Recommend
4 
 Thumb up
 Hide
15 Posts

Ticket to Ride» Forums » Rules

Subject: How do you determine the Longest Route? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Steven
United States
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I just tried TTR two-player for the first time last night. We had a dispute about how the longest route was calculated. My significant other had a snaky, continuous chain from the west to the east coast. By contrast, I had a hub-and-spoke network where I had a bunch of different branches emerging from the midwest -- Kansas City, I think. She argued that "longest route" meant the longest route between any two cities that you've connected. I argued that "longest route" meant the total number of train cars in your largest network. Which is correct?

(Incidentally, the argument was resolved when she realized that she was beating me by 40 points anyway!)
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
MTip Phaovibul
United States
Mosier
Oregon
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
I would said that your wife is correct.
15 
 Thumb up
0.01
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jason Miller
Canada
Medicine Hat
Alberta
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
celiborn wrote:
I just tried TTR two-player for the first time last night. We had a dispute about how the longest route was calculated. My significant other had a snaky, continuous chain from the west to the east coast. By contrast, I had a hub-and-spoke network where I had a bunch of different branches emerging from the midwest -- Kansas City, I think. She argued that "longest route" meant the longest route between any two cities that you've connected. I argued that "longest route" meant the total number of train cars in your largest network. Which is correct?

(Incidentally, the argument was resolved when she realized that she was beating me by 40 points anyway!)


Scratch my first comment, she's right, I misunderstood the scenarios.
2 
 Thumb up
0.04
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dennis Leung
United States
Half Moon Bay
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I think that the longest route bonus is for the longest linear path of your trains. This prioritizes the long, snaky paths more than the hub and spoke paths, since generally it will be easier to hit all of your tickets by branching out.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael Randolph
United States
Strawberry Plains
Tennessee
flag msg tools
mbmb
The longest route can only utilize a section of track once, but it can loop back on a city more than once. Bridging spokes can make for a redundant piece of track but it help win the longest route.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
♪ Isaäc Bickërstaff ♫
United States
Greer
South Carolina
flag msg tools
designer
Entropy Seminar:
badge
The results of a five yeer studee ntu the sekund lw uf thurmodynamiks aand itz inevibl fxt hon shewb rt nslpn raq liot.
Avatar
mb
From the rules (emphasis mine):

Quote:
The player who has the Longest Continuous Path of routes receives this special bonus card and adds 10 points to his score. In the case of a tie for the longest path, all tied players score the 10 points bonus.

So, you were right, but she would have had the bonus anyway, based on your description.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
JOHN TODD JENSEN
United States
CLYMAN
WI
flag msg tools
Ask me about it!
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Most people I've played with determine Longest Route in the same way that Longest Road is determined in Settlers of Catan; that is, the most trains between two points in your network, branches excluded. This is probably why the rules are vague on this subject. So, if you've played all 45 of your trains on the board, and your tree has no branches, your longest continuous path is 45. If you have only one spur and it is length 2, then your longest continuous path is 43. Und so weiter, . . .
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Carl Brousseau
United States
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
mbmbmb
jtj608 wrote:
Most people I've played with determine Longest Route in the same way that Longest Road is determined in Settlers of Catan; that is, the most trains between two points in your network, branches excluded. This is probably why the rules are vague on this subject.


It's also the way it's calculated in the online game at www.daysofwonder.com.

If the point had been to compensate a "hub and spoke" type of network by rewarding the player who laid the most trains, the bonus would simply have gone to the player who triggers the last turn. (Most players almost never have two disconnected networks in play)
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Steven
United States
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks everyone! Once again, BGGers come to the rescue.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kenny VenOsdel
United States
Saint Paul
Minnesota
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Verkisto wrote:
From the rules (emphasis mine):

Quote:
The player who has the Longest Continuous Path of routes receives this special bonus card and adds 10 points to his score. In the case of a tie for the longest path, all tied players score the 10 points bonus.

So, you were right, but she would have had the bonus anyway, based on your description.


No he wasn't right. A hub and spoke is not a continuous path. When you get to the end of a spoke it ends. No more path. The end. :) ;)
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Edward Kleiner
United States
New York
flag msg tools
At the end of the game when one player is down to three cars or less the ways to determine the longest route is look at all the cars placed and if its one or more destinations then you are assumed sure he or she gets the 10 bonus points however if they look alike one time I just manually counted the cars he or she had if they were connected the same.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Derek Jones
United States
Bend
Oregon
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Why would you never actually manually count the cars? It's ten seconds of counting.

To the OP, it might be more clear to your players to refer to it not as "Longest Route" but Longest Continuous Path, as the rules do. Just imagine your trains as a piece of yarn, and pulling it from the extreme ends to a straightened line. Little pieces that are tied to that piece of yarn don't affect its length.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Halden
Canada
Ottawa
Ontario
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I knew I could find the answer here! This debate just came up during our game of TTR and this settled it. Thanks
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Natural born viking
Sweden
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks from me as well. The rule is easier to apply with the above clarifications.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Craig Duncan
United States
Ithaca
New York
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I second all the thanks to the OP and others for settling this.

djnafai wrote:
Why would you never actually manually count the cars? It's ten seconds of counting.

To the OP, it might be more clear to your players to refer to it not as "Longest Route" but Longest Continuous Path, as the rules do. Just imagine your trains as a piece of yarn, and pulling it from the extreme ends to a straightened line. Little pieces that are tied to that piece of yarn don't affect its length.



I like this analogy.

Here's another way to explain the idea (a way that I at least find intuitive).

Your longest route = the farthest you could travel in any of your networks without traveling on any track twice, i.e. without "double dipping" on any of your rail segments.

(That eliminates the hub and spoke alternative, since once you got to the end of a spoke you'd have to double back on yourself to return to the hub.)
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.