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Subject: Sin bins rss

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Ben Vincent
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This is disturbing:

Quote:
THOUSANDS of the worst families in England are to be put in "sin bins" in a bid to change their bad behaviour, Ed Balls announced yesterday.


The Children’s Secretary set out £400million plans to put 20,000 problem families under 24-hour CCTV super-vision in their own homes.

They will be monitored to ensure that children attend school, go to bed on time and eat proper meals.

Private security guards will also be sent round to carry out home checks, while parents will be given help to combat drug and alcohol addiction.


Though perhaps not quite as much as this:

Quote:
But Shadow Home Secretary Chris Grayling said: “This is all much too little, much too late.


Comments on Slashdot equate the Express to the National Enquirer - I'll take their word for it - though the Daily Telegraph has a very similar story (no mention of cameras).
 
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David desJardins
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SabreRedleg wrote:


What is disturbing? That there are so many dysfunctional parents? Or the measures proposed to deal with them? Or both?

It is interesting, and a little bit perplexing to me, that Britain in particular has such a problem with what they call "antisocial behavior", compared to other developed nations. Why is that?
 
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T. Nomad
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DaviddesJ wrote:
SabreRedleg wrote:


What is disturbing? That there are so many dysfunctional parents? Or the measures proposed to deal with them? Or both?

It is interesting, and a little bit perplexing to me, that Britain in particular has such a problem with what they call "antisocial behavior", compared to other developed nations. Why is that?

Because they draw the line much more clearly than other nations.
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David desJardins
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tommynomad wrote:
Because they draw the line much more dlearly than other nations.


Do you think so? It's not so clear to me. These seem like families where the children might already have been removed from the homes and be in foster care in other countries.
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If Actions Speak Louder Than Words, Then Actions x2 Speak Louder Than Actions
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This measure probably costs less than long term incarceration and all the costs that lead up to it... all footed by John Q.
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How tall is justice?
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Who IS this masked man? And WHY has he never been photographed together with 6 year old millionaire playboy Calvin?
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joebelanger wrote:
This measure probably costs less than long term incarceration and all the costs that lead up to it... all footed by John Q.

If the government were really thinking, they could have pitched this to a network as a reality show and saved John Q a lot more money.
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Cal Macewan
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The Telegraph and Express reporting rather sensationalises the issue, but there is a core of truth to the reporting.

It's targetted at what might be called problem families - the 'Shameless' mentioned in the Telegraph article is a reference to a black comedy drama about such a family. Typically these will be families living in council housing (social housing) on a large estate, who will as a whole be involved in a wide range of anti-social behaviour and criminality. These kind of families usually have a disproportionate impact on the rest of the community, and ruin the lives of the poor sods who have to live anywhere near them. However it's not just others who are affected by their behaviour - there's a good chance that children in these families will be 'at risk', alchol and drug misuse will be likely, and domestic violence common.


Whats not clear from the article is that the schemes under discussion (Family Intervention Projects) come in different levels of intrusion (the ones in the article are the rarest and most extreme), and they can't be forced on the families concerned and are very much a last resort. The fact that it is a last resort does mean there can be a degree of coercion though - these projects will kick in where the other alternatives would be things like eviction requiring the break up of the family, children taken into care for their protection and well being etc. The family will enter into a voluntary contract with the authorities regarding their behaviour and the support they will receive to modify it.

These measures are intended to help everyone, both the families concerned and the community at large. Is this disturbing?

You can read the gist of it all here:

http://www.respect.gov.uk/members/article.aspx?id=8678
 
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