 LI of TQ6. Sure 3-4 maybe, but not 7-10. In fact it is the fact mauryan LI is worth half RPs that makes them good, otherwise they are a lot worse.
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Colin,

Have enjoyed the discussion.

I suspect we're mostly in agreement too. I'll concede that TQ 6 LI are much tougher than TQ 5, as I've played a few scenarios with them. They each are able to absorb a hit as well as being able to pass the Pre-shock Tq more often, and its not as bad when they do. Each increment in TQ makes for quite a large difference in any troop type.


I was not aware that in Chandra. the LI are halved for Rout point calculation. Either I've forgotten or it was not that way when I played the playtest version. I was assuming they counted fully, as in other games, and that the Phalanxes could rout 3-4 of them before routing themselves. The halving makes them much less lucrative for the Seleucids to go after, but given their other choices in this scenario I would guess they have little choice. Conceptually the halving would make them more like MI in other games(Alexander, SPQR) for the difference in Rout points given versus RP accumulated for yourself.

Playing with Phalanxes is often tricky, as often you have to be aggressive with them and yet still maintain a line to avoid exposing their flanks. If you play them passively the enemy can dink and dunk specific units to make holes in your line. On rare occasions, one thing I have done if the units are available is to have a few cavalry units behind the phalanx line to plug any holes formed by routed phalanxes. Sometimes you can do the same by leaving behind a couple of phalaxes at intervals, while the front units close the holes as they advance. Making a second reserve "line". Though you really need a spare leader if the first leader is giving orders through line commands. Most of the time this isn't practical.

Using certain game tactics can also help, using a 2nd or 3rd Momentum phase to recover instead of attacking, or to "dress a line" if some units have advanced after combat while others still have a unit to finish off. Having single hex units protect the ends is a must as well.

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Stephen R. Welch
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Colin -- very nice AAR! Thanks so much for posting it ... makes me want to break out Gandhara again for another round of solitaire!

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Robert Bracey
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ibn_ul_khattab wrote:

This battle that takes place on the banks of the Indus near Gandhara was historically a tactical draw, although Seleucus was forced out of the Indus valley...


Nice report. Though readers unfamiliar with the period should be warned there is no evidence any battle ever took place. This, like most of the material in this expansion is more an Indian themed 300 than a historical scenario.
 
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