Confusion Under Fire
United Kingdom
Warrington
Cheshire
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Every now and again someone wants to get into wargaming and they seek advice from the BGGers who frequent the wargaming forum. They then receive numerous games that will be ideal for their situation, but to a newbie this can be overwhelming. I think we wargamers often do not realise how daunting such a list can seem and the newbie may be put off at the first hurdle. In fact if the newbie plays an unsuitable game they may well be put off before realising how fun wargaming really is. What we, as wargamers do not even think about, may seem like Latin to a non wargamer.

My intention in this thread is to try to help someone who wants to enter the wargame world to understand some of the mechanics, ideas and terminology used. This may help the new player be better equipped to narrow down a choice of first wargame to play. Many people will offer good honest advice but it is you, the newbie who has to decide in the end. The first section will deal with what your tastes are, this will help you to decide what sort of wargame you may prefer.

If you are a newbie reading this then you may of had your interest piqued in wargaming by seeing a game being played in a club, you may have an interest in history or maybe you remember playing Risk as a kid and would like to recreate some of those halcyon days. Of course there are other reasons too and the reason you want to play wargames may be a factor in which wargame you decide to choose.

Wargames can be set in many different periods and even into the future. They can cover land, sea and air battles and some wargames have a fantasy or sci fi theme. It would be advisable to choose a period that you have an interest in as this will help you to understand the terminology and tactics. Wargame designers often try to make you use the tactics that were used in the day.

The level the action is set in, is an important factor for some wargamers. There have been many discussions about what game falls into what category and even how many categories there are! For simplicity let us say there are 3 categories.
Tactical level which can represent the fighting at its closest level, often, individual weapon information is used such as range and firepower. The maps quite often represent a generic area ie a road with some hills and rivers could be used for a fight around Caen in one scenario and a fight around Bastogne in another.
Operational level depicts operations such as the Battle for Normandy or the Battle of the Bulge. A unit of men such as a company will have the different weapons in that unit amalgamated together and given an attack figure. Maps will depict the specific area that is being fought over.
Strategic level games portray a wider area such as the whole of Asia, maybe the whole of the Atlantic or even the world. Strategic games are as much about resources such as fuel and ammunition as well as fighting.
The above descriptions are a generalisation and are not rigid but it will give you a good idea of which avenue you may want to follow.

To summarise the first section above.
If you have an interest in a particular theme, then go for that
Choose a period and whether it is land, sea or air based
Which level you wish to depict combat at
The above criteria may feel natural to answer but will give you a good leap into finding which game you want to play.

So now you have narrowed down the type of game you want to play, so you either look for games in the BGG database or ask for games in a forum in the particular categories you have decided upon. You are now faced with a list of games that are possibilities and you want to shrink the list until you find the game your after.

On a BGG game page you will find information about that particular game, a lot of information may be subjective and will act as a guide only, but some of the information is factual.

How much are you willing to pay for a game? Under the marketplace heading on the game page there will be games for sale and you will also see how much the games are going for on ebay. This will not only give you a guide to how much the game is going to cost you but also whether the game may be hard to obtain. A lot of wargames remain popular for years but once they go out of print then they may become hard to purchase.

Under the Statistics heading on the game page you will find “weight” but bear in mind that wargames tend to be a little bit more complex than euros. One anomaly are some of the popular introductory wargames which are rated by newbies may have their weight increased as these first games are weightier than the euro games which they have been used to playing.

In either the Files section or sometimes in the Web Links section you may find the rules for the game. This will be the biggest aid to determining if the game is for you. People will try to be helpful but what someone finds easy another may struggle with and vice versa. Read the rules through a few times but don’t expect to understand the game completely after this amount of time. If you read half way into the rules and seem to grasp what you have read so far then you should be able to understand the rest of the rules. It is easier to understand the rules when you have the game in front of you as you can handle pieces, look at tables and even play out certain sections of the game.

Box info, There are sometimes pieces of information found on the actual box of the game that may be helpful for you to make your decision. These can also be found in the info section on the relevant game page.
Solitaire suitability. Many wargamers play 2 player wargames solo, either to learn the rules or to play the game. Most wargames are 2 player but there are also some multiplayer and solo games too.
Game length. Like most games you might have to add a bit on to find a more realistic game length. Some of the tactical games can have scenarios with varying lengths of time. There are usually introductory scenarios as well as a good variety of other scenarios.
Complexity. A complexity rating may not be helpful on it’s own but is useful for comparing different games.
Utilise the game forums and wargaming forum to ask particular questions. “How are the cards used differently in Memoir and Tide of Iron?” for example. Bear in mind that people give honest information but that info can be skewed by hype, if they have just bought the game themselves, and their own personal complexity level.

