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http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/32273314/ns/business-us_business...

"Post officials sent a list of nearly 700 potential closing candidates to the independent Postal Regulatory Commission for review."

"No changes are expected before the end of the current fiscal year on Sept. 30. There are 32,741 post offices."

"In addition, Postmaster General John Potter has asked Congress for permission to reduce mail deliveries from six days a week to five."

The list of candiates for closure should be available at

http://www.prc.gov/

but I think they are overloaded as I write after appearing on the nightly news programs...
 
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I was just having a conversation about this with the lady at my local Post Office. She was telling me how she believed the USPS to be in big trouble. Looks like e-mail is the culprit, along with all the content on the interwebs. Video killed the radio star once again.
 
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Emily H.
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Thanks for posting this.
 
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Travis Easton
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I think the recession is the biggest culprit. First-class mail wasn't really the big ticket item; bulk mailings are way down. A lot of heavy volume mailers were banks, credit card companies, auto companies, and housing/mortgage.

2005-2007 had the most mail volume ever for the USPS, so I just can't see that email is the real culprit.

Also. most of the POs being targeted for closure are ones in large cities where there's an office like every 2 or 3 blocks.

FWIW, I don't see the PO getting rid of Saturday delivery either. But that's just me, a simple letter carrier.
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Jason W
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Besides that they spent millions on ads saying they deliver on saturday and don't charge for it. Of course if they do not cancel sat. then what day of the week do they cancel?
 
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Diane Close
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The list is also located here too.
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blaze1599 wrote:
Besides that they spent millions on ads saying they deliver on saturday and don't charge for it. Of course if they do not cancel sat. then what day of the week do they cancel?


Tuesday has frequently been mentioned as the day to be canceled, due to its low volume.
 
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Travis Easton
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I can't see how you can close a normal business day of the week. It's just not gonna happen.

Plus if you get rid of Saturday, Tuesday will no longer have low volume, as a fair amount of Monday's bulk mail would get pushed to Tuesday.

It's Saturday or nothin', and that's still not likely.

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I hope they close the one close to me. It's ran by two long overdue retirees that work at the speed of cold sap, half of which is always on some kind of break. Subsequently there is always a line out to the street. Proof that the unions are killing the economy. If they ran the postal service like their livelihood depended on it, they might have succeeded better.
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My 2 closest post offices are on the list. One is a 5 minute walk from my house. I've loved having it so close, since I do a lot of book swapping.
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pdclose wrote:
The list is also located here too.

Thanks, and even today it appears the official site (www.prc.gov) is still being overwhelmed. Also found another site that looks like they were able to download the official PDF and share their copy:

http://goinglikesixty.com/images/usps_closures.pdf

and the following site has it in plain regular text (not in a pdf)

http://www.newsnidea.com/9106/list-of-post-office-closings-p...

Looks like no New Hampshire locations, several in the Boston area though at colleges and the airport.
 
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Richard Maurer
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Mutombo wrote:
I think the recession is the biggest culprit. First-class mail wasn't really the big ticket item; bulk mailings are way down. A lot of heavy volume mailers were banks, credit card companies, auto companies, and housing/mortgage.

2005-2007 had the most mail volume ever for the USPS, so I just can't see that email is the real culprit.

Also. most of the POs being targeted for closure are ones in large cities where there's an office like every 2 or 3 blocks.

FWIW, I don't see the PO getting rid of Saturday delivery either. But that's just me, a simple letter carrier.


Agreed, most of the USPS's revenues come from postage of advertising which have been slashed across the board by companies. Plus, the fact that the USPS is unionized which means they getting slammed with providing healthcare and pensions for retired and soon to be retired workers. The good old days are coming to an end with a vengeance.
 
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WhiteKong wrote:
MWChapel wrote:
Proof that the unions are killing the economy.


It's not "proof" that unions are killing anything. Go spend a day in an underground coal mine, talk to the workers, then tell them to their faces that unions are killing our economy.

If corporations weren't taking an ever-increasing slice of the profits for themselves at the expense of the worker, then unions wouldn't even be necessary. Treat people with respect and dignity and give them a living wage, and they'll never unionize.

The post office has a union because they can't count on congress not to cut their pay below a living wage. If you don't believe congress would do it, then check out how much an Army Private First Class makes in a year - the army is non-union.

Now, the post office does need to close some branches, but it has nothing to do with unions. The branches need to close because mail has become nearly useless these days. More than 80% of all the mail is unsolicited junk mail. And the post office can't make money from junk mail because congress made deals with junk-mail distributors to send out catalogs for the same price as a postcard, subsidized by all of us.

It wasn't the union that decided to give junk-mailers a sweetheart deal. It wasn't the union that invented e-mail. It wasn't the union that invented electronic banking. THESE are the reasons that the post office is in trouble.

Just because your particular post office is slow doesn't necessarily mean that every post office is slow, and most certainly doesn't mean that unions are bad. You know who's slow? The McDonald's near my house is slower than hell, and it doesn't have anything to do with unions - it's because they don't pay a living wage, so they wind up with the most unmotivated workforce that the federal minimum can buy. So, they don't get very much business, making service even slower, and forcing them to let go of a portion of the pitiful workforce they have, which makes service worse, which costs more jobs, etc. I suppose using your logic, THAT'S proof that a lack of unions is ruining the economy.


