Recommend
4 
 Thumb up
 Hide
5 Posts

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Gaming Related » General Gaming

Subject: Table Rules rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
John R
United States
Saint Paul
Minnesota
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
[Cross-posted from our blog, Margin of Victory: an in-depth look at boardgames]

Since entering college in 2001, I've spent a lot of time playing either boardgames or roleplaying games. I've played in dorm rooms, apartments, convention halls, houses, and tents while sitting, standing, and kneeling. During that time, a group of "table rules" has spontaneously grown up through various play experiences, and I'd like to share them here:

1. Dice Etiquette: We've all had similar experiences. You get at to a critical moment in a game, someone rolls a handful of dice, and one or more fall to the floor. Do you "read it from the floor" or re-roll it? My call has been "Re-roll it!" If you can't keep your dice on the table, you need to cast them again, Butter Fingers. Similarly, cocked dice need to be re-rolled. If it's resting drunkenly against a rulebook or soda can, it's not a fair roll.

2. Food: I know some gamers will scream in horror, but we're okay with food at the table. We just ask that people use a napkin to clean off their fingers before handling game pieces. If you get the China Card greasy, there will be heck to pay.

3. Drinks: For the past eight years, I've had no problem with drinks at the table, as long as they're on coasters and people are mindful of them. However, I have personally spilled two drinks in the past two months and ruined two player aid cards. Now I keep my drink off the table, either on a nearby surface or at my feet. I also learned an interesting way of dealing with drink spills at the WBC: "You ruin someone's game, you buy him a new one."

4. Mulligans: In years past, we have been just fine with people rewinding the game state to fix a mistake. However, after reading and playing Wellington, I'm adopting Mark McLaughlin's rule: if you were playing a rule incorrectly, don't rewind the game, but begin playing correctly as soon as you realize the mistake.

5. Speed of Play: I gripe about analysis paralysis and "perfect move" play styles frequently, and rightfully so, dangit! But my brother has often reminded me that there is such a thing as playing too fast, especially when you have a number of inexperienced players at the table. Moving through a turn deliberately is crucial to ensuring everyone feels comfortable with what you're doing. In short, it gives them time to see the move, think about the move, and react to the move.

6. Teaching v.s. Coaching: This is a fine line in boardgaming. At our table, we ask that you assist other players fairly. For instance, if a new player asks you, "What's the best move to make here?" you should not deliberately avoid talking about that best move because it will hurt your own position on the board. Also, you are obligated to deal with other players as fairly as possible in negotiation phases, etc. Concealing the impact of a deal from a new player puts you on the level of a wet-palmed, shifty-eyed, lemon-dealing used car salesman.

Are there any table rules you use at your gaming table that I haven't mentioned? Let's hear about them!
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Tolin
United States
Beaumont
Texas
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Interesting post. We differ on a few things:

BeatGuy wrote:
1. Dice Etiquette: We've all had similar experiences. You get at to a critical moment in a game, someone rolls a handful of dice, and one or more fall to the floor. Do you "read it from the floor" or re-roll it? My call has been "Re-roll it!" If you can't keep your dice on the table, you need to cast them again, Butter Fingers. Similarly, cocked dice need to be re-rolled. If it's resting drunkenly against a rulebook or soda can, it's not a fair roll.


I've never been very concerned about die location after a roll. If it's on the floor, it's on the floor. It was still rolled, so I don't really see why it shouldn't be valid. Likewise for cocked dice--unless it's impossible to tell which side it's on, the dominant facing should stand.

BeatGuy wrote:
2. Food/3. Drinks...


Never really been a problem for us. Frankly, I'm more concerned about my table than the games. Coasters are a necessity.

BeatGuy wrote:
4. Mulligans: In years past, we have been just fine with people rewinding the game state to fix a mistake. However, after reading and playing Wellington, I'm adopting Mark McLaughlin's rule: if you were playing a rule incorrectly, don't rewind the game, but begin playing correctly as soon as you realize the mistake.