So you have got your list down to just a few games and you are starting to ask information about them. People go into detail and you read their replies to find you scratching your head again. “Interdiction phase” , “LOS”, “CRTs” and your beginning to wonder if wargaming is for you. But don’t lose heart, let me try and explain some of the mechanics and ideas used in wargaming.

There are a lot of actions that occur in a single turn and many of these have to be made in a specific order eg firing occurs before movement perhaps, so to aid the player, designers split the turns into phases. Using the previous example you now have a firing phase followed by a movement phase, this keeps everything orderly and easier to manage.

Units

The units are the fighting forces that you will be using there are also counters with things like status, supplies etc and are the “paperwork” of the game. A game may be described as for example squad level, this means each unit represents a squad and does not mean all the counters together represents a squad. The units from the game below are from a game published in 2009. These particular units are of excellent quality and as a general rule, the newer the game the better the components. Euro games have probably helped to push quality up in wargames and many eurogamers may feel comfortable with wargames showing good as quality components.

There are 3 main styles of units.

Chits. Thick card which can hold a surprising amount of information. The most common information are 3 numbers which represent Firing or attack, defence and movement. These can be turned over to represent a loss of men, material or morale. Both sides can see each other’s counters although some rules state that the opposing player may not look at your stack (pile of units).
 


Miniatures. Made of plastic and some say are more aesthetically pleasing, but because of costs have a limited amount of different units, somewhere around 3 to 10 different unit types is usual. Even though games with Miniatures are often easier than their counterparts the amount of information a unit can hold is very limited. You may find yourself trying to remember different statistics for each unit. The many player aids and guides here on BGG can help tremendously.


Blocks. Wooden blocks that stand up so only you can see the statistics on them giving them a built in fog of war. These can be rotated as casualties occur. Quite often the wooden blocks are bare and so you have to put the supplied stickers on yourself.



Maps

Mounted Maps. Maps which are mounted have a hard backing like many of the common family games. Maps without a backing are simply called Paper Maps. These maps can sometimes not lie flat due to the folds. This problem can be overcome by laying a sheet of plexiglass or Perspex over the map before setting up the game (See the above image for the crease problem)


Hex and chit or hex and counter. A pattern of hexagons (commonly referred to as Hexes or hex’s) in an overlay is printed onto the mapboard to enable ease of movement, range in firing and various other aspects. The chits are the various combat units and counters made out of thick card. A hex and counter wargame is therefore a game which has a hex overlay and cardboard counters and units. Units may have to be stacked but some companies are now making games with larger hexes to enable units to sit side by side within the same hex. This is by far the most common but in recent years other ideas have begun to flourish.

Hex Map. A map with the hex overlay, some games replace the chits with figures or blocks. Figures may be deemed more aesthetically pleasing but they cannot hold as much information as a chit. Games with figures tend to have easier rules.



Area Movement. The map is divided into areas. Some games have areas connected by lines to regulate movement.
 



Movement on Maps. On a hex map many games utilise a “Movement Point” (MP) system where a unit can move across a map spending MPs for each hex it moves into. Some hexes may cost more to move into than others and also crossing a hex side may cost additional MPs. Movement on Area Maps is from one area to another.

LOS or Line Of Sight. LOS is simply an imaginary line between the firing unit and the defending unit. A dot in the centre of each hex is used to determine LOS. As well as walls, buildings, trees etc units may be at different elevations ie on a hill. All these can effect LOS. Certain types of LOS may block a units vision where other types may hinder LOS ie you can see the target but the orchard, for example, makes the target harder to see. In area movement games you may be able to see enemy units in adjacent areas. Some area movement games which utilise areas connected by lines use the number of connecting lines for LOS purposes.

Zone of Control ZOCs. A ZOC is usually the area around a unit in which it has some sort of control over. Often in hex games it is the 6 hexes surrounding a unit, although such items as a major river, may not let you exert control into those hexes. Some ZOCs you have to stop when you enter while others may cost you Movement Points to move through them.

Lets Fight!

Many wargames rules have similar mechanics and once you learn one set it will be much easier to play your next game. I mention this here because the rules for combat are probably the most varied but are often the easiest to follow. You will probably spend most of your time either moving or taking part in combat. Here are a few ways in which combat is resolved.