Ditto, once Obama gets a government health care option, don't be surprised if you see every company in America dropping their health care coverage for their workers because it is just too "expensive" to compete with the government.
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I think some folks are a bit off topic and sorry for not being clear in the base post... I posted this in the "Trading" forum because it has the possibility of affecting those of us who trade and sometimes use USPS to ship.
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Justin Hoffman
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Ricomaurer wrote:
Agreed, most of the USPS's revenues come from postage of advertising which have been slashed across the board by companies. Plus, the fact that the USPS is unionized which means they getting slammed with providing healthcare and pensions for retired and soon to be retired workers. The good old days are coming to an end with a vengeance.


While the USPS is a somewhat unique animal in the pantheon of US federal organizations, unions have less to do with government costs than you seem to believe. As was pointed out earlier, the very non-union military, as well as civilian DoD employees, also have *massive* subsidized healthcare costs for their retirees. Until recently, a good many (I can't say "all" for sure) of the various U.S. federal benefits packages were classic pension packages regardless of whether the employees were unionized. The US federal government pays enormous sums to their retirees from all walks of government life. (My favorite is when agencies simply hire back retirees as a sort of "federal consultant" [civil service, not private sector positions] at 2x their last salary to perform their previous duties instead of promoting or training from within.)

And, here are a few fun facts that don't seem to make it to talk radio....did you know that, at least as late as 2003, sleep apnea was considered a disability by the U.S. Air Force (though I only knew USAF officers who would acknowledge they're pulling this benefit, I suspect it's standard across the branches)? I have worked directly with at least 6 retired (Lt. or full) Colonels pulling either 30% or 40% disability because they managed to get a USAF doc to diagnose their sleep apnea before they took off the Blue Suit and hit the private sector. This means they get disability payments...on top of their pensions...and, of course, their 6-figure post-service private-sector salaries...for life. For comparison, I believe losing an arm is also considered a 40% disability [I know there are ongoing fights over the disability percentages, so a current service member will have to confirm what the numbers are these days].

As for the original topic, Tuesday may have low volume, but if they close on a business day, I suspect FedEx and UPS stock prices will start to climb because business (at least the large ones) will shift away from the USPS even more aggressively--the discount my company gets from FedEx for 2- and 3-day guaranteed service already rivals USPS Priority for non-flat-rate items.

Based on my wife's mail, though, I would have thought Victoria's Secret was single-handedly subsidizing USPS service. We're averaging 4 catalogs a week from those folks...shake





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Roy Stephens
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WhiteKong wrote:
Long post... edited for space considerations


So how long have you been with your union?
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John Culp
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WhiteKong wrote:
MWChapel wrote:
Proof that the unions are killing the economy.


It's not "proof" that unions are killing anything. Go spend a day in an underground coal mine, talk to the workers, then tell them to their faces that unions are killing our economy.


ugh...go to 10 different coal mines. and you will get 10 different answers about unions. I am glad I work for a non-union company. i've worked for union coal mines, and frankly...the unions do very little good for the worker.
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james napoli
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interesting stuff, for me, i've always had a pleasant experience at my local usps offices, they typically help me with the best shipping methods and are friendly.

the other funny bit, is that for me personally i use the usps a ton more now that i ever have in my life and receive a ton more packages than i ever have.
i assume that business/personal letters are way down and that junk mail is also down, but i would have thought that online stores/ebay/mathTrades would have made up for it... oh well.
-

j
 
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Using my local USPS office has almost always been a good experience, the people are courteous and helpful. Obviously sometimes it gets busy (tax time, Christmas) but they seem to manage it as well as they can.
USPS is fine for shipping things less than a pound or so, and I do still mail some bills, and as much as I like the internet, I still love print magazines. Even shipping things up to a couple pounds is economically feasible and well-priced.

I have heard that the bulk mail - catalogs, applications, etc - is what really keeps the USPS going, and with the internet, those things are endangered as well (although I always enjoy the TRSI catalog.)

Without getting too off-topic, I do think that unionizing can run the risk of lowering some motivation for working hard/efficiently from an employee, and that can be bad for the service provided, and for the company as a whole.
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I looked at the proposed closure list, to see which locations in the L.A. area will be affected.

It saddens me that 4 of the 5 suggested closures all lie within a 4 square mile area, comprising of one of the most impoverished areas in the county. Great way to further disenfranchise those who can afford things the least.
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Richard Maurer
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dogmatix wrote:

And, here are a few fun facts that don't seem to make it to talk radio....did you know that, at least as late as 2003, sleep apnea was considered a disability by the U.S. Air Force (though I only knew USAF officers who would acknowledge they're pulling this benefit, I suspect it's standard across the branches)? I have worked directly with at least 6 retired (Lt. or full) Colonels pulling either 30% or 40% disability because they managed to get a USAF doc to diagnose their sleep apnea before they took off the Blue Suit and hit the private sector. This means they get disability payments...on top of their pensions...and, of course, their 6-figure post-service private-sector salaries...for life. For comparison, I believe losing an arm is also considered a 40% disability [I know there are ongoing fights over the disability percentages, so a current service member will have to confirm what the numbers are these days].


I knew that I should have enlisted in the air force when I got out of high school. Stupid me trying to make an honest living.
 
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