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1960: The Making of the President» Forums » Sessions

Subject: Nixon's Back! rss

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Joshua Gardner
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"The only one who's changed is me. I've become more bitter and, let's face it, crazy over the years. And when I'm swept into office, I'll sell our children's organs to zoos for meat, and I'll go into people's houses at night and wreck up the place!"

It's the first time playing for both of us, I am filling the role of Nixon, which is awesome. I love playing the stereotypical role of the "crazed conservative", ala Stephen Colbert. Much more fun than playing a wussy, America-hating "wussy liberal" (see what I did there!).

A lucky draw allows Nixon to gather momentum in the West. Their initial support means they will be the last to die in the impending robot apocalypse. Kennedy begins gaining support in the Northeast, spending a great deal of time campaigning in New York and Pennsylvania, gathering enough support to carry both states. Nixon bides his time, he'll bring those liberal elitists to his side soon enough...

Turn two rolls around, Kennedy moves his campaign South. Nixon immediately kills whatever momentum Kennedy has gained through some well-timed events, and follows up with killing his campaigning potential with a -2 CP card. Regardless, Kennedy spreads the wealth and hobnobs to the best of his ability with the Southern folk, gaining support in Texas, Florida, Georgia, and Tennessee. Nixon's campaign moves to the Midwest and begins to lock down Ohio, Illinois, and Michigan, and begins bombarding television stations all along the East coast.

Turn three is when both candidates realize they should really take a stand on the issues. It seems to be the best way for each campaign to gain momentum, and we get these cool endorsement things that supposedly play some role in the end. Despite the print media's deeply ingrained liberalism and hatred for Nixon, they know what's best for the country, and papers in the Midwest and West endorse his candidacy, while sources of Liberal propaganda in the East and South of COURSE side with Kennedy.



Turn four is when things get a little interesting. Kennedy, not wanting to lose the liberal Northeast, moves there and begins campaigning in the more snobby states. Nixon doesn't need them, and before Kennedy has time to buy ad space, takes away the Spend-o-crat's lead in New York and Pennsylvania.

In turn five Nixon moves South while Kennedy rebuilds in the Northeast. Nixon, whom the people KNOW would be the best candidate militarily, plays a few events to take advantage of this predisposition and kills Kennedy's support in the South.

At this point, the debates begin. A quick rereading of the rules, and Kennedy calls foul. Apparently, Nixon forgot to mention that the party symbol on the bottom of the cards indicates which side it plays to. Nixon concedes, and wouldn't you know it, loses each issue in the debate (stupid liberal media and their biased debate structure).

"That's it! You're all going to jail, and don't expect me to grant a pardon like that sissy, Ford."

Coming off the debates, both campaigns agree they want to be SURE how the campaign strategy affects Election Day. A wayward consultant walks by the map, and says to both campaigns "I'm surprised you guys aren't fighting over the issue track much... you know the game is won by endorsements, right?" Both campaigns give this man a puzzled look. "You see, if you have an endorsement in the East, you only need to get rid of all of your opponent's cubes, and not build up any of your own." So the New York Times IS good for something other than toilet paper! Kennedy and Nixon look at each other, and begin a frantic chase to kill the other's cubes in endorsed regions. Kennedy focuses and killing Nixon's support in the South and East, but is having trouble swaying large states like New York and New Jersey. Nixon kills any remaining support Kennedy had in the Midwest, and starts carrying Ohio (you see, Nixon can see into the future, and knows, "as goes Ohio, so goes the Nation"). Unfortunately, Kennedy plays an event card that gives him five support checks in Illinois on Election Day. Nixon gives up on the Prairie State, they will be the first forcible annexation under his new reign.

Election Day rolls around. Kennedy, playing one too many 4cp cards, takes a peek at the bag to see a sea of red. His hopes dwindle for an Election Day surge. Nixon sees control swing in Texas, West Virginia, and Michigan, with all red support checks in each.

The campaigns pull the final tally. Kennedy grabs Texas, Illinois, and California. Nixon grabs New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Michigan. The rest of the states are grabbed by their respective victor, and the totals are added up.

Nixon 280
Kennedy 257

Nixon's back baby! Here comes the Robot Apocalypse! Hurray for the forced Annexation of Texas!



EDIT: Fixed for spelling errors, clarity.
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Jason Lott
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Great session report! I liked the reporting aspect.

But it sounds like you both learned a lot about the rules as you went along. Do you think you'd have played things differently if you understood it all clearly from the beginning?
 
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Joshua Gardner
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Well, we were only focused on the issue symbol on the cards when selecting for the campaign strategy deck in the debates. Obviously, if you need to think about the party affiliation, you're selecting one card in your initial hand that MUST go to campaign strategy, and which FIVE you're going to play in the turn. So the debates were not only hosed, but you end up playing cards a little too "care-free" in those first five turns.

Second, we didn't focus on the issue track that much, neglecting the power of momentum and endorsements. Since we weren't playing that area much, issues were never really shifted much by the person with media control. During the game, we were curious about the importance of that mechanic. I see it much more now in retrospect.

Overall, it was a fun experience, but we both wanted to play again immediately after to give it another go now that we understood the strategy (unfortunately, I only had an hour more to play). Just too much focus on the back and forth of campaigning.
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Dennis Leung
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Thanks for the session report (can Futurama do no wrong?). My girlfriend and I just got this in a trade and are going to try and get it out sometime soon, and this report is a nice overview. Even after reading the rules several times, I still keep forgetting what endorsements are good for. Thanks for the reminder!
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John Rogers
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Excellent session report! Very funny with wonderful quotes and a fantastic final picutre.

I just re-watched A Head In The Polls last night, one of my favorite episodes.

May I add;

"Morbo will now introduce tonight's candidates... PUNY HUMAN NUMBER ONE, PUNY HUMAN NUMBER TWO, and Morbo's good friend, Richard Nixon."



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