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Subject: Advice on how to BBQ rotisserie a prime rib rss

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Mr. Mike
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Langley
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I have been doing a lot of BBQ'ing recently but haven't used my rotisserie yet. Saturday I have a bunch of friends coming over for a BBQ and I want to do a Prime Rib.

Any advice? What Temperature do you use?
How Long?
What Seasoning?

thanks.

it is a 8 lb roast
 
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AMERIGAMER!
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Connecticut
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You set it, and forget it!

(Act now and get a bagel cutter)
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John Burt
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Saskatoon
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What do you like for seasonings? I am a spice guy so I tend to make my food a little hot. I finish with BBQ sauce.

I like to marinade first (currently I have a pork loin I used a cajun rub on in my fridge) then cook it over indirect heat for about 15 minutes/lb (beef) or until the internal temp reaches about 125 F. Remove it from the grill, cover it in foil and let it sit about 15-20 minutes to finish.

I swear by this book by Tarantino (Jim) and use many of the rubs and marinades from there.
 
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Tom Hancock
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Charleston
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Barbeque sauce on a prime rib? That must be a regional difference of some sort. No one in my area of the USA puts sauce (other than aus jus) on prime rib.

I would cut slits in the meat, shove whole peeled garlic cloves in, then rub it down with fresh rosemary, onion powder, garlic powder, paprika, salt and pepper. Smoking it with some wet wood chips in a foil packet in the grill is great too.

I also wouldn't follow minutes per pound directions- get a thermometer and cook it to an internal temperature you are comfortable with. Nothing worse than an overcooked piece of beef.
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Sear it on all sides on the stovetop. Then, cook it at the lowest temperature possible. Season it with good old salt and pepper before hand.

I do mine in a 250 (F) oven for about an hour and a half, but you should get an internal probe thermometer and set it for the temperature you want.

Don't put barbeque or ketchup on it. Please. That's a pricey cut of meat there.
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Mr. Mike
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Langley
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we like a bit of the hot and spicy,
i was thinking of cutting the garlic into the roast since we all love garlic.
I was also going to do a rub, but wasnt' sure on the seasoning, Tom your rub looks good,

as for temperature, what would the inside temperature of a medium rare roast be?
 
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Hopefully becoming a restaurant owner soon! Peter Melanson
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zorazen wrote:

Don't put barbeque or ketchup on it. Please. That's a pricey cut of meat there.


If he does, I will personally hunt him down and stab him with the BBQ fork.

To quote a bbq site I use:

Quote:
To satisfy government home economists, the Beef Council says rare beef means an internal temperature of 140 degrees F. Well, that is ok if you like well-done and dry meat. If you like moist, rosy meat (like I do), rare begins at 120 degrees F. and starts to become medium rare at 125 to 130 degrees F. To cook your meat properly, you must purchase and use a good instant-read digital meat thermometer.
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Neon Joe, Werewolf He-yump
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zorazen wrote:
Don't put barbeque or ketchup on it. Please. That's a pricey cut of meat there.


Blasphemy! surprise Everything's better with barbecue sauce!

I'll agree that putting ketchup on it would be criminal

(edit: I mean, obviously you wouldn't smother such a thing, but I can't see a light glazing of the sauce doing any meat wrong. Then again, I am a bit loopy for BBQ sauce )
 
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John Burt
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hancock.tom wrote:
Barbeque sauce on a prime rib? That must be a regional difference of some sort. No one in my area of the USA puts sauce (other than aus jus) on prime rib.



You are right, I had a temporary brain fart.
 
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J
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I think 135 degrees is good for medium-rare.

DO NOT put sauce on it.

DO NOT cut it in advance to stuff it with things unless you want the moisture to run out.

Searing does nothing to "seal in the juices." It's a myth.

Those are the facts, folks. Don’t shoot the messenger!
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Doug Iverson
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Low (temp) and slow is the way to go for prime rib.
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Searing does not seal in juices, that is absolutely true. Yet, it does make for good flavor and crust on the outside. That is also true.
 
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