CRT. Combat Results Table. Along with hex and chit was the staple mechanic for early wargames. There are many different ways in which CRTs work but often you take your combat value of all attacking units and compare this to the defending stack and work out the result as a ratio ie 3 to 1. You may then have to modify this with certain factors, attacking across a river or infantry attacking armour for example then compare this result on the CRT with a die or dice roll. You then implement the results.


Modifiers. Many modern wargames utilise an attack and defence stat whereby the attacker takes his attack stat and modifies it for terrain the defender is in. He then has to roll a die or dice and beat the defenders defence value.

Buckets of Dice work out range, attack and defence to find a number of dice to roll and only numbers above X will count as hits. Some games utilise special dice which show hits and misses.

Mechanics

In the early days of hex and chit you could often move all of your units or fire all your units in an almost precision like manner. As a general you could organise troops to be at spot X and fire in turn Y and without hindrance you would probably get to do this. Some games now utilise cards this makes wargaming a less of a science and introduces an unpredictability factor, but not all wargamers like too much lack of control over their units. Different games that utilise cards have varying levels of luck.

There are Card Driven Wargames CDGs The game is driven by cards and you often have to make historical decisions. Other mechanics such as hex and chit can be utilised with CDGs. NB not all wargames that contain cards are described as a CDG.

There are simulation games which are as close to history as they can possibly be. Other games will sacrifice the historical aspect to make the game play easier or more balanced.

The Chit Pull system has a marker for each group of units, so for example a marker may cover a platoon containing 4 rifle sections. All the markers are placed into a cup and shaken up, a marker is pulled out at random and the units it relates to carry out their turn. When all the units in that group have been ordered then another chit is pulled out and its orders are carried out and so on until all chits have been taken from the cup.

Action Points (APs). Some tactical games, usually those that depict man to man combat utilise an Action Point system. In this type of game a player may use APs to do anything he wishes in any order up to the limit of his APs. Poor morale may be shown as a lack of APs.

Phases you might see in the various levels of games

Tactical gaming
Movement
Combat
Morale

Operational gaming
Movement
Combat
Exploitation – Some units may be able to chase and attack fleeing units
Supply – Check if your units are in supply by following supply lines back to your base line or supply depots

Strategic Gaming
Strategic Movement
Supply Determination
Naval
Air
Land Forces

There will be other phases, but these are the most common, some modern wargames include a “clean up” or “Housekeeping” phase where all counters (not units) are removed from the board, casualties organised etc. Some phases may even be skipped in certain cases.

I am predominantly a WW2 tactical gamer and so have used WW2 for the basis of this thread. I would appreciate any additions, clarifications or errata. This is intended to help the newbie decide which game maybe for them and on purpose have not mentioned any game names. I have tried to avoid promoting any type of wargame but I will offer this little bit of advice. Newer games are more likely to have better components, be more readily available and have rules that have learnt from previous mistakes. The negative of very new games is that the first edition rules can have some rules that need to be amended or clarified in later editions. This can be to someone who has spent a lot of time and effort learning a set of rules be disheartening when you have to relearn parts of the rules.

Edited to add info
  • [+] Dice rolls
Wulf Corbett
Scotland
Shotts
Lanarkshire
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I think something should be added about what size of pieces you might want. The counters you illustrate are from Conflict of Heroes: Awakening the Bear! – Russia 1941-42, about the biggest, thickest hex-and-counter counters around. Compare them to most of the 1/2" counters around, in stacks closely cramped together, and you might find them less appealing.
11 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
Greensboro
NC
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
This is awesome.

I want to point out that the weight ranking on BGG is absolutely worthless when it comes to wargames, though. Wargame weight is a completely different beast.

Tigris & Euphrates has a BGG weight of 3.6, whereas The Habit of Victory has a weight of 3.7...but the two games are nowhere near one another in complexity. A eurogamer comfortable with the rules load of T&E will be shocked when encountering HoV. If you are starting out with wargames, you want to look at games with a weight of less than 3.
9 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Wulf Corbett
Scotland
Shotts
Lanarkshire
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Rindu wrote:
Tigris & Euphrates has a BGG weight of 3.6, whereas The Habit of Victory has a weight of 3.7...but the two games are nowhere near one another in complexity. A eurogamer comfortable with the rules load of T&E will be shocked when encountering HoV. If you are starting out with wargames, you want to look at games with a weight of less than 3.
Confusingly, however, a growing number of the new breed of non-Grognad-friendly wargames are being rated by non-wargamers, so games like Conflict of Heroes: Awakening the Bear! – Russia 1941-42 and Hammer of the Scots have rating which look high compared to other wargames!
9 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
Greensboro
NC
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Yeah, good point. I don't know how the issue could be fixed--if the weight scale were increased to ten, then people would just rate Die Macher et alia as 8, 9, or 10, putting them on par with wargames.