Here, we're exactly the opposite. If it's a mistake that can be fixed, we'll fix it and proceed correctly with the remainder of the game. However, that's not always possible (and frequently isn't), so in that case we'll play the remainder game the 'incorrect' way, to ensure fairness to everyone at the table.

3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Scott Pizio
United States
Fall River
Massachusetts
flag msg tools
Another year, another support drive, another silly Over text
badge
Which way to the nearest cliff?
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
BeatGuy wrote:

4. Mulligans: In years past, we have been just fine with people rewinding the game state to fix a mistake. However, after reading and playing Wellington, I'm adopting Mark McLaughlin's rule: if you were playing a rule incorrectly, don't rewind the game, but begin playing correctly as soon as you realize the mistake.


We usually play through the current game with the rules as we had misinterpreted them for consistency sake. Changing how the game is being played mid course will effect someones game somehow. Playing by the same incorrect rule to conclusion will effect everyone the same.

We will make sure to switch to the correct rule for the next game.

If the game has just begun, within 1-2 turns, we will restart if there is unanimous consent.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andrew Miller
United States
Oklahoma City
Oklahoma
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
BeatGuy wrote:
1. Dice Etiquette: We've all had similar experiences. You get at to a critical moment in a game, someone rolls a handful of dice, and one or more fall to the floor. Do you "read it from the floor" or re-roll it? My call has been "Re-roll it!" If you can't keep your dice on the table, you need to cast them again, Butter Fingers. Similarly, cocked dice need to be re-rolled. If it's resting drunkenly against a rulebook or soda can, it's not a fair roll.


Floor rolls are always rerolled for us. It doesn't really matter which you choose, just be consistent. We normally accept cocked dice; just remove the obstacle and read it then. If, however, the value of the die is very important to the game and the angle is great enough such that a removal of the obstacle in such a way can influence the die value we'll agree to reroll it for fairness.

Quote:
Food/Drink


I don't really care too much about food and drink. I'd rather have drinks on the table where people are careful around them than have them on the floor where there's a GREAT chance they'll be knocked over.

Sure, as a result, some of my games have had beer, &c. spilled on them, but hey, worse things have happened in the world.

Food: keep paper towels around and wipe your hands before handling cards and pieces. Simple as that.

As far as I'm concerned, board games are more about having fun with friends than keeping them in pristine condition and handling them like a faberge egg.

Quote:
4. Mulligans: In years past, we have been just fine with people rewinding the game state to fix a mistake. However, after reading and playing Wellington, I'm adopting Mark McLaughlin's rule: if you were playing a rule incorrectly, don't rewind the game, but begin playing correctly as soon as you realize the mistake.


I'm okay with time machining so long as everyone else is. If changing your decision would have significantly changed someone else's, well, sorry, sucks for you, but you made a mistake. Again, worse things have happened.

Quote:
5. Speed of Play


Playing by the book is very important when playing with newbies until they get the hang of it.

Many games we play are very strategic games, though, and require thought. As such, we grant reasonable amounts of time to make decisions. If we're playing the Red Dragon Inn or something, though, there's really little reason to take much time.

Quote:
6. Teaching v.s. Coaching


Absolutely let newbies in on simple strategies. If they're about to pass up a huge advantage or a chance to hurt someone else, let them know they can do it and why. Experienced players should be able to account for such things, anyway.

--ElSoy
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
SoCal
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
BeatGuy wrote:


1. Dice Etiquette: We've all had similar experiences. You get at to a critical moment in a game, someone rolls a handful of dice, and one or more fall to the floor. Do you "read it from the floor" or re-roll it? My call has been "Re-roll it!" If you can't keep your dice on the table, you need to cast them again, Butter Fingers. Similarly, cocked dice need to be re-rolled. If it's resting drunkenly against a rulebook or soda can, it's not a fair roll.

2. Food: I know some gamers will scream in horror, but we're okay with food at the table. We just ask that people use a napkin to clean off their fingers before handling game pieces. If you get the China Card greasy, there will be heck to pay.

