David C
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So, I'm a 'big' with Big Brothers Big Sisters. My 'little' is really into mythology and story. He's a very smart 9-year-old.

The first outing, was playing heroscape. Not bad, but he had all the toys, but had never actually played the games before. I looked-up boardgameswithscott, and tom vasel's heroscape thoughts, and it all made sense. So we played a very basic game of heroscape.

Things worked pretty well. You can't be really strict or into playing by the rules too hardcore with a kid who is excited about playing with heroquest.

So we setup for our second game, and eventually the rules devolve into more of 'guidelines' and sound effects. Which is cool, but, my right brain was actually starting to hurt from making up a good story to go along with the 'fight' that could keep-up with him. My imagination ain't what it used to be.

.... then the other night at game night. I got introduced to Arkham Horror. Now I know what you're thinking: BAD IDEA. I'm with you, sort of. If you strip-down the rules some, I've got a game system that works the story for me, no fighting with a DM (every D&D session I've ever been in with anyone devolves into a "What would a griffin do?"). I haven't given this a shot, but I'm curious if there's something better than AH with some of the tedium washed-out. Runescape takes forever---so I'm told for just two of us. Pandemic and Space Alert seem good, but miss the theme and the rules are semi-important to follow. Dungeon Twister is adversarial. The last is Talisman, but looks incredibly boring, although probably great for our loose "stick to the rules" style.

Any suggestions for a cooperative fantasy-themed game?
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Jon M
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Shadows over Camelot would be one to look at.

You can fix the traitor deck so the young 'un is not the traitor (very easy to do with a bit of slight of hand when setting up).

The rules are very simple - one bad thing then one good thing. The bad is lose a life, place a catapult or draw a black card.

The good is play a special card, play a card to a quest, move locations, battle catapults (when at Camelot), regain a life by discarding cards or draw more cards (again only if at Camelot).

Most of the quests are self explanatory.

The fun part for him will be trying to actually beat the game engine and also trying to discover who is the traitor.
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Brian Forsythe
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I've been in a similar situation with my kids and went round and round looking at what was available. If you're considering Talisman, I'd suggest Prophecy (the game I decided on) instead -- a similar game that many see as an improvement. Its rules are pretty basic/straightforward and you shouldn't have much problem coming up with a storyline. Out of the box, it's not cooperative, but there are cooperative variants in its forums that I've been planning to try. They seem pretty do-able, especially if you're playing fast-and-loose with the details. That said, it can be a pretty long game, though playing cooperatively should shorten it. There are also some variants suggesting some starting equipment/abilities to shorten the game. If your prime interest is crafting a story and shared experience rather than being challenged by trying to defeat the game, you could equip characters with even more equipment and skills than the variants suggest, shortening it further. Definitely an option.
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David C
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I like the prophecy suggestion, and I really hadn't heard/known about it until it was recommended. MUCH thanks.

1.) I like that it's not PG-13. I think he's able to deal with the fantasy horror aspect of arkham, but...if I don't have to, I won't. Besides, it's not his theme of choice anyway.

2.) The map actually looks semi exciting as opposed to talisman. (realize that this is MY problem, and not his. Yes, I am that shallow, and we pair-up nicely.)

3.) The combat is simplistic.

4.) Seems INCREDIBLY adaptable to coop play, which wouldn't have shown-up in the geek search.
 
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Rick Carnagey
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For a kid that age, Lord Of The Rings might be about right. I know alot of people on BGG aren't that fond of it, but kids seem to like it alot.

Every time I meet someone who does gaming with kids/youth they recommend it to me. I finally bought it, and have only had a chance to play it once with one kid, but she seemed to really like it.

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David C
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netizen wrote:

For a kid that age, Lord Of The Rings might be about right. I know alot of people on BGG aren't that fond of it, but kids seem to like it alot.

Every time I meet someone who does gaming with kids/youth they recommend it to me. I finally bought it, and have only had a chance to play it once with one kid, but she seemed to really like it.



The big question mark on LOTR is that it's a kinizia game, and kinizia games aren't about the narrative in the least. The kid likes a good story, and knows I'll let him reroll until success happens (pretty common 9-year-old behavior in my travels. It's ok, they return the favor when they're 13-14).

Just an update to this thread: Lord of the rings, Heroscape, Prophecy, Hero: The Infernal Forge, all have very, very good videos on them. The prophecy episode is a boardgameswithscott, and it goes into small depth on runebound.

Tales of Arabian Nights looks good, but... that's another day in the far,far future.
 
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David C
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Kind of a side note, I started to put together Dungeon Plungin'. This, specifically, isn't going to work. Throwing a book full of stats and look-up tables (which is what it seems like) isn't awesome to a guy learning about his first magic missile...so-to-speak.

It's funny, because there's all these things that everyone who plays these games just knows... and you forget that they don't "just know" everything that you do.
 
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Castle Panic. Plays in less than an hour. Simple rules. All the other suggestions take 2-4 hours, at least.

Taliman is craploads of fun for a young kid. I think it's best around preteen age. I'm not sure if it's your taste, though.

Too bad he's not old enough to sit down and read cards. Jambo's a nicely adversarial game that future CCG players should be able to grasp.

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Matt Kruczek
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For loose mechanisms that you can build a story around, and you're not that fussed about sticking to the rules, you might try to get a hold of The Sorcerer's Cave, or (dare I say it) Munchkin.
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David C
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He actually suggested Munchkin.

He can read cards, it's just, I feel like a horrible rule lawyer when I have to point out, "oh, your character has 'dodge -2' ... so your roll is really hard. Oh, you didn't read the 30 page manual? Well. I did."

Which is nice when it's on the cards in full descriptiveness, like, say when you flip a card over and an event happens...

A Touch of Evil: The Supernatural Game plays in an hour or so...
 
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Matt Kruczek
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Munchkin is probably the least rules-lawyery game out there. There's actually a line in there that says "In the event of a rules conflict, the owner of the game decides". Also all of the multipliers are on the cards, so he'll have everything in front of him.

What I didn't take in account originally was that you wanted a co-op game, whereas Munchkin focuses on the backstabbing. However with a spot of tweaking I can imagine it being quite a good little co-op. (Instead of the game ending when one player reaches level 10, it ends when ALL players do).
 
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