The best would be to have a separate "wargame weight" stat or something like that.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Celina
United States
University City
MO
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thank you! That was a great summary.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Confusion Under Fire
United Kingdom
Warrington
Cheshire
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Rindu wrote:

The best would be to have a separate "wargame weight" stat or something like that.


That would be good but we must also be aware that we don't want to exclude any euro gamers that may be interested in wargames.

I will add any items to the thread which I think are worthy. The size of the pieces has been noted and will be added later.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
Greensboro
NC
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
whatambush wrote:
Rindu wrote:

The best would be to have a separate "wargame weight" stat or something like that.


That would be good but we must also be aware that we don't want to exclude any euro gamers that may be interested in wargames.


I don't think that would exclude eurogamers. Having a separate weight would show how heavy a particular game is as a wargame.

Memoir '44 has a weight score of 2.2. So does Battle for Germany. Are these really the same weight? Afrika Korps, Storm Over Stalingrad, Across Five Aprils, Afrika, Tomorrow the World, Thirty Years War Quad (second edition), Winter War, numerous Strategy and Tactics mag games, and so on, all have game weights lower than Settlers of Catan, which is surely inaccurate. A eurogamer who enjoys light games, who thinks Setters is about as heavy a game as they want to play, is probably not going to be well serviced by searching for wargames that are defined as lighter than Settlers in the BGG database.

The problem is that really "grognardy" games are only rated by wargamers, for whom something like ASL or World in Flames counts as a 5. By comparison, many "light" wargames are far heavier than typical euros.

2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Greg r
United States
TROY
Michigan
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
WOW this is great,

I keep trying to get into war games, but I am pretty clueless, I have a few, and I even get them set up, I get bogged down and never get a game going (no one to teach me) so I love this as a primer.

Does anyone know where I can find a list of War game Definitions ? That would help me out a lot also.

Thanks again for the time and pictures you put into it!! This is a great article.
7 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Very good. But maybe you should add a couple of less fancy chits, to demonstrate that not all wargames come with nifty graphics like the ones you used?

3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Wulf Corbett
Scotland
Shotts
Lanarkshire
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Even those are positively artistic compared to most older games:
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
Greensboro
NC
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Excellent point! I've read threads where euro-oriented gamers have criticized or expressed shock at the ugliness low relative low quality of wargame components. It's important to realise that this is just how wargames come. The example game used in the images is Conflict of Heroes, which is atypical.

Also, "counter" is the more appropriate term, not "chit." Chits are for putting in a cup and drawing, as in chit-pull mechanics for games like AVL.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris B
Canada
Victoria
British Columbia
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
This might be getting a bit dated, but check out the Wargames Handbook, by James Dunigan. It has explanations of the various systems and suggestions about how to learn the rules.

The second edition is published on the web, here's the link:
http://www.hyw.com/Books/WargamesHandbook/Contents.htm
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
c m
United States
ann arbor
Michigan
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Excellent post. There's some good information there.

One wrinkle I'd add has to do with "miniatures." I'd say there are two different types of miniature games: those with maps and those without. Games with maps and miniatures are, as you said, generally less complex: Tide of Iron, Memoir '44, etc. The minis are just attractive replacements for cardboard counters. Miniature games without maps (or on tables) are some of the most complex games made: Harpoon 4, SEEKRIEG 5, or even Jutland (a miniature game with cardboard counters!). Miniature wargaming is in a number of ways a separate hobby, even if there is a lot of crossover.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dan Conley
United States
Milwaukie
Oregon
flag msg tools
badge
Life is too short not to live it up a little!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
GREAT post! I've played wargames for years and STILL enjoyed reading it! Well done, Sir!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andreas Lundin
Sweden
Lund
-
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Quote:
Even those are positively artistic compared to most older games:


I thought these counters looked really good! (But I prefer symbols and icons over small miniture soldiers/tanks and stuff - I'm a bit backwards I know)
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Wulf Corbett
Scotland
Shotts
Lanarkshire
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
lundinandreas wrote:
I thought these counters looked really good! (But I prefer symbols and icons over small miniture soldiers/tanks and stuff - I'm a bit backwards I know)
I personally really dislike NATO symbols (or pseudo-NATO symbols) used in games set in ancient periods. I can stand it for modern pre-NATO, because most of the symbols are pre-NATO, but for Romans & ancient Brits? No.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andy Leighton
England
Peterborough
Unspecified
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Great work - it must have taken a while for you to do this.