3. Drinks: For the past eight years, I've had no problem with drinks at the table, as long as they're on coasters and people are mindful of them. However, I have personally spilled two drinks in the past two months and ruined two player aid cards. Now I keep my drink off the table, either on a nearby surface or at my feet. I also learned an interesting way of dealing with drink spills at the WBC: "You ruin someone's game, you buy him a new one."


1- I ask others when dice land slanted or cocked and go from there

For most situations, rolls that land on the floor are rerolled


2- & 3- I mind if components that need to be randomized are damaged and get marked. E.g., I don't mind if my Ticket To Ride Board gets soaked with orange juice, but if the cards get soaked and become easily identified among the clean ones, then that would ruin the game and I would be inclined to request compensation.


2- Played by ear. Some groups eat first, but not really to protect games, but just b/c it's believed that it'll be easier this way to focus on food first, then gaming. Otherwise, gmaes with enough downtime are esp. nice to go with food.

3- I prefer drinks to be not on the table. I have put drinks on the floor, but never near the table where there's a good chance feet will be at. I'll put it underneath a bookshelf. Otherwise, a side counter or TV tray is where I'll put it.

Strangely enough, more often than not, drinks have either been spilled away from boards and components, or done no harm since the cup was empty

At one group, someone mentioned that drinks on the table aren't an issue as long as you're careful. To me, that's like saying if you drive carefully, you don't need to wear a seatbelt. Accidents happen, and there's always the possibility that others may knock it over. In fact, at another date and time, same group, someone's Power Grid board got soaked with cola.


BeatGuy wrote:
4. Mulligans: In years past, we have been just fine with people rewinding the game state to fix a mistake. However, after reading and playing Wellington, I'm adopting Mark McLaughlin's rule: if you were playing a rule incorrectly, don't rewind the game, but begin playing correctly as soon as you realize the mistake.

5. Speed of Play: I gripe about analysis paralysis and "perfect move" play styles frequently, and rightfully so, dangit! But my brother has often reminded me that there is such a thing as playing too fast, especially when you have a number of inexperienced players at the table. Moving through a turn deliberately is crucial to ensuring everyone feels comfortable with what you're doing. In short, it gives them time to see the move, think about the move, and react to the move.

6. Teaching v.s. Coaching: This is a fine line in boardgaming. At our table, we ask that you assist other players fairly. For instance, if a new player asks you, "What's the best move to make here?" you should not deliberately avoid talking about that best move because it will hurt your own position on the board. Also, you are obligated to deal with other players as fairly as possible in negotiation phases, etc. Concealing the impact of a deal from a new player puts you on the level of a wet-palmed, shifty-eyed, lemon-dealing used car salesman.


4- I ask others how they want to handle it, on top of offering any solutions I can think of, and just go with group consensus. We generally do NOT backtrack, as that seems unnecessarily a big waste of time. That isn't to say we haven't done it, as build-ups that are truly critical may warrant a rewind, but those have been rare.

5- Since I generally take longer than others, I "slap myself" and force myself to move rahter than cuasing others to be too impatient. If others are taking too long, I'll try to be polite about that. Otherwise, I'll check cell phone messages or doodle on my PDA in the meantime, but will be more stern if someone needs to leave, etc.

6- I have been guilty of not pointing out situations that would've otherwise costed me the game, but as I know other players in my group do this, I feel better about such cases when they do occur.

For new games, I and others will provide assistance. In games where if you mess up early and can wreck the game, I'll point this out, and others have pointed this out too and suggested we 'get on track' to avoid a more negative experience with the game.



BeatGuy wrote:
Are there any table rules you use at your gaming table that I haven't mentioned? Let's hear about them!
One odd thing with one group is that couples (married or in a relationship otherwise) are banned from sitting next to each other. Too much tension and threats can ensue between them. I'd say let them sit next to each other and screw each other anyways. It can be good for the rest of us, but they insist none of the less.

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.