Could someone expand the CDG section. For such a major part of the gaming world it is a bit under-specified for the newbie.

Also a number of people choose game by period so it might well be worth putting a short section in about that. I appreciate you are a WW2 guy and probably not best placed to do this by yourself.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jason Russ
United States
Marshall
North Carolina
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Well done!!

You might want to put in some links to the more popular wargame publishers so that newbies can see what is offered:

GMT: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgamepublisher/52
MMP: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgamepublisher/196
Columbia: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgamepublisher/49
Lock 'N Load: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgamepublisher/6025
Clash of Arms: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgamepublisher/94
Avalanche Press: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgamepublisher/142
Academy Games: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgamepublisher/7747
Critical Hit: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgamepublisher/928

Those are most of the biggies.

And here's a link to the top rated wargames on BGG:

http://www.boardgamegeek.com/browse/boardgame?sort=wargamera...


Cheers,
Jason
www.wargamedepot.com
8 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Janik-Jones
Canada
Waterloo
Ontario
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
Great War Commander, Cats were once worshipped as gods and they haven't forgotten this, Combat Commander Europe, The Raven King (game publisher) ... that's me!, Combat Commander Pacific
badge
Slywester Janik, awarded the Krzyż Walecznych (Polish Cross of Valour), August 1944
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
kypros wrote:


I'd certainly add:

Valor & Victory: http://www.valorandvictory.com
Victory Point Games: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgamepublisher/8007

To your excellent list.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Marshall Miller
United States
Malden
Massachusetts
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
The Warren is a roleplaying game about intelligent rabbits trying to make the best of a world filled with hazards, predators and, worst of all, other rabbits.
badge
Marshall is a Boston-based researcher and game designer.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Given all the variables presented here, I'd love to see a chart where you could cross-reference some of the variables with popular light-middle weight wargames. That way I could easily see what to look for in a WWII tactical level cdg or a revolutionary-war-era strategic chit-puller.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Confusion Under Fire
United Kingdom
Warrington
Cheshire
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Mease19 wrote:
Given all the variables presented here, I'd love to see a chart where you could cross-reference some of the variables with popular light-middle weight wargames. That way I could easily see what to look for in a WWII tactical level cdg or a revolutionary-war-era strategic chit-puller.


I do not know enough about the suggested topics but it might be an idea to cross reference some of the more popular wargames with the above variables so that a newbie can look at what they want in a wargame and see which games are available. BGG does this already in the advanced game search but I would include a more detailed chart.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
robin goblin
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
Avatar
DaveyJJ wrote:
kypros wrote:


I'd certainly add:

Valor & Victory: http://www.valorandvictory.com
Victory Point Games: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgamepublisher/8007

To your excellent list.


I would also add:

L2 Design Group: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgamepublisher/2069

Robin
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
John Kovacs
United States
Elyria
Ohio
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
An excellent post, sir, very well done! As one of the "old-time" gamers I thought your post was an excellent read and pretty darn thorough as well.

There are so many wargames out there to choose from that it really is hard to recommend just one or two, but if by reading this post a newbie can narrow his choices to something fairly specific he or she will get some really good recommendations.

I myself prefer tactical level games (World War II or later) and if you're looking for a tactical level World War II game you really cannot go wrong with Valor & Victory. The main reasons are that it is a great looking game, the complexity is low, and best of all - it's free! All you need is a decent printer and some cardboard and away you go. The designer, Barry Doyle, is constantly adding something to the game (new units, scenarios, etc.) and the players are getting into the act as well.

There's one other thing to remember - do not be afraid to ask anyone here a question or two - there are plenty of seasoned wargamers on this site who will be more than happy to answer your questions and guide you to the battlefield(s) of your choice.

Good hunting!
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Martin Gallo
United States
O'Fallon
Missouri
flag msg tools
badge
mbmbmbmbmb
An often overlooked game for people new to the hobby is Blitzkrieg General. The graphics are not everyone's favorite, but the game play is a step up from Risk and combined with its ability to play out the entire second world war on a table top makes it pretty good even for veterans of the hobby.

Great thread, by the way.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.